F B Jenkins obituary


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Jim Kalafus

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I came across thess obituaries in my hometown papers. One well researched- the other less so.....

BREWSTER STANDARD, March 24, 1922
Page 1, Column 1.

OBITUARIES

F.B. Jenkins

F.B. Jenkins died in his home on Carmel Avenue last Saturday about noon. He was ill but a short time. Only a week ago Monday he enjoyed roaming around his place with his wife and daughter making plans for the spring planting. On Tuesday he was taken with a severe cold, and notwithstanding all that prompt and persistant medical care and trained nursing could do, pneumonia set in and soon proved fatal.

Mr. Jenkins was the son of William and Millicent Jenkins of Trowbridge-Wiltshier England. He was born on November 11, 1885, and was in his 38th year. In manhood he graduated from a private school and became interested in business as an importer of woolens to America, and in this business he continued until his untimely death. He was the manager for Holland and Sherry, 1140 Broadway.

In June 1907 he married Elaine Nichols of London England, and to them was born a daughter, Josephine, now 14 years old, and a son who died in infancy.

They came to Brewster about a year ago, when Mr. Jenkins was not in good health. They were guests at the Southeast House. Having regained his strength here, Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins sought a home and purchased, from Joseph Comiskey, his beautiful home in the heart of the village, formerly the home of John R. Yale.

An interesting and exciting incident in Mr. Jenkins' short life happened a few years ago while an innocent passenger on board the ill-fated ship Lusitania. He was one of many who fell victim to Germany's submarine warfare. One of his friends who knew him best said that after he had been in the water for almost five hours he discovered a woman in distress. Swimming to her, he gave up his lifebelt. As luck would have it, he seized upon a passing piece of wreckage and pulled himself upon it and became unconscious. Since that terrible experience he suffered from nerves and was not a well man.

AND

PUTNAM COUNTY COURIER-BREWSTER BULLETIN
March 24, 1922
Page 1, column 1.

FRANCIS B. JENKINS
DIES OF PNEUMONIA
___________________________
WAS IN THE TITANIC DISASTER
______________
Since Suffered From Nervous Shock.
__________

...........On April 10, 1912, Mr Jenkins sailed from Southhampton England aboard the ill-fated Titanic, only to be met with one of the worst disasters ever recorded in history when on April 15 the palatial steamer was rammed by an iceberg and 1635 souls went to their deaths beneath the icy waters. Mr. Jenkins was afloat for nine hours in the water before he was rescued and taken aboard the Carpathia. through the ten years following, the nervous shock and exposure he suffered has never been eliminated from his constitution and when pneumonia fastened upon him last week, quickly followed by severe complications, his constitution could not withstand.
 
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Thanks for these- I have often wondered about residual effects experienced by passengers and thought it wasn't possible to have mortality resulting so long after the experience- but now Gracie's death and those of Barbara Anderson's mother and baby seem to confirm that pneumonia, respiratory and heart complications can and did haunt the survivors as grim souvenirs of their ordeal.
 

Jim Kalafus

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In the Ellis Island site, Mr. Jenkins has many entries. He returned to the US aboard the Aquitania in February 1922 shortly before he died. On the ship's manifest he is listed as having epilepsy- something not mentioned in the earlier manifests. So apparently something was causing seizures during the last year of his life. Severe panic attacks, perhaps?
 
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