Forward Grand Staircase Picture


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Jared Berger

Guest
http://www.euronet.nl/users/keesree/dome.jpg This is the forward grand staircase! This same picture is in my book (its way better quality), and you can clearly see a door near the windows, kind of behind the pole. I looked at my titanic blue prints and the aft. Grand staircase has no door there. also the blue prints show the places of furniture, and the chairs in the picture (there are 3) are shown in the forward grand staircase, and then i looked at the aft. grand staircase plans and it shows that it only has one chair. There are no windows in that area because in the aft GST, there is a room there. The pillars match up too. I really believe this is the forward GSC
 

Joshua Gulch

Member
Mar 31, 2001
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Jared,
Unfortunately, no known photos exist of Titanic's grand staircase. The photo indeed shows Olympic's foreward grand staircase, which was likely identical to Titanic's fixture. The aft grand staircase was similar, but less ornate, with the simple clock within a square.

Josh.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Jared,

That is a photo of Olympic's grand staircase which was taken when the Olympic arrived in New York on her maiden voyage. A good print of this photo can still be ordered from the Library of Congress.

The fore staircase on Olympic and Titanic had the 'Honor and Glory' clock panel, while it was the aft staircase that had the plainer clock panel. Both ships had the doorway where you see it on the starboard side.

Daniel.
 
J

Jared Berger

Guest
thanks for clearing it up for me, my book is wrong then
 

Mike McMillan

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Apr 30, 2003
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Some other minor distinctives:

On the clearer picture [http://www.lostliners.com/Olympic/Images/grandstair2.jpg] you can distinctly see -- even from across the room -- the large, dark swirly woodgrain spot in the panel to the left of the clock (just above the railing), like on all the other Olympic pictures. (We were discussing that when trying to identify that other picture with the two men.)

The forward dome was elongated. That resulted in two sections of straight railing (9 feet each). The aft staircase, with the round dome only had one section of straight railing. And the curved part of the railing didn't have a post at the spot where it curved back 90 degrees to meet the straight pieces, like the sharp angle and post in foreground of this picture.

--Mike Mc
 
J

Jared Berger

Guest
its Called Titanic: Legacy of the worlds greatest ocean liner, by Susan Wels
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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In defence of Susan Wels' book, there are a number of photos which are referred to as the staircase design used in both Titanic and Olympic. The only images specifically captioned as being from Titanic are pics of fragments recovered from the sea.
 

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