Fooling around

Tracy Smith

Tracy Smith

Member
Though it was a more conservative time than our own, I'm sure people even in 1912 had "one night stands", and the like.

I've always wondered how much of this happened aboard Titanic and how the various classes went about it.

In first and second class, would it have been possible for an amorous couple to gain access to an empty cabin for a few hours? So far as third class passengers, where could a couple have gone to have some privacy?
 
Paul Rogers

Paul Rogers

Member
Interesting question, Tracy.

"...where could a couple have gone to have some privacy?

I do hope no-one suggests the back seat of a Renault town car in the #2 cargo hold.
Wink
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
Strictly for fans of The Fast Show and 'Unlucky Alf'.

"Ah'm goin' t' tek ma lady friend into one o' these 'ere lifeboats fer an unforgettable night o' passion. We'll not be disturbed. They'll not be needing 'em on a ship that the Good Lord Himself couldn't sink."


"Eee, bugger!"
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Iain Stuart Yardley

Member
In A Night To Remember, a man dressed in pyjamas is seen tapping quietly on the door of a first class stateroom, and we see a woman's hand appear, to be kissed (?) by the man and led inside. Do you think Walter Lord portrayed this nameless couple upon hearing of some sort of affair on board the Titanic?

Cheers,

Boz
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
On White Star liners in 3rd Class there was a great effort made to safeguard the privacy of 3rd Class passengers by keeping the women and men apart expect in well-lit public spaces, and the crew were strictly forbidden from entering the passenger areas except in the course of their duties. This was in great contrast to the 'old steerage' still to be found on many vessels sailing from Baltic ports. On such vessels 'improper behaviour' in the steerage was not only permissable, but virtually compulsory! The following excerpts are from a report by a (female) agent of the US Immigration Commission, travelling incognito as a steerage passenger in 1908:

"At 8 each evening we were driven below. This was to protect the women, one of the crew informed me. What protection they gained on the equally dark and unsupervised deck below isn't at all clear. What worse things could have befallen them there than those to which they were already exposed at the hands of both the crew and the men passengers would have been criminal offenses. Neither of these decks was lighted, because, as one sailor explained, maritime usage does not sanction lights either in the bow or stern of a vessel, the two parts always used by the steerage"

"I can not say that any woman lost her virtue on this passage, but in making free with the women the men of the crew went as far as possible without exposing themselves to the danger of punishment. But this limit is no doubt frequently overstepped. Several of the crew told me that many of them marry girls from the steerage. When I insinuated that they could scarcely become well enough acquainted to marry during the passage, the answer was that the acquaintance had already gone so far that marriage was imperative".

"All that has been said of the mingling of the crew with the women of the steerage is also true of the association of the men steerage passengers with the women. Several times, when the sight of what was occurring about me was no longer endurable, I interfered and asked the men if they knew they might be deported were their actions reported on land! Most of them had been in America before, and the answer generally given me was: `Immorality is permitted in America if it is anywhere. Everyone can do as he chooses; no one investigates his mode of life, and no account is made or kept of his doings.'"
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Yuri Singleton

Member
"What happens at sea, stays at sea." Isn't that the marketing pitch White Star was considering at the time??

Or was it along the lines of, "If the boat is a' rockin'..." I can't be certain which.

:p
 
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david wilson

Member
Tracy,how does one make "it" last a few hrs???
regards.
dw.
 
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Yuri Singleton

Member
Ladies clothes of that time no doubt took hours to remove and then replace. Not to mention the vast amount of poetry that had to be read first before the girl would swoon.
 
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Shelley Dziedzic

Shelley Dziedzic

Member
http://www.fashion-era.com/la_belle_epoque_1890-1914_fashion.htm#The%20Edwardian%20Silhouette%201908-1913
Yuri- you started my day off with a good laugh! Yes, I imagine if any ardent fellow had intentions of some afternoon delight in a lifeboat, the feathers, hairpins and longline corset would have been daunting-not to mention hatpins, narrow-bottomed hobble skirts,etc. Like peeling layers of an onion. Still, I expect where there was a will, there was a way! I recall a great scene in A Night to Remember where Lightoller I think it was, discovered a steamy couple snogging blissfully in a lifeboat-at night of course, where cover of darkness helped a lot. In SOS Titanic Cloris Leachman had that great line to Emma Bucknell-"Don't you just know there 's so much love going on? ...a soft knock on the cabin door", etc. Conjurers up a sort of Edwardian Country House Party afloat. I bet the chap whose job it was to bend down by the cabin door and retrieve the boots outside waiting to be polished heard and saw a great deal- as did stewards and stewardesses! Cary Grant was not deterred in An Affair to Remember, and Betty Davis seemed to have a real good time on her cruise in Now Voyager. I remember a line , "It's considered bad form to continue an affair when the voyage has ended." Susan Saint James, bless her, "waited for a better offer" when Mr. Beesley suggested that empty cabin at the end of the corridor. Maybe getting there was half the fun!
 
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monica e. hall

Member
And Susan St. James wore a woolly jumper on board the Carpathia - which I always found curiously modern, but I don't actually think it was. I'm sure they did have jumpers. People are always much more contemporary than one thinks. I, for example, always thought vacuum cleaners were a mid-20th Century invention. Rubbish! In more ways than one - they were apparently well established in Victorian / Edwardian times ....still, if I remember rightly, Mr. Beesley (in the film) was most gentlemanly concerning Ms. St. James's reluctance to use the empty cabin. Not totally sure I'd be so virtuous myself. But's that's maybe because I know the outcome.
 
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Senan Molony

Member
>>"I've always wondered how much of this happened aboard Titanic and how the various classes went about it."<<

The first class did it, if one pressed
(She did not want her hair-do messed)
They did not bounce too much though, lest
They might be heard by all the rest.

The second class did it with a zest!
Both sides engaged and all caressed
They put the mattress to the test
And hoped none of their shipmates guessed.

The steerage, it must be confessed
Are just not quite so class-obsessed
The lady showed her naked best -
But Billy kept his vest.

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Bob Godfrey

Member
I'm very sorry, Sir, I thought you ordered a hot toddy. I'll be back with the totty.

97246
 
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