Favorite passengers of the Lusitania


Delia Mahoney

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Oct 10, 2003
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My favorite person who travelled on Lusitania's board is poor Lady Allan because she had very tragic life - her two daughters died but she survived...
What are your favorite passengers or crew members?

All the best,

Delia
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Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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For me, it would be Lusitania's wireless operator, Robert Leith. I find it remarkable that he managed to take a picture of the ship hours before the torpedoing and during the sinking, although the film probably do not exist today.
 
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Miranda Martin

Guest
My favorite passengers are Joan Adams, Eva Grandidge and Nina Tierney.
 
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Miranda Martin

Guest
Joan Adams: because of the way she died
Eva Grandidge: because she was soooooooooo cute
Nina Tierney: I don´t really know why but she still sounds interesting.
 
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Doni McLerran

Guest
Well, in my strange obsession for Catholic priests from the Edwardian period who die aboard ocean liners (i.e. Byles on the Titanic), I hope I don't have anyone rolling their eyes when I admit that my favorite passenger from the Lusitania would have to be Father Basil Maturin.

Good reason, though. I have a really good book that was written by Maturin. I found the book in a Catholic bookstore and bought it because of the content. Only afterward did I find out about the Lusitania connection.
 
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Holly Peterson

Guest
I've always been drawn to the children aboard shipwrecks, so I'd have to say either Helen Smith, Elsie Lohden, or Avis Dolphin. Probably Miss Avis Dolphin; she seems such an independent, charming and spirited gal, very much like Ruth Becker (one of my favorite Titanic passengers.)

And Miranda, I really like Misses Adams, Grandridge and Tierney, too. I often think about how heartbreaking it must have been for Joan Adams' mother to leave her little girl on that piece of wreckage ...
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

Guest
Elbert Hubbard was a very interesting gentleman who had founded a very early "hippy" commune, where people lived simply, farming and building thier own houses etc. He and his wife were aboard, sadly both perished in the disaster.Hubbard was a philosoper whe wrote at least one book and who published a journal or magazine which I think was posted to subscibers in the USA.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Apr 21, 2009
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Perhaps "favourite" is not the right word, but I have always been fascinated with the life events of Julia Sullivan, survivor of the Lusitania sinking along with her husband Flor. I know that she was luckier than many others who either died or lost loved ones in the disaster, but for Julia life took a strange turn. Born to relative poverty in Ireland, she took a risk in crossing the Atlantic as a teenager but stuck gold when she was hired by the Branders of Long Island soon after arrival in New York. She was nominally a home help, but the childless Branders treated her more like a daughter, taking her with them on their many holidays etc. For 8 years Julia enjoyed the kind of life she could only have dreamt about in Ireland - skating on the frozen Great Lakes in the winter, swimming in Florida in the summer, going to the Broadway plays etc. The Branders even supported her engagement to Flor Sullivan, getting him a job at the Stuyvesant. Then the Branders died within a short time of each other, but leaving Julia with a sizeable legacy in their wills. Before Julia had time to recover from her bereavement, Flor got word from Ireland that his own father had died suddenly. As the oldest son, Flor had to go back to claim the family farm or settle the inheritance to his wishes. After due consideration, the Sullivans decided to return to Ireland, with more than half-a-mind to settle things there and return to their life in America, if not right away certainly after the war. But they chose the Lusitania for the journey to Ireland and though both survived its its sinking, the ensuing trauma and the prolongation of the war for over 3 more years put paid to any plans to return to the US. So, Julia lived out the rest of her life in a similar mundane existence in County Kerry in circumstances similar to as had been before going to the US, losing a daughter - who had become a WW2 nurse - to an Air Raid in England and husband Flor soon afterwards. The 8 golden years in America with the Branders and then Flor was a distant memory.

In 2002-3, I tried to dig up some information on Julia's life in Ireland after her return. The local people were helpful...too helpful in fact because I started getting information on 2 or 3 Julia Sullivans! I had to give up in the end, but I don't think it will be too difficult to restart my research by going across to Ireland, something that I hope to do soon.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Apr 21, 2009
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>>>>>>Arun,
Senan Molony's book details what became of the O'Sullivans <<<<<<

Yes, I have ordered it. I hope that it gives some detail about Julia's 8 years in America in addition to the before and after.
 

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