Fifth Officer Harold Godfrey Lowe's Conduct

May 27, 2007
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Perhaps Inger does at that. Maybe the Comptons just gave him a match case. It was just a theory about there being no matches for the lanterns.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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You know, I never thought of the connection - but it was Sara Compton who recalled in her letter to Gracie that Lowe comandeered the matches from the occupants of Boat 14 (around the same time as he was warning the crew to leave their tobacco in their pockets, as it would just make them thirsty).

Matchboxes, like watches, were popular presentation items, however - the staff and pupils of his old school also presented Lowe with a gold matchbox.

Perhaps the best example of ironic presentations was discovered by Rosanne McIntyre when she was researching David Blair - the one-time Titanic Second Officer was later presented with a pair of excellent binoculars for his heroism in rescuing a man who had gone overboard!
 
May 27, 2007
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quote:

but it was Sara Compton who recalled in her letter to Gracie that Lowe commandeered the matches from the occupants of Boat 14 (around the same time as he was warning the crew to leave their tobacco in their pockets, as it would just make them thirsty).
Thanks Inger, that was probably the connection.

quote:

David Blair - the one-time Titanic Second Officer was later presented with a pair of excellent binoculars for his heroism in rescuing a man who had gone overboard!
I read about that here on ET. Wasn't he commended or something by the King after saving that crewman's life. Just jumped right in after him.​
 
Dec 5, 2008
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I also can't help but wonder if any of them even thought of the supplies in the boat. If I recall correctly, Frederick Barrett's testimony claimed that nothing from there had been touched, and I don't remember any other mention of the supplies from the survivors. Maybe they just weren't aware of them, or were so distracted they never thought to use them, or even remembered them?

Again, just another silly little theory. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong!
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Maybe they just weren't aware of them<<

More like they weren't out on the open ocean long enough for it to become a major issue. The boats and equipment had been inspected while in Southampton by a Board Of Trade representative before the ship sailed and all of it was there.

None of this means that a few odds and ends might not have been pilfered but I think it was more a case of unfamiliarity with the boats and what was available. The Carpathia's arrival a couple of hours after Titanic sank rendered it all a moot point.
 
Dec 5, 2008
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I was just reading through some of the officer's testimony at the American Inquiry, and according to Pitman, only some of the boats were equipped with lights, his being one without.

Senator SMITH.
Did you have any lights on No.5 lifeboat?

Mr. PITMAN.
I did not have a light in my boat; no.

Senator SMITH.
Do you know of any boats that did have lights on them?

Mr. PITMAN.
Yes there were several of them that had.

Senator SMITH.
But they did not all have lights?

Mr. PITMAN.
No.

Maybe #14 was also missing theirs?
 
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Trevor Rommelley

Guest
Re: Bertha Mulvihill's injuries. It has been said (and dammit, I can't find exactly where now!) that she was injured when someone dropped on her from above and the suggested candidate was Gus Cohen. However, according to this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mcy7NgoJP8Y&feature=related

Cohen dropped into the water after shinning down the falls and was picked up. Any comments?
 
Dec 5, 2008
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It mentions this in her biography here on ET, but it's all I can find.

>>She lost her trousseau in the sinking and somehow suffered a couple of broken ribs in the process of leaving the Titanic.<<

Wish I could be of more help - especially since I've heard of that before!!!!!
happy.gif
 

Tad G. Fitch

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Dec 31, 2005
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Hi Trevor, how are you? Good I hope. I am not sure who made the suggestion about the identity of the man who jumped down on her, but it almost certainly wasn't Gus Cohen, since Mulvihill was rescued in Lifeboat #15, and Cohen's accounts aren't consistent with this boat. Like the Youtube video you describe, I have seen Cohen's obituary, and it claims that he was picked from the water after sliding down "ropes."

Bertha Mulvihill herself claimed that a man jumped down on top of her as her boat was lowering away. She was also accidentally knocked down some stairs by a man who pushed past her in the rush to get up on deck from the third class areas. Bertha later told her family that she wasn't sure if her rib injuries were from one of these incidents, or a combination of both.

Take care,
Tad
 
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Trevor Rommelley

Guest
Hi Tad,
I'm OK thanks, how are you? I can't remember where I saw the story, but I think it was E-T, possibly in the last few months?

Come to think of it, it might not have been Mulvihill. I distinctly remember seeing a post saying something to the effect of "passenger X was injured when a man landed on her, and that man was Cohen."

Thanks!

Trev
 
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Caroline Mendes Ferreira

Guest
officer Lowe the night of the wreck

On April 14, 1912, the night of the sinking, Lowe was relieved by Sixth Officer Moody 8:00 and was asleep in his room when the ship hit the iceberg at 11:40. He remained asleep with collision and not wake up to a maximum of half an hour had passed, as he later explained: "We do not have police sleep much, and therefore when we sleep, we die." When Lowe finally awakened and realized the situation, he immediately got dressed, grabbed his gun and went to work. Third Officer Pitman accused of carrying lifeboat No. 5. Around 1:30 a.m., Lowe engaged in a conversation with the sixth Director Moody: When launching the lifeboat paragraphs 14 and 16 of the ship's port side, the two junior officers felt that this group of boats required to have an employee with them. Moody insisted that Lowe should start in lifeboat No. 14, and that he would stay in another. So far 14 lifeboat was being launched, things were starting to get ill on the boat deck, as most of the passengers began to realize that the giant ship was sinking. How lifeboat 14 was descending, Lowe used his revolver to fire three shots into the air in order to scare off a group of men trying to jump into the lifeboat.