Facing The End


Status
Not open for further replies.
M

matthew Sims

Guest
I dont start this conversation with the intent of being morbid, not in the least. It is, however, a subject ive often wondered about myself, and im wondering if others share my sentiment. I shall attempt to explain by way of a hypothectical situation.
Let us suppose we have been offered a chance to see how we would have reacted if we were one of the passengers whos fate was sealed, that was no chance of survival. We are being offered the chance, by way of chance, to see how we would have handled our deaths, or more to the point, how we spent the remaining time of our lives, and how we passed on to the next world. You get to come back to the present after you have seen this, but the rule of the visit is once you leave the visit of the past, you will have no memory of the experience. It is, a one time shot to see how you handled your own death.
The question now becomes, would you have the desire to see it for yourself? I have my own opinion on this, but shall withold until others have spoken
 
M

matthew Sims

Guest
OK fine, yes i personally would have liked to have seen. I would like to know that i handled my death with dignity and do all i could to save who i could with my remaining time. The question then becomes, why would i want to see? Simple. Not a single one of us knows in a situation like that how we will act. We can speculate and say how we think we would act, but the Gods honest truth is, we just dont know until we are faced with the reality. So yea, im willing to witness my own death to see how i woiuld have reacted in the time leading up to
 
S

Stacie Crowther

Guest
I fear death too much and want no part of it. I do not want to know when it's coming and hate discussing it.
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
Yes, I would want to see how I reacted in that situation. It may be hard to accept, but if I never got to see it, I would never know. And if I never know, I wouldn't know exactly what kind of mistake I made that time, and whether I might just make the same kind of mistake in a different situation due to ignorance.

The only way we can learn from our mistakes is to accept them.
 
M

matthew Sims

Guest
Charmaine, i give you all the credit in the world for giving the blunt response. Thats a lot of the same reasons i would want to know..Would i have been a coward? would i have ran for the nearest lifeboat? Or would i have choosen o lay down my life before me and worry about fellow man? Thats where the question becomes intriguing..Could we make the same decisions many of the heroes of that night did?
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
Matthew,

We'll never know, because we'll never be in the same situation as them. And even if we will be, we would have previous knowledge about what had happened before, and that is bound to alter our perceptions...

Regards,
Charmaine
 
C

Cassandra Crowther

Guest
I would like to hope that I would face the end with grace and dignity as so many of those aboard
TITANIC did that night.

Matthew is right when he says that none of us know what we will or will not do and how we will or will not act until the moment is upon us. We can speculate all we wish, but in that moment lies the real test.
 

Pat Winship

Member
May 14, 1999
441
6
263
This thread brought to mind a terse, but vivid first-hand account by a man remembering how he felt when he faced death at the age of sixteen. The writer is C.H. Lightoller, and this was to be the first time of many, of course. He's standing on the deck of the 4-masted barque Holt Hill, waiting for the ship to crash head-on into the rocks of Saint Paul's Island.

"A queer, hardly describable sensation of suspended animation. Everyone waiting without movement or word for the crash that must almost immediately be followed by the short sharp struggle. Then...what? I don't advise anyone to try it as an experiment. Take it from one who knows. It's unpleasant, mighty unpleasant."

CHL. Titanic and Other Ships

Pat W.
 
M

matthew Sims

Guest
Excellent passage, thnak you for sharing that..The larger question is, what did he learn from this experience? Did it in anyway change him, and possibly alter his reactions in 1912? This is what one would learn from an experience like this. It is a deep and vast look at yourself. It would be a reality check, knowing how you would react to such a situation
 

Pat Winship

Member
May 14, 1999
441
6
263
Good question, Matthew. Unfortunately, only Lights himself could answer it for you, and I don't believe he's available to ask. If you want my opinion on the subject, I think he learned how to manage his fears, and cope in life-threatening situations. In 1912, I believe he thought he could survive the sinking when he stayed with the ship.

Pat W
 
D

Denise Rajauski

Guest
I'm of the thought that I want to fall asleep one night on Earth and wake up the next day with halo firmly in place. Or forked tail, as the case may be. I don't want to know about it.

I was recently present at two deaths, both from cancer. The first one was a neighbor, who did not die well-he knew it was happening and he panicked. The second one was my grandmother, and she died knowing what was happening and embracing it with great peace. I would hope to be like her, but I have great fear that someday I'll be more like my neighbor.

So, no. Not me. It's hard enough to contemplate the people who actually did die.

Denise
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads