Food for the stewardesses

Mar 23, 2009
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Hi everyone
I got some information on the stewardesses' accommodation, but as for their food I haven't found any information so far. Does someone know if they had their own meals somewhere on the boat or ate only the left overs in their cabins?
Thanks for any help on that matter
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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Unlike the deck and engineering crew, the victualing crew had no canteen facilities of their own. They grabbed whatever might be available 'spare' in the kitchens, and often ate it in a hurry and on the spot. There were also service rooms in their own working areas where they could make tea, coffee and quick snacks for the passengers and doubtless for themselves also in quiet moments (if any!) At the end of the long working day they might take something back to their cabins.
 
Feb 21, 2013
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Lloret de Mar, Gerona (Spain)
Talking about Service Rooms, what is that sort of circle inside a rectangle that can be seen in most of them? A heater for preparing hot beverages? If drinks and snacks could be prepared in those rooms, what was the purpose of the Pantry? There were one of each for each section of cabins, in all classes, and they never got communicating doors, not even when they were adjacent. If their purpose was the same, why not unify them when possible so to make it a slight bigger?
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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The small pantries in the passenger areas for intended for the storage and/or preparation of snack foods and beverages. The rectangles with circles or smaller rectangles were probably sinks. The 'service' rooms with no furnishings (or maybe just a sink) were walk-in storage cupboards for items like mops and buckets - much needed during a rough crossing and not the sort of thing you'd want to see in a room concerned with food preparation.
 
Feb 21, 2013
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Lloret de Mar, Gerona (Spain)
Right, I didn't think of cleaning stuff... Also, someone suggested those tiny spaces could be in use by the boots polishers, do you think it was possible?

Was that type of service (tea, coffee and snacks in the cabins) complimentary like it is now in an airplane, or did passengers have to pay for it?
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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It was complimentary, but if a passenger made more than reasonable demands of this kind their bedroom steward who had to do the work of preparation, fetching and carrying would expect (but couldn't demand) a bigger tip at the end of the voyage.

Even in 3rd Class refreshments like milk for children and hot drinks could generally be obtained from the kitchens at any time and at no extra charge.