Funnel rigging

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Bob Godfrey

Member
There is really no cause for disagreement here. I stated that the signal halyards ran down from the signal stay to the Bridge. Specifically they ran to the wings of the Bridge. I said nothing about the roof.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>The final rigging plans. <<

See my reply above. It still remains operative. Plans are nice and show you the intent. Unfortunately, in the life of a ship, even one who's life was as short as the Titanic's, changes and modifications get made which either are nor reflected properly or even noted in any plans at all.
 
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TitanicNerd

Member
Ah, we agree now. :)
Ok, we know it ran down to there but did it go like this? One halyard going this way / and a little bit in front of that one was one going like \


Correct?
 
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TitanicNerd

Member
My knowledge is not good compared to you guys, I can agree. My proof is I have talked to Parks Stephenson about this, and he shared me a pic of the original rigging plans. No wires appear, but we talked about it and he said that tied up at the wings of the bridge, which Bob now agrees on. No need to fight, we just need to finish up the last question (Which I Asked Bob)
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
This should answer your question. It's a model, of course, but an accurate one. The portside signal halyard is indicated by the white arrow. It would be secured to a cleat on the other side of the short bulwark. Same arrangement on the starboard side.

Port wing 1

Port wing 1
 
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TitanicNerd

Member
Thanks! So the wires just went like this /\ ? Or did they go like this: One wire like this / and in front of it another wire like this \
 
David G. Brown

David G. Brown

RIP
The precise location of the tie-off cleats is a curiosity. However, signal halyards imply signal flags which, in turn, imply there must have been a flag locker. For flags the size of a ship like Titanic this locker would not have been insignificant in size. Even so, I've never seen any indication of where the flags for the flag halyards were stowed. Not that it changes the outcome of anything...just a curiosity.

-- David G. Brown
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
The deck plan shows a 'flag locker' against the inner forward wall of the wheelhouse on the port side. In the corresponding location on the starboard side is a 'signal locker'.
 
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TitanicNerd

Member
Wires at the very top of the funnel?

I know there were 6 wires on each side of the funnels, making 12 supporting wires in total. But I am looking at a rigging diagram and see 4 wires at the very top of the funnel. Apparently, these were used for painting the funnel. Were they temporary or permanent? They look kinda ugly to me.
 
Jim Currie

Jim Currie

Senior Member
Hello there.

There were two single sheave blocks fitted to each side/top, front and rear of each funnel. Through these was rove a 1" manila rope, the ends of which were brought together and made fast on each side of the boat deck when not in use. These were funnel painting/cleaning messengers. When in use, a bosun's chair would be attached to one end and a sailor with a bucket fool of soodgee (fresh water and washing soda mix) and soodgee rag would be hoisted to the top of the funnel. Once there, he would tie-off the chair with a special knot and lower himself down, in stages, cleaning as he went. Soot was a problem on coal burning ships, funnels and nearby structures were constantly needing a wash.
At other times, the fore and aft lines would be attached to each end of a stage (an 8' long plank with horns at each end and two sailors would haul themselves (sitting on the board) to the top of the funnel. Thereafter, they would clean or paint as necessary. At the aft and forward ends of the funnels, the messenger from each side would be used to support a thwartship stage.

Here they are in use:

Funnel cleaning015

Jim C.

Funnel cleaning015
 
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