First Class Smoke Room Furniture


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Brian R Peterson

Guest
Hi All!

I was wondering what color the furniture was in the First Class Smoke Room, I have seen it hinted that it was green, and that Olympics was brown but I have no of distinguishing which was which.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Brian,

Olympic's color illustrations show her 1st class Smoking Room's furniture green. It was hinted that Titanic's was brown or burgandy.

Daniel.
 
B

Brian R Peterson

Guest
I knew the furniture on Olympic was green from said illustrations, I have both in the form of period postcards.

However the same illustrations are re-labeled Titanic as well and this was source of my initial confusion.

Ken Marschall, in his cutaway painting of Titanic, has the Smoke Room furniture and carpet green and the Lounge furniture red with a light pattern floor, and this was cause of more confusion, from what I have gathered they should be the other way around, not to detract from Marchall's excellent work of course just as a general statement.

Best Regards,

Brian
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
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Then they decided to give the Titanic's Smoking Room furniture a different colour or what?

Thanks.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Jeremy,

They obviously did use different colors in the Smoke Rooms, but they kept the colors in the Lounge Room the same on both ships.

Ken's work is excellent, but as I have learned, usually when doing it, he was working with limited information, which is known today, but was not know then, which is why some of his work has errors. My guess for the Lounge's colors in the cutaway, is because of the color scheme used in the room today. During Olympic's life it was green, now they have red carpet and lighter furniture, so Ken worked with those colors.

Daniel.
 
B

Brian R Peterson

Guest
Hi Dan,

I figured that was the case, I myself almost used the current color scheme of the Lounge in a few of my works, its easy to base work on what you can rather than what you cant.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
B

Brian R Peterson

Guest
Hi All!

Here is my completed rendering, it is quite stunning - unfortunately it lost a lot of sharpness of the original when I had to reduce its size and quality for posting
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Best Regards,

Brian
 
B

Brian R Peterson

Guest
Why thank you Michael!
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I also recently completed a similar view of the Olympic's Smoke Room
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Best Regards,

Brian
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Do you have a website somewhere Brian? Some of your recreations have been on the large side which makes posting all of them here impractical because of the size constraints. A site of your own would be a good place to post everything you've got.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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All,

It's hard to say, but I think Titanic's Smoke Room would have looked better with green furniture after all. Who knows, maybe they did stick with green rather than burgandy.

Daniel.
 
B

Brian R Peterson

Guest
>Hi Nigel,

I am currently working on several First Class staterooms and other First Class public rooms. I recently completed the Portside Palm Court and the Reading & Writing Room. Once I get the time and effort together I think I will make a website posting the full size full resolution illustrations there, as most of the detail is lost when I have to reduce size and quality for ET.
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Best Regards,

Brian
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Brian, as a suggestion, you may want to thumbnail each of the illustrations you make on a homepage so downloading times don't become much of a problem. Especially for us poor blokes in Fred Flintstone Land who have to rely on dial up modems.
 

Ken Marschall

Member
Jan 8, 2002
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Just came across this thread. The wonderful color-tinted photo above (congrats, Brian) doesn't appear to have the red tiles at all. I just see blue and white.

Titanic's smoking room tiles can be spotted today at the wreck site, and they are only two colors -- a dark "peacock" blue (slightly phthalo blue) and the red (the usual slightly dull, terra-cotta red).

Given these colors all over the floor, dramatically different from the grey/buff used in Olympic, I would strongly vote for the "burgundy"-dyed leather upholstery. You can imagine how green upholstery would clash with such a red/blue floor.

But of course, that's only my notion. I have no proof whatever. I'm not aware of any contemporary account describing Titanic's leather in either the smoking room... or dining saloon...which is another bugaboo.

As with the smoking room, Olympic's dining room floor was one combination of colors (visible in the 1910 color publicity painting), and Titanic's was clearly another -- the recovered tile fragments are red, ochre and blue (the blue sections have somehow bleached out and turned whitish in the conservation process...they are very blue on the sea floor). With the red and blue being the predominate color on the floor (the ochre was only used in the small center "cross" design), we have the same conflict we had in the smoking room -- the usual green leather upholstery of Olympic's dining saloon would look rather ghastly in a room dominated by a red and blue floor.

You may be aware of the small photo reproduced on p. 217 of Peter Boyd-Smith's book "Titanic From Rare Historical Reports." It is what appears to be a studio photo of an intact 1st-class dining chair recovered by the Mackay-Bennett. Although no source is provided, the image apparently appeared in a Halifax paper (I'm guessing) shortly after the cable ships returned from their grim search for bodies.

The original caption for the tiny photo says only that it is "an oak chair" but doesn't mention the color of the leather.

It is surely the largest, most intact piece of Titanic furniture to survive the sinking and must have been a prized possession for whomever ended up with it, no doubt labelling it on the bottom as coming "from SS Titanic" as most all other recovered wood fragments were.

Whatever became of this priceless, surely coveted artifact? With it almost certainly labelled as being from Titanic, who would ever abuse and then toss it?

I have written to authorities in the Halifax area to see if anyone knows anything. One response so far is negative, never heard of it.

If any fragment of the original leather survives on this chair (likely under it), it would answer this vital question about Titanic's interior design and color schemes.

So far, this lone, tiny, published photo is the only indication this chair ever existed. It may be sitting at this moment, alone and forgotten, in some Nova Scotia attic. Sigh.

As with the smoking room, I suspect Titanic's dining saloon chairs were upholstered in a reddish-dyed leather, not the green used in Olympic. It only makes sense. But it's a daring leap to make that call without a shred of archival or eyewitness evidence.

This surely would have been mentioned earlier in this thread, but it doesn't hurt to ask: Does anyone know of a published account that mentions the upholstery colors for these two rooms in Titanic? Any survivor account, or letter mailed from Queenstown? The briefest passing comment may provide our answer.

Another possibility is to see if the company that provided the furniture for these two rooms is still in existence and still has its old records. The original order from White Star would surely specify the leather color.

Ken
 

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