Exploration of stern areas


Jul 31, 2012
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I think it has been said that a major reason for less focus on the stern during dives is because there is nothing to see, partly due to the damage to the stern. Has any attempt been made to explore the lower decks where the hull has torn and fallen away?
 

Adam Went

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I believe there have been attempts made to explore the stern section in more depth but it is essentially just a pile of twisted, mangled and now corroded metal, especially at the forward end. You can basically only see what is visible from outside the wreck. I'd suggest that explorers with ROV's and the like are too nervous to even try and send them into the stern section because there's a good chance they wouldn't make it back out again, there's no saying how extensive the damage might be deeper inside the stern section. It is a shame as it would be nice to have the entirety of the wreck documented as much as possible!

Cheers,
Adam.
 
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Jul 31, 2012
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Yes, I imagine there isn't as much to see as in the bow section with all the bed frames, paneling remnants etc. But it just seems like such an obvious place for entry into the stern I thought I'd ask if any exploration had been done, with all the cabins exposed surely some of the corridors could be used to explore further into the wreck?

I know the bow is considered the prime area, not only because of the preservation but because the vertical access provided by the grand staircase. But I would like to see more of the stern interior, and if an rov could make it into the engineering spaces we'd hopefully learn a little we might not know. I do think there was an attempt to sneak past the reciprocating engines but they ended that attempt due to some tight maneuvering spaces I think. As much of a mess as the front of the stern is, I just can't help but wonder what the interior is like further aft.
 

Justin K

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I don't remember where, I think it was one of the expeditions Cameron did but I remember reading about them trying to peak into the windows of the A La Cart Restaurant and when they got close enough to look in, the ceiling of the restaurant was caved in and prevented them from seeing anything. Does anyone know of any artifacts that have been recovered from the restaurant?
 
Mar 18, 2008
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I think it was the 1996 RMS Titanic Inc. wreck expedition which send their ROV Robin into the stern areas. It was reported that the 3rd class cabins close to the stern were empty as if something had blow out everything.

In 2001 James Cameron wanted to visit the A-la-carte restaurant and the Cafe Parisien, but he was unable to do so as that area had collapsed.
Remains from the A-la-carte restaurant like light fixtures were found in the debris field and some of them recovered.
 
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Justin K

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Has anyone attempted to try going down the third class stairs under the poop deck? From what I understand, this is a vast opening just like the forward grand staircase.

I agree that we need to some how explore the stern, there has to be so much we could learn about the ship. There has to be alternatives to sending the rov inside. Maybe a sonar scan of the stern?

To the normal person it may not be important, but for us Titanic buffs's, we are certainly running out of time with the ship. The bow has really changed in appearance in about the last five years and I'm sure the stern is worsening faster.
 
Jul 31, 2012
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I think I remember an attempt being made but it was so torn up they couldn't get in, I think a railing was seen but they couldn't go any further than that.

That's why I'm thinking the cabins may allow easier access to the interior, and it would tell us a lot about what happened in those final moments.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Hi, do you remember if they went very deep inside the stern or did they just look into a few of the outermost cabins?

As far as I remember they only used the starboard side to send the ROV inside (because of the missing hull on that side). They tried to send it to a few more cabins inside but I can not remember how much.
Cameron later also try to find ways inside, and send his ROVs thought the main engine room (between the two reciprocating engines) and also try to find a way into the turbine room without success.
 
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Mar 18, 2008
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Has anyone attempted to try going down the third class stairs under the poop deck? From what I understand, this is a vast opening just like the forward grand staircase.

I don't think any ROV had been send down the stairs. It is very dangerous place. But it was filmed from above (and of course there are the photo mosaics from 1998 and the mapping from 2010 expeditions) and you could see still the floor tiles in that area.
 

Justin K

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Do you know where I can find the mosaics online? I have found them but they are not good enough quality to see the details.

Is there any footage from when they explored the stern cabins?
 
Jul 31, 2012
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As far as I remember they only used the starboard side to send the ROV inside (because of the missing hull on that side). They tried to send it to a few more cabins inside but I can not remember how much.
Cameron later also try to find ways inside, and send his ROVs thought the main engine room (between the two reciprocating engines) and also try to find a way into the turbine room without success.

Hi, Thanks. I remember the attempt to navigate the reciprocating engines, I only wish they had been able to succeed.
 
Jul 31, 2012
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I'm almost certain there was an attempt made to enter the stairs, but for some reason it was abandoned, either there was unexpected damage or it was deemed too hazardous.
 

Justin K

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I just watched on old documentary from the late 90's on the discovery channel. They were looking for missing pieces of the hull from between the third funnel casing and the reciprocating engine casing. They mention this area house the first and second class kitchen and the large refrigeration rooms for the food supplies. They mention the large amounts of cork floating on the surface as reports by survivors, the storage rooms were lined with massive amounts of cork which aided in insulating and keep the temps. consistent in the storage rooms. They said the amount of air trapped in these unites could be to be blame for the majority of the destruction for the forward end of the stern. If the stern went down vertically as it descended, when the storage rooms would of imploded and the air would have had no where to go but to float through the rest of the stern and out the aft cargo hatches and the third class stairwell. When putting this all together, that is why the forward end of the stern wreck is pushed inwards and the aft end of the stern is exploded out.

It makes a lot of sense. I'm sure there was much more air trapped in the stern at them time of the descend but I can completely understand why they came of with this hypothesis.

Any thoughts?
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Hi, Thanks. I remember the attempt to navigate the reciprocating engines, I only wish they had been able to succeed.

Oh, they (Cameron 2001 Expedition) did have success with sending the ROV though the main engine room but were unable to get into the turbine room. however the ROV reached the aft bulkhead. Same was tried with Boiler Room No. 2 by Cameron and RMS Titanic Inc. but there the way was blocked by debris.


I'm almost certain there was an attempt made to enter the stairs, but for some reason it was abandoned, either there was unexpected damage or it was deemed too hazardous.

Not sure about it. Are you sure your are not mistaken with the forward 3rd class stairs on D Deck?
 
Mar 18, 2008
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1,118
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I just watched on old documentary from the late 90's on the discovery channel. They were looking for missing pieces of the hull from between the third funnel casing and the reciprocating engine casing. They mention this area house the first and second class kitchen and the large refrigeration rooms for the food supplies. They mention the large amounts of cork floating on the surface as reports by survivors, the storage rooms were lined with massive amounts of cork which aided in insulating and keep the temps. consistent in the storage rooms. They said the amount of air trapped in these unites could be to be blame for the majority of the destruction for the forward end of the stern. If the stern went down vertically as it descended, when the storage rooms would of imploded and the air would have had no where to go but to float through the rest of the stern and out the aft cargo hatches and the third class stairwell. When putting this all together, that is why the forward end of the stern wreck is pushed inwards and the aft end of the stern is exploded out.

It makes a lot of sense. I'm sure there was much more air trapped in the stern at them time of the descend but I can completely understand why they came of with this hypothesis.

Any thoughts?



It was most likely a combination of implosions and the force of water which pull back the poop deck and caused some other damage. I think the two latest documentary's from RMS Titanic Inc (on History Channel) and James Cameron (on National Geographic) show this too.
The interesting with the different documentary's is, that you can see what was believed a few years ago depend on what was known from the wreck. Each wreck expedition found something new and with each new discovery some parts of the story changed.
 
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Justin K

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Have there been any studies done on how long it took for Titanic to start loosing its interior fittings to the bacteria?

Im sure if you were able to go down in the 1920's, the interior of the ship would still look the same.
 
Jul 31, 2012
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Oh, they (Cameron 2001 Expedition) did have success with sending the ROV though the main engine room but were unable to get into the turbine room. however the ROV reached the aft bulkhead. Same was tried with Boiler Room No. 2 by Cameron and RMS Titanic Inc. but there the way was blocked by debris.




Not sure about it. Are you sure your are not mistaken with the forward 3rd class stairs on D Deck?

I didn't think so, I guess it's possible.
 
Jul 31, 2012
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Have there been any studies done on how long it took for Titanic to start loosing its interior fittings to the bacteria?

Im sure if you were able to go down in the 1920's, the interior of the ship would still look the same.

None to my knowledge.

Probably, painted surfaces would have had some protection and would have held up quite well I imagine.
 

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