Floating debris

I have a piece of coal that has provenance as being from Titanic. It is just a little sliver. Who knows maybe it isn’t real, and all the paperwork is made up, but I like to believe it is.
They brought up a lot of that coal to sell so there's a good chance its real. People will try to counterfeit anything but I haven't heard of a market in fake Titanic coal. RMS Titanic Inc sold it as way to raise money for future expeditions as so the story goes.
 
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I have a piece of coal that has provenance as being from Titanic. It is just a little sliver. Who knows maybe it isn’t real, and all the paperwork is made up, but I like to believe it is.
I just posted today (Dec 29) a couple of thoughts on your questions regarding the provenance on the coal, posted in the "Items that require identification..." forum, the "Titanic coal" subject. I picked up a discussion started a long time ago that has lain fallow.
 
Looking back its really interesting that before she was found, nobody really looked into the kind of debris that was found at the surface. That nobody seriously investigated and asked the question"if the Titanic sank completely intact why was debris from deep inside the ship floating on the surface?" Cork from food storage, the barber pole, and most telling, several chairs from the dining room which would have been too big to float out through the portholes etc etc. Splintered wreckage recovered from the lounge and staircases should have tipped people off that this sinking was not as neat and clean as we have made it out to be.
 
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SDRancher

Member
Looking back its really interesting that before she was found, nobody really looked into the kind of debris that was found at the surface. That nobody seriously investigated and asked the question"if the Titanic sank completely intact why was debris from deep inside the ship floating on the surface?" Cork from food storage, the barber pole, and most telling, several chairs from the dining room which would have been too big to float out through the portholes etc etc. Splintered wreckage recovered from the lounge and staircases should have tipped people off that this sinking was not as neat and clean as we have made it out to be.
I would have to disagree with you on the idea that most or even many thought the sinking was neat and clean. Based on the eyewitness testimony they had a pretty good idea the ship split but they had no way to know it completely separated until it was discovered. Like you said the flotsam from the wreckage would've likely given them more evidence of splitting open but none to confirm complete separation.
 
This is Robert W. I,m posting a reply this way because for some reason there is a glitch when I try to log on normally. My reference to the sinking being neat and clean was not directed at the survivors, but to the public at large during those pre discovery days.
 

Jim Currie

Member
"as we got towards the centre we saw one man there. I have since found out he was a storekeeper; he was on top of a staircase; it seemed to be a large piece of wreckage anyhow which had come from some part of the ship. It was wood anyhow. It looked like a staircase. He was kneeling there as if he was praying, and at the same time he was calling for help."
 
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