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Damon Hill

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Jun 13, 2004
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It is a long while since I read their testimonies, but when they refer to the various different types of flowers on the tables, I dont think they meant all of them being in the one arrangement. I know somewhere I read about the tables in the Dining Room being laid Sunday night for breakfast on Monday morning (which of course never happened) and that daffodils had all been put on the tables. I could well be wrong in this but from memory Lady Duff Gordon recalled there being 'American Beauty roses" adorning her table in the Dining Saloon the night of the sinking. As i said..I could well be wrong though !
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Maybe. Perhaps somebody on the board could supply us with the proper quotation from 'Discretions and Indiscretions'? The idea of daffodils on a breakfast table sounds delightful - very cheerful and spring-like.

On the other hand, I am positive that Mrs Douglas recalled daisies and roses together in an arrangement. If memory serves, her exact words appear on the first page of 'Last Dinner on the Titanic'. I can picture the roses - but what might the 'daisies' have looked like? Obviously not the tiny 'common or garden' variety. Perhaps Shelley or somebody who knows the subject better than I can offer some suggestions?
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Stupidly, I neglected to 'read back' on this thread. I see that all of the issues we're discussing have been covered already!

Apologies.
 
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sashka pozzetti

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To add to my comments about a cold store, I also discovered something that I didn't know before, which was that cut flowers have problems with air bubbles. So if you cut them under water, or use various other techniques,lke re-cutting or sealing,they last longer too. :)
 
Aug 29, 2000
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Oh this flower business has been a bone of contention for a long time. Daffodils, by the nature of their delicate, tubular stems like a soda straw, need to be in deep water. Daffs do not make very good flowers to mix in with other flowers with woody stems, like roses. I have seen some silver White Star budvases, and a few daffs in one of those might have been practical. Daffs also do not have too much of a shelf life, nor do they travel very well and start to look shabby after 3-4 days, shriveling and turning brown on the edges.

The American Beauty rose was a red-hot favorite of the 1911-1912 period. Madeline Astor had bunches of them at Beechwood on her wedding day to JJ in Newport. On her way out the door to her honeymoon, she pulled a handful from one of the vases in the foyer to take with her. They have a good tight bud, and have "staying" power as well as being luxurious. I believe they would have been an excellent choice for First Class, as well as daisies, which are hearty and can stand up to anything. Daisies and roses are a happy mix together also. I once had a flower shop, and still do the posies for special weddings-and yes, there are tricks to prolonging flower life Sashka. Cutting underwater, cutting on a diagonal, removing all foliage from the stem which will be submerged, all help. I would bet that both daffs at one point, then table roses with daisies were used separately. The roses may have been on the tables, and daffs elsewhere in the decor. If those little candleshades were blush pink, the roses would have looked divine. I guess we will never really know the answer for sure.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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I'm here reminded of the most delightful anecdote related by Cecil Beaton in his enchanting 'Glass of Fashion'. In the drawing-room comedies of the Edwardian Era, it was very common for the curtain to rise upon the heroine (gowned by Lucile, naturally) arranging flowers whilst waiting for her lover. Indeed, this little vignette was used so frequently that it became rather stereotyped - certain actresses became highly skilled at this gentle art! According to Beaton, when the great Sarah Bernhardt appeared in 'La Dame aux Camelias', she managed to arrange an immense bouquet of roses without once looking at them. Such was her artistry that, when she had finished, the audience broke into spontaneous applause!
 
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