Flowers


Lee Gilliland

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Feb 14, 2003
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The table lamps might have been shaded candles - they were thought to be very po-po at around that time, and would have been used exclusively for dinner.
 

Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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From the Father Browne photo it appears there were no table lamps or flowers on the tables of the 1st-class Dining Saloon. There might of been flowers in some areas, like the shelves in the private dining alcoves on the sides of the Saloon and also on the oak sideboards but haven't seen any on the tables what so ever.

All the best,

Nigel.
 

Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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Also note, even with the photographs of the Olympic's Dining Saloon set up before dinner there are no vases for arranged flowers that can be seen, only the usually china set up. I think those specially tucked napkins that sit on the plates were the feature for the tables.

Nigel.
 

Kris Muhvic

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Sep 26, 2008
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George-

It might seem strange (or fitting?) to speak of flowers when just this morning I awoke to snow all over the place! Oh well, it melted by noon: schizophrenic weather in MI as usual!

Back to boutonnieres; yes "likely" is the operative word here. I did find a little something in "Titanic Voices", which I believe the folks at "Last Dinner" must have picked up on. The nursery F.G. Bealing and Son was founded in 1890 and supplied flowers, potted plants, etc., first to the Union Line. It does mention that Union became Union Castle after 1900, and "In those early days first class male passengers might also find a Bealing 'buttonhole' by their place in the dining saloon." Bealing and Son started to supply White Star in 1907.

Two things: "...early days...", would that mean before 1900? As regarding red or any color of carnation, I have no idea (I prefer a simple white rose bud: compliments the starched shirt. Like I habitually wear a boutonierre!). Bealing and Son went out of business in 1963, I can't say if records exist for Titanic's boutonierres!

Take care! And spring will be here...someday!
Kris
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Kris!

Thanks very much for the extra info.

>Take care! And spring will be here...someday!

I didn't know you lived in Ferndale! Be careful driving on the icy roads in the morning -- the bridge I have to cross in order to get to work was closed yesterday because of a multi-car slip-and-slide accident right on the bridge. :)

All my best,

George
 
Nov 22, 2000
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George, Next time read the sign properly "Restricted Access - Positively No Behes"

Geoff (sitting here with all the windows open on this lovely spring morning!)
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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>Geoff (sitting here with all the windows open on >this lovely spring morning!)

... thus presenting an excellent target to anyone who might saunter down the street carrying a custard pie.
 

Kris Muhvic

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Sep 26, 2008
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George-
Thank you for your concern; I have an easy route down 9 mile (the Eminem sequel!) to Southfield- I should be alright, don't worry about me
happy.gif


Shelley!
Forgive my lapse here, I feel terrible! You may pin a dozen carnations on me if you like! There are buttonholes still stiched on some suits; however most have not been cut (just the stitching: no hole!). I wonder how many even know what they are-- "uh, dude! They screwed up the button-thingy! Check it out!"

All, take care-
Kris
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Here's a very late response to Lee's question about flower arranging which started this thread. When searching through Violet Jessop's autobiography for some quite unrelated information, I came across her reference to the arduous task of having to find receptacles for and to arrange the large quantities of flowers which arrived as parting gifts for passengers, especially when the recipients demanded tall vases. White Star had only a small stock of vases per section, and nothing more than 12 inches high. This called for drastic attacks on the long-stemmed American Beauty roses, which did not go down well with the clientelle. Violet adds that, much as she loved flowers, she was often tempted to consign some of them to the porthole. Maybe that explains some of those floating blooms we've heard about!
 
Jun 4, 2003
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Hello everybody, I was just wondering: could any passenger order some flowers to be sent to his cabin or to someone else during the voyage or could he even select the kind he desired? Just courious ...
George!
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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George, somewhere in this thread Shelley has posted a link to a story about just such a servce on the Majestic in the 1920s - the ship even had its own greenhouse! The Titanic was not so well equipped, but it did keep stocks of flowers for use as decoration in various locations, and even if it wasn't official policy to sell flowers or fruit to passengers I reckon an enterprising steward would be able to improvise and come out of it with a good tip!
 
Oct 12, 2004
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I noticed while reading through some Eaton & Haas info. that 500 glass vases were brought on board. Now without anything concrete as to their usage, it would seem that at least the intention of having centerpieces was there. By the way, this is my first post, though I have been reading through this site for quite some time.
 
Jun 4, 2003
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Hello! What about potted plants? Where could one find them? In public areas only? How about the flowers in staterooms? Which kind was the most favorite? Could you find them on board? Were the cabins equiped with vases? Thank you !!!
 
May 25, 2007
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George, I believe there were potted plants on the Private Promenades of the B-Deck Parlour Suites, one plant in each corner. It also appears that there were potted plants in the Restaurant Reception Room, also on B-Deck. There might have been some in the Main Reception Room on D-Deck, but I'm not for sure. According to deck plans, there were also potted plants in the Verandah Cafe & Palm Court and the Reading & Writing Room, and maybe elsewhere.

I imagine that flowers would have been brought to the First-Class Staterooms, either as gifts or on request.

Maybe someone more learned on the subject could help.
 
May 25, 2007
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Hi again George,

I just checked some deck plans and on G-Deck (amidships, just forward of the Alternative Second or Third Class (Counted as Third) accommodations), there is one room labeled "Passengers Fruit & Flowers".
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Potted palms were found in every chic interior during the late Victorian and Edwardian Eras - many prestigious hotels and ocean liners featured 'palm courts' where ladies and gentlemen could take tea in leafy surroundings.

As far as I am aware, and as Jack has quite rightly said, greenery was most in evidence in the main Reception Room on D-deck, the Restaurant Reception Room on B-deck, in the Reading and Writing Room and on the private promenade decks of the suites occupied by Ismay and the Cardeza party. The walls of the Cafe Parisien and the Verandah Cafe were also trained with climbing ivy, although I suspect that the trellises were still rather bare during the maiden voyage of the 'Titanic'.

The question of whether the tables in the first-class Dining Saloon and Restaurant were adorned with flowers has been explored in some detail on other threads. In their accounts of the sinking, passengers like Lady Duff Gordon and Mrs Douglas certainly recalled roses, daisies and daffodils on their tables although, for some reason, I find myself doubting this - it would surely have been difficult to keep the flowers looking fresh during the five-day voyage and the cost of changing the blooms regularly would have been prohibitively high.

A book called 'Titanic Voices', published around 1998 or 1999, contains much information about the nursery which supplied all White Star vessels with pot-plants and flowers during this period.

It was common practice for wealthy passengers to receive 'bon voyage' bouquets from their friends on sailing day. Many first-class staterooms would have been festooned with flowers and the 'Titanic' would have carried hundreds of vases to accommodate these. I seem to recall that Violet Jessop (as a stewardess, the duty of filling the vases and arranging the contents would have fallen to her) complains about the custom of sending 'bon voyage' bouquets in her memoirs.
 
S

sashka pozzetti

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I was curious about this, because Lucile was very specific about daffodils, and also strawberries, when she didn't mention many other details. So I did some research on the internet and discovered that you can buy daffodils by post! Delivery time is up to 2 days. I suppose that daffodils, and roses too (also can be posted) are maybe specifically suited to this use, and have good long-lasting qualities. If they were bought still in bud to the ship, then kept in cold store I would think they would come into flower gradually and last a couple of days. This would be enough, and if they were only in First Class, and if you had a mixture of flowers,and maybe leaves or some other long lasting flower to pad them out, you would not need that many, don't you think?
 
Mar 20, 2007
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A combination of roses, daffodils and daisies strikes me as both unattractive and improbable - perhaps this is why I am reluctant to credit the testimony of Lady Duff Gordon and Mrs Douglas. I can't help thinking that both women 'generalised' the floral arrangements in their recollections of that last dinner - after all, everybody can picture a rose and a daisy. I could be wrong!

Didn't the girls from the Paris branch of Lucile present Lady Duff Gordon with a massive bouquet of lilac prior to sailing? Her cabin on A-deck must have smelled particularly sweet - although it is worth remembering that lilac is held by some to be unlucky...

Your idea about cold store is a good one.
 

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