First liner with watertube boilers


Lucy Burkhill

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Mar 31, 2006
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Hi all,

Could anyone please tell me when the first commercial passenger liner to be equipped with water-tube, (as opposed to the traditional Scotch boilers), was built?

Many thanks,

Lucy
 

Tom Bates

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Aug 16, 2002
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The first Liner with water tube boilers was the Guion liners Montana & Dakota in 1873. But the First major liner to use them was the Imperator (Berengaria) & Vaterland(Leviathan) & Bismark(Majestic) in 1913
 

Lucy Burkhill

Member
Mar 31, 2006
166
1
113
Thanks, Tom!

>>The first liner with water tube boilers was the Guion liners Montana & Dakota in 1873<<

This is certainly interesting that they were used as early as 1873. When exactly was the water tube boiler invented? I remember once reading in a book that I have somewhere but can't for the life of me find, that it was invented sometime in the 1880's by a British man, Alfred Yarrow, do correct me if I'm wrong. Were the boilers in the liners you mention of the Yarrow type as used in the Queen Mary, or some other kind?

Lucy
 

Tom Bates

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Aug 16, 2002
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HI sorry I have been busy. The boilers for Montana & Dakota in 1873 were not Yarrow type. I don't know off hand what type they were. You should get the book "power of the great liners" It is just about The machinery of Atlantic liners (and my primary reference source. I will look up for the information later ( I will try to copy a drawing of the boiler but I must send it private by email because it is copy righted) and about when the water tube boiler was invented, I will also look for that info. Tom
 

Lucy Burkhill

Member
Mar 31, 2006
166
1
113
Hi Tom,

This book you mention, "Power of the Great Liners", sounds interesting. Who is the author, and is it still in print? Thanks for your help with answers to my question.

Regards,
Lucy


Lucy
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Lucy, the author is Dr. Denis Griffiths and unfortunately, the book is out of print. You can still get a copy by way of the used book networks. (I got mine through Amazon). It won't be cheap but you may not have to mortgage your metaphorical arm leg and firstborn to get it. (Maybe your arm!)

I think you'll find it's well worth it if you have an interest in shipboard engineering. Steam at Sea by the same author is also worth getting.
 

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