Framed Piece of Oak Handrail Genuine


Spencer Knarr

Member
Jun 16, 2004
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"This wonderful piece of history is actually autographed by this/these icons and comes complete with a certificate of authenticity."

Ummm....what?


I have serious doubts about this piece. My bet is it's Olympic wood slapped on a Titanic frame.

When buying Titanic items it's important to remember that you aren't just buying an artifact, you're buying a pedigree...and this piece doesn't have one.
 

Bill Sauder

Member
Dec 19, 2000
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Unless this artifact has a magnificently documented chain of custody going back to 1912, I would not consider buying it. That pattern of Olympic molding is very common.
 
Aug 14, 2007
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Thanks for the feedback.

This was what I thought as well, I just wanted to see if that was general consensus. How can one stop this sort of thing?
 

Bill Sauder

Member
Dec 19, 2000
230
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Realistically, there is nothing you can do... it's the nature of fools and their money.

And frankly, there's no thanks in it either. I used to be the curator on the Queen Mary, and several times a month I'd get somebody down at the ship with new purchases for me to authenticate. Why I wasn't asked BEFORE the purchase, I will never know.

My favorite story was about this guy that just few in from Taiwan with a big brass bell that was engraved QUEEN MARY 1929. He paid a fortune for it, and wanted to know where it was originally from and how it got to Taiwan. He got angry when I told him the bell was a modern reproduction. Not angry because he had been duped, but angry at ME for telling him something that just couldn't be true.
 
K

Kevin Saucier

Guest
From what I've been told and from studying one of the known authentic pieces a good thing to look for is; when two leaves meet at the tips, there should be to berries in between.

To elaborate on what my friend Spencer said above, artifacts are affordable...it's the provenance that costs. "Magnificently documented chain of custody" is a good choice of words!

Kevin
 
Jan 29, 2001
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My folks used to make regular visits to the CA Antique scene. My dear Mother was always on the lookout for Titanic. On one particular trip to Morro Bay, an Antique proprieter/LIAR sold my Mother a snuff can labled...Captains Office S.S. Titanic. She told my Mother the can was retrieved from a victim at the wreck scene. Upon her arrival home, and with much ado excitement she presented the can to me, unfortunately I had to break the bad news to her via my 1st edition of "Titanic Triumph & Tragedy" (Eaton & Haas). The woman slithered $40.00 from my Mother for the snuff can! And on a brighter note, in a seperate visit to CA my Mother found a front page newspaper clipping w/photo..."Titanic Rams Iceberg On Maiden Voyage" "It is believed all passengers have been saved and great effort is being made to tow the giant vessel to shoal waters off New Foundland". That clipping was a $10.00 purchase and well worth it!

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 

rene bergeron

Member
Jun 16, 2001
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Hi Graig, stay away from this one. I own a piece of grand staircase wood and it doesn't look at all like that. Also, the only staircase wood out there, like mine, comes from a from W. Parker. He made a from picture frame from it and if you ever get a piece, it will come with papers of authenticity as thick as a book. I know the guys that purchased the the wood in Canada and this is the only known staircase wood out there in public hands. The only other piece, which is quite large is in the Maritime Museum Of The Atlantic in Halifax Nova Scotia. Here is a link to a Facebook group about msome of my collection, this link should bring you to the picutre of the wood. The wood is on top of the picture of the frame it comes from. Let me know if you want a better picture.
http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/photo.php?pid=6521486&op=1&o=all&view=all&subj=88272009881&aid=-1&oid=88272009881&id=612555113
 

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