Favorite Moment


Wesley Burton

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Apr 22, 2004
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My favourite scenes were the ones with Andrews as the ship sinks. Especially how he tells the captain that the ship will sink.
I cant help but laugh when I see Ismay's reaction to the news that his ship is going down. I doubt any actor has or will ever get Ismay's real look right. Sadly I will never know....
 

Marty Comes

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May 20, 2004
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I love those scenes too, and every time I open my curio cabinet, I am greeted by the lovely scent of Vinolia Otto Toilet Soap, one of my favorite acquisitions, particularly because of that scene in ANTR


Hi Kyrila!
I'm curious.....what does it smell like?
Love,
Marty
 

kevin lea

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Apr 21, 2003
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I think the terrible scene where captain smith solemly walks into the wheel house in what he seems to think is the right thing to do under the hopeless circumstances, and the ship suddenly takes a nose dive as the entire bridge is submerged is very graphic with lightoller being washed off into the sea in the process.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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One of my favorite lines was: "If they're gonna lower the boats, they better put some people in 'em!" This, of course, was said by Walter Hurst as he came rushing up on the forward well deck just in time to see lifeboat #1 being lowered with only twelve people. That line, to me, summed it all up regarding the issue of loading the lifeboats.

One of the most dramatic scenes to me, believe it or not, was a short scene that had no actors or lines; it was the scene in the first-class dining saloon when the poultry cart comes rolling down the aisle and crashes into another cart. That's all we needed to see to grasp the seriousness of the situation: no people or dialogue--just a rolling cart. Kind of subtle, but that's what made the scene so great.

By the way, I watched the movie again the other day, and I listened closely. When the people were crawling up the poop deck, that older Irishman was having a difficult time. That one young Irishman (the one who had helped the Irish girl up on th cart. Was that Redmond Phillips?) came to help the man, calling him "Mr. Murphy." Now, according to the cast list presented on this forum, there is only one "Mr. Murphy," so after that, I presumed the older, heavyset Irishman was John Cairney. The information given in the post above in this thread differs from this. Can anyone give me the real-name rundown on the third-class Irish clique, please? I'd appreciate it. Other than that instance and the occasional instance when the dark-haired fellow (the singer) was called "Paddy"/"Patty" (Patrick), none of their names were given that I've noticed. By the way, "Paddy"/"Patty" was not even listed in the cast list. The name "Jim Farrell," however, was. Is it possible that the dark-haired guy was the older guy's son? That may somewhat explain it.

Thanks!
 

Bob Godfrey

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The darker and livelier of the two young Irishmen was Murphy, played by John Cairney. His quieter friend was Martin Gallagher, played by Richard Clarke. Neither actor was actually Irish. The older Irish couple were the Farrells, played by Patrick McAlinney and Bee Duffell. In the cast list Mr Farrell is called James, though for some reason the priest in the Irish village scene calls him Tom. As for 'Paddy', to the English that's a generic term for all Irishmen. My own father, a Dublin man whose given name was Albert, was always Pat or Paddy to friends and family.
 
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Thanks for clearing that up, Bob. I'm wondering why Martin Gallagher called the older Irishman "Mr. Murphy." The next time you watch it, listen close in that scene. That's what he says. I played it back several times. DVDs really come in handy with pause and quick playback, hehe.

As for the "Tom"/"Jim" discrepancy, it was probably a last-minute script-change. It happens a lot. If I remember correctly, there was a real Jim Farrell on board the Titanic. Maybe MacQuitty didn't want to portray any real immigrants in the movie, if that makes any sense.

By the way, "Cairney" sounds like an Irish name to me. Strange for someone who isn't really Irish, unless, perhaps, it was a stage name. Is he still alive?

Just my thoughts
 

Bob Godfrey

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John Cairney is a Scotsman - a lot of Scots have Irish names. Still around as far as I know. He was a very familiar face in British films and TV in the '60s and '70s, as was Pat McAlinney, who played a Liverpool Irish priest in a long-running comedy series The Liver Birds on TV. I don't remember Clarke so well.

I just checked the scene you mentioned (Poop Deck) and the only dialogue on my disc at that point is when both the younger men repeat "Come on, Mr Farrell".

As you say, the 'Murphy' character is frequently addressed as Pat, and once or twice I think the 'Martin Gallagher' character is addressed as Mike. Could be an attempt to disguise identity, as they did with the couple who were obviously based on the Duff Gordons. The cast list onscreen doesn't include character names at all. There was quite a lot of opposition at the time to a film which portrayed real people in a real tragedy, especially from Harland & Wolff who refused to co-operate in any way.
 
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>>There was quite a lot of opposition at the time to a film which portrayed real people in a real tragedy, especially from Harland & Wolff who refused to co-operate in any way.<<

Except, of course, the officers, Thomas Andrews, Ismay, and the wireless. They must have been the exception, since they stood prominent in the story. It isn't surprising that the BBC (at that time?) would have chosen to have real British subjects portrayed in a movie of the tragedy. Hell, Lightoller was the hero of the story. Furthermore, there were very few Americans that I recall in this version, unless those few (James Dyrenforth, Robert Ayres, the Ryerson actor) were merely British actors with convincing 'American' accents.

Regarding the dialogue, that's strange. I could've sworn that Martin said "Murphy." I'll have to listen closely the next time I see it.
 
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Just a clarification above: I was referring to British subjects who had been deemed as heroes in the real account. I wanted to make sure that was understood. Sorry.
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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quote:

Except, of course, the officers, Thomas Andrews, Ismay, and the wireless. They must have been the exception, since they stood prominent in the story.
Interesting comment, Mark. I know not all the families of the Titanic's officers liked the idea of depicting these men on screen. Lowe's family in the UK did not wish to cooperate in the making of ANTR, and as we know he's not given a very prominent role in the movie (although I do like his scene in the boats!). Boxhall co-operated fully, and even brought aboard one of his colleagues to help (Commander Grattidge). Sylvia Lightoller visited the set, and endorsed the end result. As far as I know, the Moody family had nothing to do with it (although I know at least one member saw the final result). Pitman, I imagine, probably would not have co-operated with the filming. He gave the most minimal response he could to Lord when he was writing ANTR, stating to Lord (and mentioning to friends) that he had said all he had to say about the matter at the inquiries. He did not think much of the published work. But then, he's another virtually non-existant officer in the movie!
quote:

As for 'Paddy', to the English that's a generic term for all Irishmen. My own father, a Dublin man whose given name was Albert, was always Pat or Paddy to friends and family.
Absolutely, Bob. I came across an Irish born WSL officer who was known as 'Paddy' to his colleagues (he rose to the rank of Captain, I think). Bestic, another Irishman, recorded that virtually the first thing his fellow apprentices did when he signed on was decide that his nickname was to be 'Paddy'!​
 

Bill Willard

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Mar 24, 2001
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And let's not forget the most famous Paddy of them all...

You may see him in your yard on the morning after St. Patrick's Day...

You all know him... he's...

Paddy O'Furniture!

(sorry. I had to do it)
 
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>>I know not all the families of the Titanic's officers liked the idea of depicting these men on screen.<<

I am aware of this. That's why I think it's interesting, since every officer was specifically mentioned anyway(though a few had minimal exposure). One example would be the briefing on the bridge. Capt. Smith clearly announced the name of each officer, and there were actors there representing each one. The politics behind the relationship between the producers and the families of the actual survivors must have been, to say the least, incongruous.

By the way, Inger, how do you do the "quote"-indentation thing? I think it's better than using arrows, but I don't have that function. Is it an outside computer program? Just wondered.
 
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My point is this: The only real people, or figures from the actual account, that were presented in the movie were the officers, Andrews, Ismay, and Sylvia Lightoller. I just think that it's interesting that, despite opposition, these people were portrayed anyway, yet, at the same time, the identities of actual passengers were carefully disregarded for composite or fictional equivalents. I was making an observation that the practice of not using the actual people as characters was not employed with complete consistency. It appears that the decision of whether or not to represent an actual person was contingent on the individual and his particular significance in the incident, unless there is something of which I am unaware.
 

Bob Godfrey

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No real people represented apart from the officers, Andrews, Ismay, and Sylvia Lightoller? You must have noticed 'Molly' Brown, Gracie, Peuchen, Guggenheim, the Strausses, Dr O'Laughlin, Charles Joughin, QM Rowe, Hichens and others?
 
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Ah Yes! I stand corrected. Thanks Bob. Still, my point stands. Such a practice seemed inconsistent.

Aside from Rowe, though, were any of these mentioned by name(aside from the cast list, that is--in the movie)? I don't remember.

I'm not trying to make a mountain out of a molehill, just trying to express an observation. Now, what other subjects are there?...
 

Bob Godfrey

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Apparently, it was the recommendation of legal advisors for the Rank Organisation that the characters of Ismay and the Duff Gordons, who appeared under those names in the original script, were changed to 'The Chairman' and 'Sir and Lady Richard'. Bearing in mind that a case for defamation cannot be made on behalf of a deceased person, I'm not sure what consequences they had in mind. Perhaps one of our legal professionals could advise.

On another matter you raised, Mark, the director Roy Ward Baker acknowledged that there was a far greater emphasis on the British passengers in his film than in the 1953 Hollywood version, which had excluded virtually everbody except the Americans. Understandable, as both films were aimed at their home markets. As expected, ANTR acheived critical acclaim but poor box office results in the US, where its morbid content, lack of Hollywood stars and lack of Technicolor kept audiences away in droves. Bill MacQuitty's insistence that the ship was the real star didn't help.

That said, ANTR shares with Cameron's film a 3rd Class contingent in which the British (by far the largest group in reality) are almost invisible, represented in ANTR only by an elderly but vociferous Scotsman while Polish and especially Irish characters got the more prominent roles. And Baker felt that one of the most important scenes in his film was that in which, just before the ship goes down, those remaining on board begin to pray in a great variety of languages - an effective reminder that Titanic wasn't a purely Anglo-Saxon affair.
 

Inger Sheil

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I wasn't disagreeing, Mark - I was just offering a few observations on the different attitudes were from the different families and individuals, and agreeing that it was interesting. I was also running with the idea of possible dynamics between screen time/cooperation of families (although McQuitty suggested that, for example, the allocation of Lowe lines to Lightoller was to enhance his role and provide the audience with an 'entry point' into the story).

The 'quote' indentation is html code - works like:

\ quote{scintillating text here!}

Just close the gap between the forward slash and the word 'quote'.
 
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BOB--Thanks for the background on that. I figured that there were some legal stipulations which explained it. The fact that your from the UK (British?) suggests to me that you would naturally know more about the history behind that.

INGER--I noticed that Lightoller received the privilege of telling off "The Chairman," who was getting under-foot. I immediately picked up on the producers' intention to place Lightoller in the spotlight, considering that Lowe was the individual who originally cut Ismay down for causing interference. However, IMO, I don't think that it would have been necessary, for entry point effect, to give Lightoller that line or to show him having 'control,' per se, over everything. Making Lightoller 'larger-than-life' would have also made him appear unrealistic, if that makes any sense. I would've allowed Lowe to keep the line and emphasized Lightoller's policy of "Women and Children Only/First" while playing on his experience at sea by adding more dialogue to suggest this (we can't say that the real Lightoller didn't mention anything about his past experiences, because we honestly don't know everything that Lights said during the Titanic voyage, so such dialogue wouldn't have been outside the realm of realism or possibility). The discussion Lights has with Gracie in Lifeboat #12 (I read in a few sources that 12 was the boat that picked up those on C.B) after the sinking reflects Lightoller's regret over the incident and shows how the sinking overwhelmed even him. This scene allowed Lightoller to react to the whole thing as the human that he was instead of appearing like some uneffected 'superhero.' Does this make any sense?

By the way, thanks for the inside tip on the HTML. I know basic HTML, so I understand it. I didn't know the one for quote indentations before, so I appreciate the new information.
 

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