Fake "TITANIC" On Hull


Status
Not open for further replies.
Jan 31, 2001
1,190
22
233
I'm sure that everyone hear has seen that wonderful shot showing the Titanic not yet completed, with her name painted on her side. Well, did you know that that name was NOT on the ship's side when that photograph was taken? That's right, the name visible on the side of the ship in this pic. was apparently not there at the time. This website I discovered explains it all:


-B.W.
 
J

jean leysman

Guest
Interesting Brandon! I already brought this subject up before. My question then was: Why is the name Titanic not visible on any picture IÕve ever seen of her. And believe me, IÕve seen a lot of them. Not one clearly displays the name, wether itÕs on the stern or on the bow. This led me to believe that the name just wasnÕt there!
it may not be of much importance but on the other hand itÕs strange: ships at that time used to have their names painted on them (well... at least on the bow).

Regards
Leysman
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 25, 2001
503
7
183
From what I understand, there are two of those pre-launch bow shots. One (the one you usually see) really has the name on the side. The other, less known one was taken before the name was put on, but someone sratched the name in on the negative.
 
Jan 31, 2001
1,190
22
233
Jean,

When the Titanic sailed, the name was indeed there. There was a slight "mold", if you will, on the starboard and port sides of the bow, into which yellow paint was poured into. Or at least, this is what I have been told. I have read that there has even been evidence of the name on the wreckage, and that the letter "C" has shown up in some of the underwater footage.

-B.W.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
That's right. The name was incised in the hull and the letter's were filled in. They were quite small, I think around 15 to 18 inches high. I have a good print of the famous photo of the ship clearing the dock. (The one with all the smoke, the tug and the old man sitting watching) With vivid imagination and magnifying glass I can just about see traces of the name.

I wonder if part of the problem is the orthochromatic film used in those days. It made red things look black. What did it do to gold or bronze? I notice that in a photo of the grand staircase (probably on Olympic) the bronze is only visible where the flash has lit it up. Further off it merges with the black.
 
Jan 31, 2001
1,190
22
233
"It made red things look black."

Which explains why, in that same print with the old man you mentioned above, the ship's waterline area appears dark gray or black, instead of red.

Also, if the name on that one shot of Titanic is simply scratched onto the negative, then how do we even know it's the Titanic? It's only a bow shot, and Olympic and Titanic did not differ in the way their prow looked, did they? Just curious.

-B.W.
 

Dan Cherry

Member
Dec 14, 1999
775
9
263
Jean,
did you ever find those pictures I referred you to back a few months ago? There's about a dozen pictures showing Titanic's name clearly on her bow and 2 good ones of her stern!
The one of Titanic on the stocks and her bow name was painted, or etched, on the photographic plate. The person who did it tried to match the style of the lettering but didn't do too well...
Anyway, Jean, I hope you find a few of those pictures - they are really cool!
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 25, 2001
503
7
183
On page 10 of the Susan Wels Titanic book is the photo of the bow with the name scratched in. The more well known photo that features the real name is right before the table of contents in An Illustrated History. This picture shows the name as it actually appeared. If you look really close, you can even make out what looks like shadows inside the engraved letters. Another view of the nameplates can be seen in the photo of Titanic being fitted out on pages 24-25 of the Susan Wels book.
An interesting side note is that, while the letters in both pics are identical in size and placement, the fitting out pic shows the letters black, while the launch pic has them white. I do have a theory, though. What if the famous launch photo originally had the letters black. When the photo was developed, it was realized that the black nameplates didn't show up well on the prints (and especially in the newspapers). Because of this, someone doctored the negative so that the name would be more obvious. That would explain why the letters look somewhat sloppy. Perhaps the shadows that I saw are actually the real letters.
Did anything that I just said make sense?

David
 
J

jean leysman

Guest
To Dan Cherry

Yes Dan I found them and the name was clearly visible indeed. Thanks for referring to them.
But still... The name appears to have been scratched into he negatives of many Titanic photos quit often (for whatever reason). But if the experts say that the name was actually there then I ofcourse believe them.

Leysman
 

Dan Cherry

Member
Dec 14, 1999
775
9
263
Jean,
yes, there are more than one pictures where the name is scribed on the hull - some are decently written (yet still easily seen as fake) and some are downright awful (particularly pictures of Olympic where the name Titanic was overwritten. One can usually find an unmarked copy of the original pictures somewhere. The best bow plate names are from when the ship is at Southampton (and one in the outfitting quay (ssen in Susan Wels' book)) and the best stern one (of two) I've noted is the stern shot at Queenstown.

Regards,
Dan C.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads