Futility Wreck Of The Titan

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sharon rutman

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I'm not so sure about tha

I'm not so sure about that Randy. The turmoil in the Middle East has spead into the worst anit-semitic violence seen in Europe since the Holocaust. In France alone synagogues were torched and members of a Jewish soccer team were attacked. Part of the reason Al Gore did not win the presidency, I personally believe, is because he selected a running mate with the wrong last name -- Lieberman. True to form, the entire heartland went solidly for Bush. Books like Wreck of the Titan, I'm sorry to say, help mix mortar and concrete for evil places like Auschwitz. The last thing we need is to have anti- Jewish stereotypes reinforced by this trash.
 

Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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Kalman your offer was very

Kalman your offer was very kind, just the same.

Absolutely; I'm sorry if my message suggested otherwise.

MAB
 
Feb 14, 2011
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How many editions were there o

How many editions were there of Wreck of the Titan?

I suspect there was no 1898 hardcover- rather it was likly published in serial form. If Im wrong, please correct me.

There were variations of the 1912 reprint. The common red 'autograph' edition, plus a rarer blue covered copy, which I have. When did the yellow colored verion come out?

Regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
Nov 12, 2000
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Tarn,
there have been quite a


Tarn,
there have been quite a number of incarnations of Futility. these are the major editions that I am aware of:

1898, the first printing, probably as you suggested, in a magazine format.
1912, McClures. the famous "autograph" edition.
also 1912, Arthur Bird. the 1st British edition?
1974, 7 C's Press. the edition combined with Stevenson's Paranormal Experiences.
1991, Buccaneer Books. a reprint of the 1974 edition.
1995, 7 C's Press. the edition combined with Robertson's biography, Morgan Robertson, the Man.
1998, Virtual Ink. the 100th anniversary edition.

the complete story has also been included in several other books. it is in Spignesi's Complete Titanic and Gardner's The Wreck of the Titanic Foretold? to name just two.


and there are probably more editions out there that I have missed!

all the best, Michael (TheManInBlack) T
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Hi Michael!
I have a blue


Hi Michael!
I have a blue colored 1912 copy, bought from a local bookseller after he returned from a buying trip in England....The red 'autograph' edition seems fairly common...

So I suspect the yellow 1912 edition, as seen on your booksite, the common red 'autograph edition', and a blue 1912 edition I bought accounts for the 1912 variations..
Could there have been more??

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 

Kalman Tanito

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Jul 9, 2002
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There is also a green-covered

There is also a green-covered version by McKinlay, Stone, published around 1912.

Kalman
 

Kalman Tanito

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In the Marketplace group, Mich

In the Marketplace group, Michael Tennaro made an interesting remark about the red McClure's edition of Morgan Robertson's books, which I thought appropriate to me here to continue the discussion.

My question: what is the difference between the red cloth and red leather editions of the "Wreck of the Titan" (apart from the obvious, that is)? Was the whole set published in leather as well, and is it rarer than the cloth version?

As for the clipping of the autograph page, I DO have a McClure's "Sinful Peck" where the tipped-in autograph label does not appear to have been added at a later time.

Kalman

Posted on Friday, 12 July, 2002 - 10:38 pm:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
on this one, you need to make the distinction that you are looking at two different items in the picture. there is the gilt decorated red clamshell case. this is a leather box that was made by a professional book binder to hold the book itself. this box is modern. I don't know if it is brand new or not, but it is certainly not more than a few years old.

the only picture that shows the book itself, is the last one, and if you look closely, you will see that it is a faded red spine.

Kalman is 100% correct that the book itself is a typical McClure edition, which was done in 1912 both in red cloth and red leather. although I can agree that the clamshell case is indeed in excellent condition, the book itself certainly is not. it looks no better than "good".

as far as the tipped-in signed label, again Kalman is correct that this was probably clipped from the one book which included Roberton's autograph, which was the book Where Angels Fear to Tread. this clipping the signature and pasting it into the book is cheap. I have seen copies where the entire signature page has been removed from Angels and bound into Futility. there is nothing essentially wrong with that, as long as the seller tells the buyer that is what happened. there was never an official signed edition of Futility, so any copy that has the signature of the author has to have been added after the fact.

all the best, Michael (TheManInBlack) T
 
Nov 12, 2000
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Hi Tarn,
you asked about the


Hi Tarn,
you asked about the yellow binding version on my website - that is the 1912 British edition published by Arthur Bird. I am not familiar with the blue binding you mentioned. do you know who the publisher of that edition was?

Hi Kalman,
thanks for the information about the McKinlay Stone version. that is an edition that I was not aware of.

you asked about the McClure's 1912 edition. this is not an edition I know a whole lot about, so for what it is worth, here is what I believe to be true. the edition was done both in cloth and leather. aside from the bindings, the editions were otherwise the same. the leather version is harder to find than the cloth, but neither is really scarce.

oops, gotta get to work!
all the best, Michael (TheManInBlack)
 

Smith Mize

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Dec 20, 2002
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This book has interested me fo

This book has interested me for a long time. Not having ever seen an actual copy, I'd like to know what other things relate to the design, sailing, and death of the Titanic. I know that both basic outlines are the same:

A huge ship labeled as Unsinkable known as the Titan sails from England to New York only to result in great loss of life, due to a short number of life-boats after hitting an ice-berg.

But is there more to it than that? Is there another strange coincidental relationship between the two 'unsinkable' ships? Also, do they have any copies out today? Hope y'all can help!

- Smith sammith77@msn.com
 
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Alicia Windsor

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Hi Smith,

Here's what I


Hi Smith,

Here's what I found in the Titanic Conspiracy by Dan van der Vat and Robin Gardiner. The Wreck of the Titan was written by Morgan Robertson in 1898. Both ships were British, both sailed in April, both had a top speed of 24 knots, both had three propellers, and both hit the iceberg on the starboard side. Titanic had a displacement of 60 250 tons, Titan had a displacement of 70 000 tons. Titanic was 882 feet, Titan was 800. Titanic had 15 bulkheads, Titan had 15. Titanic had 2200 people aboard, Titan had 2000. Titanic had lifeboat space for 1178, Titan had space for 500.
About the book's availability- I don't believe it's being sold separately right now. But The Complete Titanic, by Stephen J. Spignesi, has the full text of The Wreck of the Titan included. Hope this helps.
 
Dec 8, 2000
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Smith and Alicia,

Rather th


Smith and Alicia,

Rather than lock the duplicate thread, I've moved your posts into the existing discussion - and I thought you'd be interested in it too.
happy.gif


Apart from Alicia's suggestion of Spignesi's book there are cheap paperback editions of Robertson's book available. Also, as Mark posted above, the complete text is available online at http//www.msu.edu/~daggy/cop/effluvia/twott.htm. This is the amended 1912 version of the text, slightly changed to bring Titan's specifications and circumstances more into line with Titanic than was the case in the 1898 version.

The full text of Robertson's novella is reproduced in Martin Gardner's Wreck of the Titanic Foretold?. Gardener, a skeptic, examines Titan's story (1912 and 1898) against the Titanic disaster. For an opinion on this book, you could do a lot worse than see Michael Tennaro's review: http://www.titanicbooksite.com/author%20pages/gardnermartin.html. George Behe's Titanic Psychic Forewarnings of a Tragedy also examines Futility and has conclusions similar to those of Gardner. A few years ago, Parks Stephenson wrote up an excellent point by point examination of the novella against the facts of the disaster, but a quick skim hasn't found it yet.

Another thread you might find interesting is in the archive: Morgan Robertson was dirt poor.

Cheers,
Fiona
 

Cara Ginter

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Aug 7, 2005
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Honestly, I read this book, an

Honestly, I read this book, and unless I read a messed up version, I can see nearly no similarities to the ship in the book and of Titanic.
Unless I misread the text (which was all together possible!), the main character lived on an iceberg or ice shelf for a while, with a child, and was attacked by a polar bear. Seems to me that it varies just a tiny bit from the story of the Titanic.
Just my opinion,
Cara
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Honestly, I read thi

>>Honestly, I read this book, and unless I read a messed up version, <<

I don't think you read a messed up anything and I don't think you misread the text. A lot has been made of how precient "Futility" was, but even in the edited post-Titanic version, it doesn't have much resemblance to the real disaster beyond the collision with the iceberg and the loss of the vessel.
 

Paul Rogers

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Nov 30, 2000
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"..it doesn't have

"..it doesn't have much resemblance to the real disaster beyond the collision with the iceberg and the loss of the vessel."

Mike is spot on in relation to the disaster itself. However there were similarities between the two ships; as well as the name, of course. Alicia Windsor noted these similarities above, on 25th March 2003. These - and the similar name - were what got people talking.
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Poor Mr.Robertson, not that he

Poor Mr.Robertson, not that he sounds particularly nice, but that's not the point. He lived and wrote 120+ years ago, and had no idea his potboiler would be so vindicated by subsequent history. He, at least, had some foresight, but I don't think we can criticise him for either his failure to get it 100% right, or for his (to us, lamentable)prejudices.

Philosophically, I reckon this thread belongs in Spooky.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>He, at least, had so

>>He, at least, had some foresight, but I don't think we can criticise him for either his failure to get it 100% right, or for his (to us, lamentable)prejudices.<<

I agree. The criticism, in my opinion, goes to those who read far more into the story then was actually there.
 
Nov 26, 2005
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Sorry if this has been asked a

Sorry if this has been asked already, but was Mr. Robertson even alive to see the actual Titanic's sinking? If so, did he have anything to say on the subject afterward?
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>>He lived and wrote 1

>>He lived and wrote 120+ years ago, and had no idea his potboiler would be so vindicated by subsequent history.

I'm not sure where the "120+ years" figure comes from. Robertson's dates are 1861-1915 and he wrote the first version of "Futility" in 1898.

Robertson sailed on the Great Lakes and was aware of the trends toward bigness - in shipbuilding and everything else. He wasn't the only one to have thoughts on this. There was a very vocal "anti-bigness" faction that compared bigness-for-its-own-sake to elephantiasis! And what's the virtue in that, they asked. Robertson concocted a ship at the outsized extreme of any trend he could reasonably imagine and then wrecked it on an iceberg. But there was plenty of literature where icebergs figured disastrously into tales of sea voyages.

Death by iceberg was on many people's minds when they set out to cross the Atlantic. Today, planes sometimes crash and space flights sometimes go horribly wrong and people embark on those with full knowledge that they might not be coming back. If Robertson were alive today, he might be writing "Airport"-style books, or something like Apollo 13. Or even something on the Discovery Channel's Extreme Engineering proposals. The fact that, sooner or later, one of these projects is bound to fail spectacularly doesn't require much prescience, or pre-vision.

Even a little research into the mythological Titans will show how Robertson got his ship's name so right and how the White Star Line got it so wrong. The WSL can only be said to have chosen the proper name for Titanic in view of what ultimately happened to it, although that was never in their plans.

I put Robertson down as a product of his time who just happened to get lucky with one or two of his books. Nothing supernatural is involved, really.

Roy