Fan room


Jul 11, 2001
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On a kind of related topic... what was the deal with the vent registers in the public rooms? You can see the vent grills in pictures of the Gym and also along the ceiling of the reading and writing room. If these rooms were heated by those Prometheus box type heaters, were the vents for fresh air intake or removal?
 
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Scott R. Andrews

Guest
David,

Those electric heaters you see were intended only as supplementary heat sources. These were used to boost the temperature of a room or area above the ambient temperature of the warmed air already being supplied via ventilating machinery to the various public rooms and blocks of staterooms. In addition to the large fans which supplied air to the boiler rooms, there were literally dozens of other electric ventilating fans of varying horsepowers throughout the ship, supplying fresh and/or heated air to practically every space onboard. Some of these drew in air and then forced it through supply trunks to various parts of the ship, while others acted as suction fans, drawing stale air out of other portions of the vessel, maintaining a constant change-over of the atmosphere within the ship. For cold weather, many of these fans were supplied with a heat exchanger for warming the incoming air; these heat exchangers contained a tube bundle which was supplied with steam from the auxiliary range at a greatly reduced pressure.

Some of these fans were visible on the weather decks (quite a few can be seen in the Boat deck photos), but many more are buried throughout the various decks, some deep within the ship. Bruce Beveridge's detailed general arrangement plans reveal the location of the hidden heating and ventilation apparatus.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Yes. There were fans for summer on board the Olympic class liners.In photographs in side the first class cabins, you can see a little ceiling fan,just like how we can buy them at Target and K-mart.Same with light bulbs,verturly you are looking at the same ones from you're own home.I'm amazed how some technolghy has not change in 97 years.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>I'm amazed how some technolghy has not change in 97 years.<<

A lot of it wouldn't. Some of the fundementals of shipbuilding haven't changed at all since the first logs took to the water. A monohull design, regardless of material used, fittings installed, refinements made, or the means of propulsion, is still a monohull design.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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Electrical and electro-mechanical devices haven't changed much because they operate on very simple principles. What they didn't have in 1912 was electronics, and that makes a huge difference to the convenience and safety of our lives compared with theirs. They had wireless telegraphy, for instance. We have broadcast TV and radio, SatNav, computers and the Internet.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
>>and that makes a huge difference to the convenience and safety of our lives compared with theirs. They had wireless telegraphy, for instance. We have broadcast TV and radio, SatNav, computers and the Internet.<<

Bob sir. True,we do have powerful technolghy and i'm gald.Sometimes though i can really throw my pc out,sometimes modern tecnolghy is compitcated and it gets on my nerves lol.

Michael sir.Yeah,it can be like that.Ships today are built for the same purpose as Titanic was.
 

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