Fishing off the Titanic ?

Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

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They did supply the boats with sails and Col. Peuchen was a trained yachtsmen. So they at least had that going for them.
Major Peuchen, as he was known aboard the Titanic. He wasn't promoted to Colonel, until after the disaster. Peuchen was a skilled yachtsman but wasn't nearly as effective as he could have been in lifeboat 6. Margaret Brown took more of a leadership role, getting the other women to row.
 
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Sam Brannigan

Sam Brannigan

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Major Peuchen, as he was known aboard the Titanic. He wasn't promoted to Colonel, until after the disaster. Peuchen was a skilled yachtsman but wasn't nearly as effective as he could have been in lifeboat 6. Margaret Brown took more of a leadership role, getting the other women to row.
It's interesting that he never raised a sail like Lowe did. Perhaps Mrs. Brown shot him down as the rowing was keeping passengers warm.
 
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

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It's interesting that he never raised a sail like Lowe. Perhaps Mrs. Brown shot him down as the rowing was keeping passengers warm.
According to Peuchen in his testimony, the mast and sail were removed from the lifeboat prior to it being lowered. Margaret Brown reportedly encouraged Peuchen to row, but claimed he was tired. However, I do not know if that is factual as it has been said that Margaret over exaggerated her efforts in boat 6.
 
LydiaMaria

LydiaMaria

Lydia Maria : Realtor to the Stars
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I'm sorry but thinking someone could drop a baited fishing line 30 or 40 feet over the side of this enormous ship while going at a full clip in order to catch a fish is absurd on the face of it.
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

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I think I figured it out. Maybe you could fish for these. Although the fishing pole might eerily look like an 870 Wingmaster. Cheers.
11

P.S...I never got tired of watching these when I was at sea.
 
Stephen Carey

Stephen Carey

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Fishing off a ship doing 20 knots... No.
Fishing off the after end had the chance of a fishing line getting wrapped round one of the shafts. Not allowed or necessary.
Any fish magically caught by rod and line off a ship at that speed was a particularly stupid fish and, if given to the galley staff (who had umpteen different kinds of fresh fish in the cold rooms to choose from) they would have binned it and given you sole meuniere instead. If it was on the menu...
My company Canadian Pacific had two tankers moored close to oil rigs as shuttle and storage tankers, and they caught vast numbers of fish. The company forbade it as - typical HSE that was coming in in those days - there was a risk of infection from it... What the difference is between a North Sea cod caught by a rod and line, and one caught by a trawler - gutted, chilled, handled, sold, transported and acquired by a ship chandler and shipped to the ship by helicopter, was difficult to conjecture. Needless to say, it was ignored.
On another ship at anchor off Capetown our Chinese crew ignored the same directive and caught hundreds of fish, which were then placed on boards to dry out in the sun. The stink may have been perfume to Chinese olfactory organs, but not to ours!
Then again up the St Lawrence and (topically for this forum) stopped in ice (-21°C air temperature), the crew hauled in a 6lb plaice which stuck to the deck as it landed. The chefs chipped it loose with a shovel and I went into the galley to see how it was going. The plaice steak in the pan was part cooked at the bottom and still twitching at the top. Freshest fish ever!
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

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Interesting. If I could and it was practicle I would have had a line in the water. I was told that the power plants we had on the coast that had intakes from the ocean...well to make a long story short they had some really good fish frys on backshifts. Includeing west coast lobsters.
 
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