Funnel Flicks STILL steaming


Sep 2, 2009
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Don:

Off Subject:

I see you got the drift in you next post. Beatles/Lennon would be on my list of those who we will still be listening to.

However, the current new artists making new music as of the 21st century I don't think most of us will be listening to forty years from now this modern music in my opinion just doesn't have the staying power like the older stuff. How many of the current artist's today will even still be making music forty years from now? Most of the stuff from the eighties and early ninties is gone and forgotten so to say.

I must be I am mellowing in my old age - almost forty. LOL
 
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Anita Casey-Reed

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Hello -

OK, to address a few points that have come up recently: Granted, "Heaven Hop" is fairly lame, but you can't expect even Cole Porter to hit a home run every time. "High Society" was TCM last night, and I have to say that many of the songs in there were OK, but fairly forgettable.
As to no music worth listening to 40 years later - I think part of that depends on timing and part of it on quality. I'm a bit fan of Porter and Mercer, but I think that's a matter of standing the test of time for quality - lots of people still listen to Frank Sinatra, how many still listen to Dick Haines? (I think that was his name) The Beatles, Buddy Holly, again, songwriters that I think sound as good today as ever (again - how many people listen to the Beatles compared to, say, Jay and the Americans?) Being someone who was in high school during the late 80's, I have to say that I think some of those songs will make it through, but most won't, just like in every other era. My personal inclination is to say that U2 songs will stand up, but Ace of Base or Cinderella won't, but that's just me. However, I must be growing old, too, because I think about 98% of the songs on MTV now are just atrocious!
 
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Anita Casey-Reed

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Here's a question - any theory welcome. During "The Last Voyage" someone explains that Edmund O'Brien's character wants to save everyone because his father was a crew member on the Titanic. How did the very AMERICAN sounding character played by O'Brien have a dad as a crew member on the RMS Titanic? Any thoughts?
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Simple answer- his father may have stayed in the States after the inquiry, immigrated later, and the son was born here. His wife may have been American or British. Barbara Anderson, who was born in the USA had two very British parents who came over in 1911- and she has no trace of a British accent.
 
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Anita Casey-Reed

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True - I can't remember if they said the dad was ON the Titanic or DIED on the Titanic. I must have assumed he died, but you know what happens when you assume...
 
Apr 11, 2001
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His father would have had to have survived Titanic to have produced a son the age of the man in the movie. This is not one of my favorite movies - painful to watch or I would check out that line again!
 
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Anita Casey-Reed

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No, I didn't see much reason to watch it again either. I'm not sure if this really counts as a funnel flick, since it involves a Merchant Marine ship rather than a passenger liner, but I have to put in a good word for the WWII film "Action in the North Atlantic". Bogart, Raymond Massey, and a cast of Warner Brothers regulars (led by Alan Hale, Sr., of course) battle Nazis to deliver the goods to our Russian allies. AND for all you Cole Porter fans out there - Bogie meets his girl when she sings "Night and Day" at a rough NY bar!
 

Don Tweed

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Mar 30, 2006
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Music is everything!!!
And I agree with your stance on music today and back through the eighties.
Some will say that the 70's music offering was weak, but I have to disagree, the bands that erupted from the 60's were great!
The Guess Who will always be near and dear to me.
This is way off topic so I wil stop.
Just remember, the band played to the end, and music doth soooth, in my humble opinion!
-Don
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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A Star with something in common with Margaret
Mitchell and Barbra Streisand. A title with thematic links to the Gilligan's Island theme. A Titanic survivor who briefly became a Hollywood character actor- at least according to the pressbook for the film. I am talking about?
 

Jim Kalafus

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CLUES: The Sun ALSO rises for this leading lady.....

The leading man found his career in a tailspin a few years later.....

I'd be beating a dead horse if I told you who the Titanic survivor turned bit player was......

(Don't bother looking on www.internetmoviedatabase.com with Titanic Survivor as a keyword- I already tried and his 'survivorhood' is not mentioned in his online resume)

One soon-to-be-utterly worthless QM2 Maiden Voyage souvenier fold out deckplan to whomever gets this first!
 

Jim Kalafus

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TITANIC SURVIVOR TURNED MOVIE PLAYER: Another hint- this survivor also wrote a screenplay which was produced and directed by a director whose name is synomymous with misdeed. Made his own film debut in an appropriately named film, starring the famous uncle of a famous actress who sort of bears his name. Costarred in his next film with a 'new' actor who rose to the top, starred in a whale of a classic and then saw his career short lived.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Jim, possibly that debut film was Shipmates, starring Lupino Lane, uncle of Ida Lupino. In which case our man next appeared in Journey's End (another appropriate name) with Colin Clive, who later starred in James Whales' Frankenstein. He also wrote Gone by a Neck, which was directed by the notorious Fatty Arbuckle. Either this is a series of remarkable coincidences or the survivor might just be Thomas Whiteley.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Excellent, Bob- if you send me your address off board I shall send the QM2 deckplan, if you want it! Of the films 'Tom' Whitely appeared in, James Whale's Journey's End definitely survives, and Merely Maryann(Henry King, 1931)- the film of which I was speaking in the question- likely does too, and I am hoping to find a NYC archive with a print. The Titanic connection was mentioned in at least one Merely Maryann pressbook, and I suspect that, given the title, the connection may have been mentioned in whatever PR package was distributed with Shipmates.
 

Bob Godfrey

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An amazing revelation, Jim! I had no idea about Mr Whiteley's progression to Hollywood, but there is something in his photo (in a wheelchair at St Vincent's Hospital in New York) which suggests a man who doesn't conform to Violet Jessop's assessment of stewards as downtrodden and lacking all ambition. Must now get hold of a copy of Journey's End and look out for the 'Sergeant Major'!

For those not familiar with Tom: he was just 18 years old on the Titanic and a waiter in the 1st Class dining saloon. He was one of those hardy souls who survived against all odds by swimming to the upturned collapsible B.
 

Jim Kalafus

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It is fortunate he worked with James Whale. Journey's End can occasionally be seen, and next time it is revived I'll be watching for Mr. Whitely. He would be easier to find in Merely Maryann, but that movie has two things going against it-it was made when the popular Janet Gaynor/ Charles Farrell team was beginning the downslide, and it was made in 1931. The survival rate for late period silents and early 'talkies' is low, and the revival rate for the talkies of 1928-1930/'31 equally low since, honestly, most of them were not very good. Because Maryann had a reputable director (King) popular stars (Farrell and Gaynor) who gave excellent performances in other early sound films, was based on a proven vehicle (Book 1904- play 1915 with Flora Robson) and was produced at a point where films were finally 'finding their groove' again, there is a chance that it is actually watchable if preserved. Working against it is the fact that, by 1931, the vehicle was, frankly, creaky (orphan 'waif' who is old enough to marry finds love and overcomes a cruel world) and a vein which Mary Pickford had strip-mined ten years earlier. If it was not a hit, and if few prints were struck, finding a surviving one will, of course, be harder.

There is, of course, the major chance that "Tom Whitely" of film 'fame' and Thomas Whitely of Collapsible "B" are not the same man. I do not recall what he looked like in Journey's End, and neither the Merely Maryann press book nor the 1931 news articles (thank you Mike Poirier for providing them) ran a photo- there is a distinct possibility that A "Tom Whitely' coopted the story of THE Thomas Whitley as a publicity "leg up." Yes, believe it or not, sometimes these Hollywood types exaggerate their stories!
happy.gif
Will get back to the board on this after I locate the stills collection from Merely Maryann and Journey's End
 

Jim Kalafus

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Okay- so, at what point on film do the most disasterous aspect of the Ile de France's demise and the Athenia collide?
 

Jim Kalafus

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Well, the Last Voyage IS part of the equation. Now, just find the celluloid connection between the Athenia and that film, and you are on the right path. A hint? You can see this work every New Years Eve and New Years Day if you are patient enough. AND, within this work, a long time wish of Last Voyage viewers IS fulfilled.....
 

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