Funnel interior


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Colin W. Montgomery

Guest
This is a question for Mr. Stephenson or Mr. Andrews. I am making a cutaway drawing of the funnels, but I am uncertain as how to proceed. I know a lot about the funnels exterior and dimensions but the inside is a mystery. Also do you know if the funnels could be accessed from the inside as well? (only when they were inactive of course!)
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Sent to "Funnels & Whistles". Could have gone to "Modelling", but I'm not sure where it fits? Let me know, Colin, if you think it's better in "Models".
 
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Colin W. Montgomery

Guest
I think it was the right choice to put it here.
Thanks
 
Dec 23, 2004
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Most steamships have inner and outer funnels,the outer funnel is the eliptical one you see, the inner funnel is the part that carries the gases from the boilers. On Titanic the boiler uptakes were brought together under each funnel into one inner tube which carried right up to the top of the outer casing. There would be laddering inside for maintenance purposes, in addition of course there were the ladders on the front of the outer funnels to gain access to the whistles etc.
 
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Colin W. Montgomery

Guest
I greatly appreciate all responses on this subject matter.

Thank you again.
 

Noel F. Jones

Active Member
May 14, 2002
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If you have access to Ocean Liners of the Past; Olympic and Titanic (reprinted from The Shipbuilder by Patrick Stephens Limited:

Pages 44 and 46 reads: "The arrangement of uptakes, by which the smoke and waste gases are conveyed to the funnels, is necessarily of a very elaborate nature, no less than twenty branches being required to one funnel in the case of boiler rooms 3 and 4. The branches from the adjoining boiler rooms are united immediately above the watertight bulkhead separating the rooms, the bulkhead thus forming a valuable support to the uptakes and funnel above. One set of uptakes is shown in Fig. 46 and well illustrates their numerous ramifications. The four funnels have an elliptical cross section and measure 24ft. 6in. by 19ft. 0in. Their average height above the furnace bars is 150 ft. A striking photograph of the last funnel of the Olympic leaving the shops is reproduced in Fig. 47."

The working funnels had both an inner and outer skin, the inner to protect the visible paintwork from blistering and discoloration. Within the inner skin would be the actual furnace uptakes. In the case of the Olympic/Titanic there seems to have been only one uptake.

The photograph on page 48 shows the "Last Funnel of the "Olympic" leaving the Shops". As this seems to be a working funnel "last" should not be taken to mean "aftermost". The inner skin is clearly discernible, along with its staying, as is what I take to be the main - indeed only - furnace exhaust uptake. The after half of the inner skin is plated over. You should disregard the timber shoring at the for'd (temporarily upper) end as this would have been only temporary while the whole fabrication was got into position.

Fig. 44 on page 45 shows "Sections through Boiler Rooms Nos. 1 and 2." from which you should be able to derive a scale of the inner constructions above decks.

The arrangement of funnel stays (smokestack guys) from the staying band to the anchoring points at deck level can be got from the Profile in Plate III opposite page 120.

Noel
 

Noel F. Jones

Active Member
May 14, 2002
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I hasten to correct that I see no overt indication as to whether the structure shown on page 48 is aspected from the topside or otherwise. Also that it is customary to have the boiler flue(s) emerging towards the afterside of the cross-section thus reversing my exposition of cross-sectional aspecting above. Upper becomes lower and after becomes for'd etc. The partially plated decking gives me to believe we may be looking at the top end of the structure.

And, I omitted to add that the annular void between the inner and outer skins would in situ be bridged by the funnel cap, of which there is no evidence in the photograph. If we are indeed looking at the top end I can only presume that this was craned on after erection.

Hopefully I've got it right now but some shipyard men may be able to confirm.

Noel
 
Dec 23, 2004
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The space between inner and outer funnels on most vessels is not covered - there was no funnel cap on the Olympic Class vessels or on any other White Star ship for that matter. The picture on page 48 you refer to shows the after funnel, the top is nearest the camera. This only acted as a ventilator and the galley flue can be seen stayed to same. I suspect that the wooden packing at the top would be removed once the funnel was stepped. Only the after funnel had that plate on the astern edge, all the other funnels simply had bracing bars athwartships over the inner funnel. REMEMBER NO BOILERS EXHAUSTED INTO THE FOURTH FUNNEL!!!!
 
Mar 22, 2003
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www.titanicology.com
For those that have access to a copy of McCcluski's "Anatomy of the Titanic" additional views of the 4th funnel can be seen on pp. 72-73. The one photo on p. 73 shows the bottom of the funnel as does the one on top of p.72. The bottom photo on p.72 is the same as the one in the Shipbuilder, and shows the top of the 4th funnel. In all these photos the galley flue is clearly seen.

For those with copies of McCaughan's "The Birth of the Titanic" a photo looking at one of Britannic's funnels that served the boiler rooms can be seen on p. 116. The very large inner funnel section that carried the gases can easily be seen on the right hand side of this photo which clearly shows the interior at the bottom end of the funnel.
 
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Colin W. Montgomery

Guest
I do not have a copy of this particular work, but I do believe I know the photograph spoken of.

And, I can certainly understand funnel fires would be terrible!

Thank you again, everyone.
 

Elle Bee

Member
Jul 18, 2018
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The space between inner and outer funnels on most vessels is not covered - there was no funnel cap on the Olympic Class vessels or on any other White Star ship for that matter. The picture on page 48 you refer to shows the after funnel, the top is nearest the camera. This only acted as a ventilator and the galley flue can be seen stayed to same. I suspect that the wooden packing at the top would be removed once the funnel was stepped. Only the after funnel had that plate on the astern edge, all the other funnels simply had bracing bars athwartships over the inner funnel. REMEMBER NO BOILERS EXHAUSTED INTO THE FOURTH FUNNEL!!!!
Hello, Allan -

I'm a newbie researcher looking for information on the top & interior of the after/dummy funnel, and your information above is incredibly helpful (esp. about there being no funnel cap).
May I ask what the dummy funnel being "stepped" means? Can you kindly point me to a primary source that has any cite-able info/images about the 4th funnel?

I've studied the amazing Beveridge deck plans, but none seem to show the top or interior of the after funnel.
I've found a Harland & Wolff blueprint of a funnel online (attached), but it seems to be one of the working funnels, not the after funnel.

And I've seen images like these that seem very useful, but none cite a primary source with any authority:

1. Top (?) of 4th funnel, Olympic - source?
Titanic boiler room plans and systems

2. Bottom (?) of 4th funnel, Titanic - source?
Titanic Station: Titanic's Funnels, or Smokestacks

3. Worker atop the 4th funnel (?), Titanic - source?
Tumblr

Many thanks, Allan - or anyone who can help me find sources!

Best,
Laura

H&W_Titanic_Blueprints_Design+(18).gif
 

Elle Bee

Member
Jul 18, 2018
8
0
1
San Francisco
Hello, Allan -

I'm a newbie researcher looking for information on the top & interior of the after/dummy funnel, and your information above is incredibly helpful (esp. about there being no funnel cap).
May I ask what the dummy funnel being "stepped" means? Can you kindly point me to a primary source that has any cite-able info/images about the 4th funnel?

I've studied the amazing Beveridge deck plans, but none seem to show the top or interior of the after funnel.
I've found a Harland & Wolff blueprint of a funnel online (attached), but it seems to be one of the working funnels, not the after funnel.

And I've seen images like these that seem very useful, but none cite a primary source with any authority:

1. Top (?) of 4th funnel, Olympic - source?
Titanic boiler room plans and systems

2. Bottom (?) of 4th funnel, Titanic - source?
Titanic Station: Titanic's Funnels, or Smokestacks

3. Worker atop the 4th funnel (?), Titanic - source?
Tumblr

Many thanks, Allan - or anyone who can help me find sources!

Best,
Laura
Never mind on #1 & #2 - I found the images in the Harland & Wolff Collection, National Museums Northern Ireland.

But #3?
 

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