Fooling around


There is still some discrepancy about this. Although Mr & Mrs Spencer are quoted as being the occupants of Cabin B-78 in most sources, The Cave List has them in B-76. Furthermore, Etches would in all probability have known in which cabin the Spencers were and if they were indeed in B-78, would he not have remembered the fact later? The fact that Etches did not appear to know the occupants of B-78 - those who talked to him through the closed door - might mean that he already knew that the Spencers had left their cabin, which then might have really been B-76 as per the Cave List.

If that was the case, the question remains as to who was in B-78 when Etches knocked on the door.
they are the ghosts of the fur coat! no wonder it swam to collapsible A
 

JACQLINE

Member
Don't forget...there were nearly 900 crew members on the Titanic, and while I'm sure they all worked blistering schedules, they obviously had downtime (12 hrs on - 12 hrs off-duty?) That leaves a lot of room for extracurricular activities, including romance. Granted, it would require some ingenuity, but we all should realistically agree hanky panky happened in 1912 on a cruise just as it does today. And probably not just between crew members. Assignations no doubt could be arranged with passengers as well between passengers, whether for pay or pleasure. That nobody fessed up to any such thing during the investigations or the memoirs would not be surprising. It was certainly a different era, and few women would have anything to gain by such an admission, other than besmirching their own reputations. And so many of the men died in the sinking that they never had the opportunity to tell all.

Just my opinions. If anyone has other info, I'd love to read it.
 

Arun Vajpey

Member
Don't forget...there were nearly 900 crew members on the Titanic, and while I'm sure they all worked blistering schedules, they obviously had downtime (12 hrs on - 12 hrs off-duty?) That leaves a lot of room for extracurricular activities, including romance.
But the majority were men with only a handful of stewardesses etc. Rather out of proportion for romantic interludes, I'd say. Of course, if there had been men (there probably were) among the crew who were "otherwise" inclined in their preferences, the day and age would have made any hank-panky very risky.
 
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>> (12 hrs on - 12 hrs off-duty?)<<

It was more like 4 on and 4 off, if you were under the deck or engineering departments, and the hotel/victualling staff could be going on to all hours of the day or night. Occupational safety and rest standards are not quite what they are today, and deck/engineering was typically run to the point of near exhaustion when standing their watches and then to any of their non watchstanding duties. Somehow, they had to get some sleep in there somewhere and it wasn't a lot. As Lightoller put it, "When we sleep, we die!"

That doesn't mean there couldn't be some adult games being played between passengers and crew. I'm sure it happened but not as often as you might think. IF in the unlikely event somebody had the energy, it was still extremely risky business as even a hint of impropriety in that day and age could get you sacked and even black listed.
 
I've read about the watch schedules they had and can not really see any good reason they had such a schedule. I guess since they were only at see for a week or so they could get by with it. I couldn't imagine a schedule like that for us when we were at sea 100 days plus with only an occasional steel beach party to give us a break. But back to thread subject...I haven't read of any but I could see where crew members might have been involved in a relationship. Say a stewardess and a and another crew member who often worked together. Not saying that crew and passengers never hooked up but it was probably a pretty rare thing in those days. Not like what happen in the airline industry in the 60's and 70's. It was shag city for the aircrews from what I understand. Cheers.
 
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