Exploring Scotland Road


Tim Gerard

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Do you mean use that crew passage instead of Scotland Road? I don't think such a passage really existed. I had a hard time with the directions Thomas Andrews gave Rose when trying to follow on ET's deck plans. I do know where the actual master-at-arms would've kept someone was in the middle of the ship, there would not have been a porthole.
 

Kate Powell

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I've always wondered if those directions in the film were real and actually led to where Rose needed to go or if the directions were made up. I've never checked the plans to see for myself.
 

Thomas Krom

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A good friend of mine edited the deckplan of E-deck to match the route Rose takes and you are not mistaken about the statements.
1597345927173.png

As you all can cleary see, the route would not have match up at all.
A passenger that would cause any problems would have be locked into the padded room on D-deck near the hospital (indicated as a locker on the deckplan).
 
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Cam Houseman

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Thanks for the cool visual, but I meant when James Cameron explored Scotland Road in 2005, why didn't he use the Grand Staircase or the second shorter hallway running parallel to explore Scotland Road
 

Kate Powell

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A good friend of mine edited the deckplan of E-deck to match the route Rose takes and you are not mistaken about the statements.
View attachment 49533
As you all can cleary see, the route would not have match up at all.
A passenger that would cause any problems would have be locked into the padded room on D-deck near the hospital (indicated as a locker on the deckplan).

Thank you Thomas.
I had my doubts about those confusing directions.
 
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Thomas Krom

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Thanks for the cool visual, but I meant when James Cameron explored Scotland Road in 2005, why didn't he use the Grand Staircase or the second shorter hallway running parallel to explore Scotland Road
It was meant as a response to the post of Mr. Gerard but never mind that.

I think something possibly blocked the way, from the pictures I own of the wreck of "Scotland road" (I never refer to the corridor as "Scotland road". We know some of the pipes have fallen down and to quote the talented historian Park Stephenson on his report of the 2001 expedition regarding the door at the E-deck landing of the forward Louis XIV staircase:
"and make another attempt to get into Scotland Road, this time via a door adjacent to the stairwell at the E-deck landing. Although this door is plainly there on drawings, it was not in evidence when we actually got there. There appears to be only a steel wall. Perhaps the door is steel, its hinges, etc., hidden behind rusticles. Another of the now-familiar electric sign boxes hangs near"
 
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Cam Houseman

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It was meant as a response to the post of Mr. Gerard but never mind that.

I think something possibly blocked the way, from the pictures I own of the wreck of "Scotland road" (I never refer to the corridor as "Scotland road". We know some of the pipes have fallen down and to quote the talented historian Park Stephenson on his report of the 2001 expedition regarding the door at the E-deck landing of the forward Louis XIV staircase:
"and make another attempt to get into Scotland Road, this time via a door adjacent to the stairwell at the E-deck landing. Although this door is plainly there on drawings, it was not in evidence when we actually got there. There appears to be only a steel wall. Perhaps the door is steel, its hinges, etc., hidden behind rusticles. Another of the now-familiar electric sign boxes hangs near"
Thanks! That explains it
 

Cam Houseman

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It was meant as a response to the post of Mr. Gerard but never mind that.

I think something possibly blocked the way, from the pictures I own of the wreck of "Scotland road" (I never refer to the corridor as "Scotland road". We know some of the pipes have fallen down and to quote the talented historian Park Stephenson on his report of the 2001 expedition regarding the door at the E-deck landing of the forward Louis XIV staircase:
"and make another attempt to get into Scotland Road, this time via a door adjacent to the stairwell at the E-deck landing. Although this door is plainly there on drawings, it was not in evidence when we actually got there. There appears to be only a steel wall. Perhaps the door is steel, its hinges, etc., hidden behind rusticles. Another of the now-familiar electric sign boxes hangs near"
also where can I read Ken's and Parks 2001 reports? I can never seem to find it. Thanks Thomas!
 

Tim Gerard

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It was meant as a response to the post of Mr. Gerard but never mind that.

I think something possibly blocked the way, from the pictures I own of the wreck of "Scotland road" (I never refer to the corridor as "Scotland road". We know some of the pipes have fallen down and to quote the talented historian Park Stephenson on his report of the 2001 expedition regarding the door at the E-deck landing of the forward Louis XIV staircase:
"and make another attempt to get into Scotland Road, this time via a door adjacent to the stairwell at the E-deck landing. Although this door is plainly there on drawings, it was not in evidence when we actually got there. There appears to be only a steel wall. Perhaps the door is steel, its hinges, etc., hidden behind rusticles. Another of the now-familiar electric sign boxes hangs near"

That's an interesting modified map to make Andrews's directions to Rose work.
 

Cam Houseman

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A good friend of mine edited the deckplan of E-deck to match the route Rose takes and you are not mistaken about the statements.
View attachment 49533
As you all can cleary see, the route would not have match up at all.
A passenger that would cause any problems would have be locked into the padded room on D-deck near the hospital (indicated as a locker on the deckplan).
Hang on, the Master at Arm's office was on the starboard side, right? And it had a porthole. But this map places the office almost amidships.
I drew a *very* shoddy map of what I think it could look like:
IMG_20200814_211209.jpg

The first image is proper E-Deck, drawn by me. The second shows Titanic 1997 E-Deck and the red is Rose's path
IMG_20200814_211154_kindlephoto-52459313.jpg

I edited and moved some rooms, so that they would be at least near their old locations.
 
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Thomas Krom

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The layout of the 1997 movie in general is not accurate and should never be taken as a source, among with the depiction of other spaces. The real master-at-arms cabin was a small interior cabin with two double bunks and a wardrobe.

1597481297034.png

1597481352251.png
 

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Mike Bull2019

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Yes, again, NEVER use films or documentaries as a primary source. This site has superb deck plans- start with those.
 
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The Master at Arms cabin was an exterior cabin on Olympic, with a porthole. Cameron used a exterior cabin also for Titanic as Jack Dawson could have a look outside and see the water rising which would be of a more dramatic effect. According to original script Jack would have seen a lifeboat lowered directly in front of him.
 
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Thomas Krom

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The Master at Arms cabin was an exterior cabin on Olympic, with a porthole. Cameron used a exterior cabin also for Titanic as Jack Dawson could have a look outside and see the water rising which would be of a more dramatic effect. According to original script Jack would have seen a lifeboat lowered directly in front of him.
That is indeed correct, on the Olympic when she entered service it was indeed an exterior cabin.
 
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Cam Houseman

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The Master at Arms cabin was an exterior cabin on Olympic, with a porthole. Cameron used a exterior cabin also for Titanic as Jack Dawson could have a look outside and see the water rising which would be of a more dramatic effect. According to original script Jack would have seen a lifeboat lowered directly in front of him.
Yeah, and A woman would say something like, "there's a man under the water!"
 

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