FATE


Jan 29, 2001
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Just last night I was again reading: LINER BREMEN SIGHTS 100 OR MORE BODIES. Upon completion of that particular column, next column over reads:

ACCIDENT PREVENTED SUCCOR.

Ypiranga Would Have Been Near Titanic but for Another Ship's Distress.
PLYMOUTH, April 24-The Hamburg-American steamer Ypiranga. which arrived here to-day, reported that she would have been within one or two hours' steaming distance of the Titanic at the time of the disaster if she had not received a wireless message from Cape Race on Saturday, April 13, stating that the German-Australian Line steamer Augsburg was drifting helplessly in mid-Atlantic. The Ypiranga went south, seeking the Augsburg.
On Sunday night she received the Titanic's call for aid, and preceeded, immediately at full speed in the direction of the White Star steamer, but when within fifty miles of the scene
she learned that she was too late.
END ARTICLE-

I wonder if it would have resulted in the rescue of passengers from the water, if Ypiranga had arrived on scene much earlier, say an hour, as opposed to the Carpathia's four hr. mad dash?

I have had copies of this 25 April 1912 NY Times (Owing to Bremen article) for many yrs. but did not pay attention to the Ypiranga article until just last night.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 

david wilson

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Feb 17, 2004
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Titanic sank on 15th april 1912.On the night of 15th of april 1941 hitler's bombers flattened H&W & a sizable area of east belfast.HMS eagle's sister HMS arkroyal was tied up having repairs.They missed her!You have to ask the question,was this just coincidence?
regards.
dw.
seven degrees west.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>You have to ask the question,was this just coincidence?<<

Fog of war, random chance...damned right it was a co-incidence and a fortunate one as well. Let's not forget that precision bombing of the kind we take for granted and which we see shown on CNN every time a war breaks out somewhere was a pipe dream in World War Two. Even with the best daytime navigation, they were often lucky to hit the right neighbourhood!

Oh there were some game attempts allright. The Norden Bombsight comes to mind. However, airial bombing was still so inaccurate that in order to have even a chance of hitting anything specific in a wide area, the attacking force had to send in a lot of aircraft to carpet bomb the area.
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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Funchal. Madeira
Bang-on! Michael (sorry about that).
In 1941. Hitler's Dorniers couldn't hit a cow on the backside with a banjo even if they had it by the tail (the cow that is). We were just about as useless. That type of bombing was a terror tactic that both sides used. On the other hand, I understand the dive bombers (Stukas?) were a bit more lethal. I seem to remember it all got better (I don't think the lads on the Malta and Murmansk convoys would agree with that description) towards the end. There is a story of an RAF Mosquito making a low-level run up the street of a french town and lobbing a bomb through the door of the local Gestapo HQ. Something to do with eliminating a prisoner the Nazis were interrogating before he spilt the beans. Fortunately time begins to rub-out such memories.

Jim.
 
Jan 29, 2001
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Not wanting to steer off track for more than a moment, owing to my Aviation interest as well,
was'nt the RAF Mosquito noted for it's "damn busting" capabilites, by way of the rolling barrel bomb?

Back to the mid-atlantic run now.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
Apr 27, 2003
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Fate?
In response to David Wilsons post above - On the 14th April 1941 the Germans bombed Southampton Docks (again) with six High Explosive bombs falling near the large Harland & Wolff factory - no major damage was done except a fractured water main by the Dock gates.

Mike - The plane used to the dambusters raids were Lancasters - the Mosquitos were used and known as Pathfinders - they found and selected the targets for the following mass of heavy bombers.
We will need one to get back on topic!
Cheers Brian
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>> I understand the dive bombers (Stukas?) were a bit more lethal.<<

Dive bombers tended to be the most accurate strike aircraft of the war, at least at it's beginning. Even then, the accuracy wasn't that great but it was far better then what was achived simply by flying straight and level when you got into the target area.

The catch?

You had to aim the whole aircraft at the target, often in the face of some whithering anti-aircraft fire. They also had a poor survival rate in zones where they didn't have adaquate fire support and air superiority. The Stuka drivers learned this the hard way. They may have been deadly accurate by the standards of the day, but left to their own devices, they were easy meat for prowling Allied fighters.
 

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