Father Browne photos


Hi there,

Is there a website out there that has copies of the photos Father Browne took on the Titanic? I'm interested as I have photos of a dressing table from the Olympic that is exactly the same as the one that was in his cabin. It would be good to have a link to the photo of the inside of his cabin showing the wardrobe.
 
D

David Colton

Guest
Stuart,

Try this site: fatherbrowne.com
It shows most of the photos he took of Titanic. It also shows some other photos that Father Browne had taken during his life.
Hope this helps.

David.C
 
Dec 7, 2000
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I haven't been to a Fr. Browne web site for a while, but from memory, I don't think it shows any pictures of his cabins. Stuart there¡¦s plenty of pictures of Olympic's cabins that show the same dressing table that was in his cabin. The pictures are from the ¡¥Shipbuilder¡¦, and so far as I know you can use them without breeching copyrights as most of the cabin pictures are no longer part of any archive and 'Shipbuilder' no longer exists. I hope someone can correct me if I'm wrong!

Daniel.

PS. And if the pictures are still part of an archive, they¡¦re part of the wrong archive as the pictures are originally H&W photos.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
<FONT COLOR="ff0000">Caution,if memory serves, The Shipbuilder does exist in an incarnation as "Shipping World and Shipbuilder." (I may have the name wrong.) In regards copyrights, it never hurts to check rather then assume.

Beats getting sued if you guess wrong.
crazy.gif


Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
K

kelly murru

Guest
Stuart,
I don't know the Father Browne web site, but I do know that there's a book that shows all his pictures called "Father Browne's Titanic Album". Theres also a Postcard book that has the picture that you're talking about called "Postcards from the Titanic" Photographs By Father Browne. And if you're really intrested, Titanic the Exhibition in Orlando, FL has the complete collection of Father Browne's Pictures. I hope I helped alittle bit. Good luck!!!
 

William Oakes

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Mar 6, 2020
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Does anyone know the make and model of the camera that Father Frank Brown used while on board Titanic?
I have search high and low and cannot find the answer to this question.
I am deferring to the wisdom of you experts!
Thanks in advance.
 
May 3, 2005
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Does anyone know the make and model of the camera that Father Frank Brown used while on board Titanic?
I have search high and low and cannot find the answer to this question.
I am deferring to the wisdom of you experts!
Thanks in advance.
I have seen pictures of the camera that Browne was used but I can't remember where just offhand at present.
I believe it was a Kodak "Brownie" type folding type camera that used roll film.
You can find some pictures of the camera by searching on "Kodak Brownie Folding Camera"
I remember seeing these .
I believe the story was that the camera was a Birthday gift from his Uncle, who was a Roman Catholic Bishop.

They had the case which contained the roll film.
The lens and shutter were on sort of a bellows and folded up into the case for carrying.
Also I believe that Browne was very much into photography as a hobby.
He probably did his own processing....that is developing the film, making prints, etc.
I don't know if he had an enlarger and made enlargements too.

Just a few notes from this "camera bug" for those who were not familiar with the process.
Film in those days was on some kind of a base something like plastic coated with material sensitive to light.
This was before Kodachrome or Kodacolor....just black and white.
The film was called a "negative"....blacks were white, whites were black, etc.
No digital cameras of course.
The average person just took their pictures and took the film to your drug store.
They sent it out to a film processor. "Elko" was a big company that did this.
And you picked up a package with the film and pictures a few days later .

Or if you were into the hobby you did it yourself.
You had a room called a "dark room" ....all the window and doors were sealed so that no.light got in.
You took the film out in the dark . Light would ruin it . You had a dim red light bulb in the dark room to work with.
The film was protected with a dark paper.
You took the film itself out of this and put it in a "developing tank" (which was light tight )
Then your poured in a chemical called " developer" whick brought out the image on the film.
Then "short stop" to stop the "developer", "fixer" to make it permanent, washed it and hung it up to dry.
That was your "negative.

Then you reversed the process using the negative in a little frame which you put the "negative" over a "contact paper" , exposed it to white light for a few seconds.
Then you went back into the dim red light mode and did the same process as the film.
You washed your prints and rolled them out on a metal sheet called a "ferrotype".
And when they dried you had your glossy "photos" in black and white.

And that is how it was done back in the dark ages ( no pun intended .LOL) of olden times. :)

If I left out any steps, fill me in !
And you had to buy ready mixed developers, etc. made by Kodak or mixed them yourself.
 
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I don't know if there are still any amateur photographers who still do their own processing.... any of those persons on these forums ?
They could probably fill you in on any other details .

Another question.
Camera lens openings ," f stops such as f16 etc" and shutter speeds such as. " 1/50 second etc" had to be set manually on some of those camera. I am wondering if some sort of exposure meter was used or if Browne just knew where to set them from experience since his pictures are so clear and we'll focussed ?
 
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William Oakes

Member
Mar 6, 2020
67
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I have seen pictures of the camera that Browne was used but I can't remember where just offhand at present.
I believe it was a Kodak "Brownie" type folding type camera that used roll film.
You can find some pictures of the camera by searching on "Kodak Brownie Folding Camera"
I remember seeing these .
I believe the story was that the camera was a Birthday gift from his Uncle, who was a Roman Catholic Bishop.

They had the case which contained the roll film.
The lens and shutter were on sort of a bellows and folded up into the case for carrying.
Also I believe that Browne was very much into photography as a hobby.
He probably did his own processing....that is developing the film, making prints, etc.
I don't know if he had an enlarger and made enlargements too.

Just a few notes from this "camera bug" for those who were not familiar with the process.
Film in those days was on some kind of a base something like plastic coated with material sensitive to light.
This was before Kodachrome or Kodacolor....just black and white.
The film was called a "negative"....blacks were white, whites were black, etc.
No digital cameras of course.
The average person just took their pictures and took the film to your drug store.
They sent it out to a film processor. "Elko" was a big company that did this.
And you picked up a package with the film and pictures a few days later .

Or if you were into the hobby you did it yourself.
You had a room called a "dark room" ....all the window and doors were sealed so that no.light got in.
You took the film out in the dark . Light would ruin it . You had a dim red light bulb in the dark room to work with.
The film was protected with a dark paper.
You took the film itself out of this and put it in a "developing tank" (which was light tight )
Then your poured in a chemical called " developer" whick brought out the image on the film.
Then "short stop" to stop the "developer", "fixer" to make it permanent, washed it and hung it up to dry.
That was your "negative.

Then you reversed the process using the negative in a little frame which you put the "negative" over a "contact paper" , exposed it to white light for a few seconds.
Then you went back into the dim red light mode and did the same process as the film.
You washed your prints and rolled them out on a metal sheet called a "ferrotype".
And when they dried you had your glossy "photos" in black and white.

And that is how it was done back in the dark ages ( no pun intended .LOL) of olden times. :)

If I left out any steps, fill me in !
And you had to buy ready mixed developers, etc. made by Kodak or mixed them yourself.

I know this much; that it was a Kodak vest camera, patented in 1902.
I know what it looks like; sort of a folding bellows type camera with a winding key.
I was hopeful that there was an actual model number and that someone might know it.
The "brownie" of that time period was more of a box shaped rectangular cube.
(Not what Browne used)
Thank You Robert for all of the great info.
 
May 3, 2005
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I know this much; that it was a Kodak vest camera, patented in 1902.
I know what it looks like; sort of a folding bellows type camera with a winding key.
I was hopeful that there was an actual model number and that someone might know it.
The "broThawnie" of that time period was more of a box shaped rectangular cube.
(Not what Browne used)
Thank You Robert for all of the great info.
Thank you William-

Those cameras were also known as "vest cameras".
Supposedly you could carry them in a vest pocket....they did look a bit bulky for that.....maybe vests had bigger pockets in 1912 ?
Maybe you could write or check on the Internet with Kodak. They might even know the very model and serial number of Father Browne's camera. Of course it might have been of some other make. Germans have always been big on the camera market. Maybe it's in a museum somewhere ?
As you mentioned in the 1902 date they were the very latest things in cameras in 1912 and probably relatively expensive for the time.

I get carried away and get rather wordy on some of my posts.:)
But I thought I would let your know that just "taking a snapshot " wasn't so simple back in 1912.
 
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After a little further research I found some information

Probably a later model in #2 was after the original #1 of 1902 ?
Some of these cameras were labeled as "Brownie 2 patented 1908"

There were some others.......2A, 3A, etc.

So if Browne's camera was a Kodak it could have been in one of those groups.
 
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There were different models but they were pretty much the same. You can see many examples in the link below. I read an article that said when they were going thru the negatives after Father Browne died to make the Titanic book there were around 1000 negatives of Titanic. Is that true? How many rolls of film would that be for that type camera? Not saying its not true but that seems like a lot of pictures..especially in those days.
 
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There were different models but they were pretty much the same. You can see many examples in the link below. I read an article that said when they were going thru the negatives after Father Browne died to make the Titanic book there were around 1000 negatives of Titanic. Is that true? How many rolls of film would that be for that type camera? Not saying its not true but that seems like a lot of pictures..especially in those days.
I understand Father Browne was quite an amateur, but very skilful photographer.
And he took a lot of pictures during his lifetime.
But mostly noted for his pictures of the Titanic.
From this amateur "camera bug" I would say that 1000 negatives wouldn't be unreasonable.
But 1000 negatives of the Titanic itself doesn't sound reasonable.
I've just gotten into digital camera photography a few years ago and count around at least a total of at least 600 or so.
And that doesn't count stacks and stacks of old 35 mm Kodachrome slides.
But 1000 negatives of Titanic.......?????????
Father Browne would have been very busy to take 1000 pictures on his short voyage from Southampton to Queenstown.
Just think how many there might have been if Father Browne had gone to New York and back safely with himself and his rolls of film if his Uncle, the Bishop , hadn't ordered him " No ! Get off that ship" ( In
Queenstown ) ?
 
Nov 14, 2005
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This is a different article than the one I referenced above but it says the same thing...1000 photo's in 2 days. Hard to believe but I guess possible.
 

William Oakes

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Mar 6, 2020
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Father Browne is now considered the father of Photojournalism.
He took thousands of photos throughout his lifetime and during his service in WW1.
Many were published in magazines and newspapers.
 
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Kodak introduced 127 roll film in 1912, interestingly enough, too !
8, 12 or 16 exposures per roll per roll, depending on the size and shape of the format.
Did Father Browne take a bag of film along with him on his Titanic visit ?
 
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Father Browne is now considered the father of Photojournalism.
He took thousands of photos throughout his lifetime and during his service in WW1.
Many were published in magazines and newspapers.
If you will forgive me for posting these two " Father Browne Trivia" :. :)
James Cameron ( of the 1997 "Titanic") is said to have based at least two scenes in the movie from Father Browne's photos :
(1) The Marconi Room
(2) Frederic Spedden with his son, Robert, spinning a top on a deck on the Titanic.
Also, the part of Frederic Spedden was played by Don Lynch.
Of course, there are possibly many others ?
 

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