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German Liners North German Lloyd

Discussion in 'North German Lloyd - Norddeutscher Lloyd (NDL)' started by Steve Anderson, Dec 17, 2002.

  1. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    You are welcome. Unfortunately, the only good quality photos I have found of the Bremen upon which your grandmother travelled cannot be published here, being that they are copyrighted prints.
     
  2. As for the basic history of the Bremen, another liner that receives to little notice.

    As she took the Blue Riband from the "Mauretania"

    Norddeutscher Lloyd, Bremen in December of 1926 decided to place orders with two German Shipyards for the construction of two express liners of over 46,000 tons each. These liners were to be used on the Bremen to New York Service. Combined with the "Columbus" which had been commissioned in 1924, the two new liners were to operate a regular weekly express service. Norddeutscher Lloyd, specified that the two new liners were to be equipped with engines powerful enough to cover the crossing from Bremerhaven to New York in under six days. It was also decided at this time to incorporate the ports of Southampton and Cherbourg into the express services and from these ports the duration of the voyage should be around five days.

    Deustcher Shiff- und Maschinenbua A.G. Works: Akt.-Ges "Weser" in Bremen were contracted with the building of the "express" liner "Bremen". On June 28, 1927 this yard then laid the keel of the "Bremen." In the presence of President Von Hindenburg who acted as the ships sponsor the "Bremen" was launched on August 16, 1928.

    In mid June, 1929 the fitting out and equipping of the "Bremen" was completed. On June 24, 1929 the "Bremen" left the yard of Deustcher Shiff- und Maschinenbua A.G. Works: Akt.-Ges "Weser" for Bremerhaven, the trip down the Weser was a great and triumphant occasion. On June 27, 1929 the "Bremen" left Bremerhaven for her trials in the North Sea. Her trial and trial trips were of great satisfaction to Norddeutscher Lloyd the maximum speed attained on trials was 28.8 knots with an average speed of 27.4 knots.

    On July 5, 1929 off Cape Lindesnaes the new express liner "Bremen" was officially turned over to Director Glaessel of Norddeutscher Lloyd and the flags were soon changes and she was placed under the command of Captian Leopld Siegenbein, at this point the crew that would be under his command was to number over 1000.

    On July 16, 1929 the "Bremen" left on her Maiden Voyage to New York. With a large crowd watching and over 500 members on the press on board the pleasure steamer "Roland" she left her home port of Bremerhaven. The "Roland" escorted her to the Rotesand lighthose.

    During the voyage from Cherbourg to New York the "Bremen" maintained an average speed of 27.83 knots and completed the crossing in 4 days 17 hours and 42 minutes thus winning the coveted "Blue Riband" She took the "Blue Riband" from the Cunard Lines Mauretania who at that time held the record with a crossing of 5 Days 3 Hours and 14 minutes.

    Her arrival in New york was the event of the decade. She was meet by hundreds of large and small steamers and pleasure craft all schrieking their sirens and whistles, along with the sounding of hundreds of factory whistles and the cheers of thousands of spectators and passengers. She was met at quarantine station by a New York Reception committee headed by a representative for the Mayor of New York, who officially welcomed the Commander of the Liners and the numerous chief officials of the line that were on board.

    President Von Hindenburg sent the following telegram "I wish to convey to the Norddeutscher Lloyd my heartiest congratulations on the occasion of the great success achieved by their new "Express" liner "Bremen". In our hard fight to regain equality of rights in International economics and ocean-traffic, what you have achieved in creating this ship is a great stride forwards."

    On June 22, 1929 in the Ambrose-Channel near the lightship the "Bremen" has catapult launched an airplane with the aid of the Heinkel Catapult-Starting plant to deliver the mail to the Lloyd piers in Brooklyn prior to the final docking. This process of "Air Mail" delivery was met with great interest and on July 23rd the Mayor of New York christened this airplane with the name "City of New York"

    The "Bremen" stayed in New York for five days and during this time was open for inspection to the public. And over 70,000 people visited the ship during this time.

    On July 29, 1929 the "Bremen" left New York with a full complement of passengers for her return voyage. The return voyage ended at 9:12 P.m. on July 31, 1929 and another record was taken for the eastbound crossing which took 4 days 14 hours and 30 minutes at an average speed of 27.91 knots.

    In 1933 the "Bremen" underwent major improvements to her engines to eliminate vibrations in the after part of the ship. At this point the "Bremen" took back the "Blue Riband" that was taken from her by the "Europa" in 1930 for the Westward crossing at an average speed of 28.51 In August, 1933 the "Blue Riband" was lost again to the Italian Lines "Rex"

    In 1937 the "Bremen" underwent another major refit that upped her tonage to 51,731.

    On August 28, 1939 the "Bremen" entered New York for the last time. Given the political situation in Germany and the pending outbreak of War the "Bremen" was instructed to pick up supplies and return to Germany as quickly as possible WITHOUT PASSENGERS. These efforts were stopped by the United States Government who held the liner in port for two days.

    On August 30, 1939 the "Bremen" left New York for the Last time bound for Bremerhaven. After the outbreak of war on September 1, 1939 she altered her course to Murmansk, were she arrived on September 6, 1939.

    The "Bremen" remained in limbo in Marmansk until December 10, 1939 when she left this port bound for Bremerhaven, were she arrived on December 13, 1939.

    In 1940 the "Bremen" was to become a naval troop transport / accommodation ship. She and her sister ship the "Europa" were to be fitted out for the planned German invasion of England, and both the "Bremen" and "Europa" sailed to Hamburg. When Hitler abandoned his plans for the invasion of England, the "Bremen" sailed back to Bremerhaven for use as a Troop Transport / accommodation ship.

    On March 16, 1941 a cabin boy who was disgruntel over a boxing on the ears started a fire in one of the ships storerooms. The fire spread quickly and gutted the ship, resulting in a total loss.

    The wreck of the "Bremen" was then scrapped at Bremerhaven for the German war effort.

    Bremen
    Builders: Deustcher Shiff- und Maschinenbua A.G. Works: Akt.-Ges "Weser" Bremen
    Yard Number: 872
    Gross Tonnage: 51,656
    Dimensions: 938' x 102'
    Engines: Geared Turbines Quadruple Screws with a max. of 135,000 SHP generating 28.5 Knots
    Passengers
    800 First Class
    500 Second Class
    300 Tourist Class
    990 Crew
     
  3. Now a few images of the "Bremen" from my collection

    The "Bremen" in construction on the stocks

    Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd, 1929

    S. Anderson Collection, 2003
    60863.jpg
     
  4. The "Bremen" awaiting Launch

    Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd, 1929
    S. Anderson Collection, 2003
    60866.jpg
     
  5. The "Bremen" just after Launch, being moved to the fitting out basin

    Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd, 1929
    S. Anderson Collection, 2003
    60869.jpg
     
  6. And lastly the "Bremen" leaving for her trials in the North Sea

    Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd, 1929
    S. Anderson Collection, 2003
    60872.jpg
     
  7. Hi Steven!

    Don`t Worry bt your German and your translation is terrible :)

    Wrong: Deustcher Shiff- und Maschinenbua A.G. Works: Akt.-Ges "Weser" Bremen

    Right: Deutsche Schiff und Maschinenbau AG "Weser" - short DESCHIMAG or AG WESER

    Wrong: Captian Leopld Siegenbein

    Right: Captain Leopold Ziegenbein

    Wrong: Rotesand lighthose

    Right: Roter Sand Lighthouse

    And one think as suplement:

    You wrote: The wreck of the "Bremen" was then scrapped at Bremerhaven for the German war effort.

    Suplement: Pices of the Bremen are still on an sandbank in the river Weser. They can be seen by extremly low water.

    very best regards from good old germany

    Thorsten www.LostLiners.de (The Story of the Liners) www.OceanLiners.de (we sell double Ship - Memorabilia!!)
     
  8. fred pelka

    fred pelka Guest

    Steven these photos are exquisite!

    Any idea whatever happened to the cabin boy who torched the original Bremen? What was his name?

    Thanks again,

    Fred Pelka
     
  9. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    A few souveniers of Commodore Ziegenbein:

    The scrap copy of a laudatory telegram sent to him from on board the Bremen by a party of well-to-do Bostonians, one of whom I believe is former Mayor Curley. 60875.jpg
     
  10. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    One of his invitations, to passenger Alice Dana
    60879.jpg
     
  11. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    And his photo, from a newsclipping Mrs Dana put into her album a few years later. The text of the article, which she also saved, gives a lengthy recap of his career.
    60882.jpg
     
  12. Thorsten:

    As for my german the last class I took in it was over twenty two years ago, and needless to say I can't speak a word of it anymore :>)

    Most of the translation errors you pointed out come originally from the data I pulled from various original Norddeutscher Lloyd brochures and newspaper accounts printed in english in New York originally in 1929.

    The spelling / translation for the builder is copied from a 1929 "Bremen" construction and tour guide printed in New York in 1929.

    This guide also lists the Captain as "L. Ziegenbein" in four places.

    As for the lighthouse they have it as Rotesand also in three places.

    Thanks for the corrections but in these cases a quick review of the original Norddeutscher Lloyd brochures in english have the same translation problems so the original copy-writer or reporter made the mistake back in 1929 and it has just been repeated over and over. :>)
     
  13. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    Fred: About that cabin boy- I have wondered about the veracity of that story, since a similar tale was told about the fire which destroyed either the Resolute or the Reliance a few years before the Bremen fire. Here is a menu cover from Mrs Dana's trip aboard the Resolute.

    And Steven- thanks for the Bremen history!
    60885.jpg
     
  14. Jim & Fred:

    As for the cabin Boy. I have alway wondered about that also as every thing that refers to this issue simply states it was a Cabin Boy.

    As for the all the various "Bremen's" I have a book someplace in the collection that was written in the mid-sixties by in German and English by Nordduetscher Lloyd that gives the complete histories of the five Nordduester Lloyd Liners names "Bremen" up to that time
     
  15. A couple of more photographic Postcard images of the "Bremen"

    "Bremen" at Sea
    Publisher:Norddeutscher Lloyd Verlag; F. Morisse, Bremerhaven
    Steven B. Anderson Collection, 2003
    60895.jpg
     
  16. The "Bremen" at sea please note the Catipult can be seen in this image between the two funnels.

    Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd
    Steven B. Anderson Collection, 2003
    60898.jpg
     
  17. Fred:

    I had to dig through the collection to find these postcard images for you.

    The Pasteur / Bremen of which you were looking for an image of.

    I don't have time to look up the history and post it tonight so I will just post a couple of postcard images of her.

    Bremen 32,235 BRT
    Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd
    Steven B. Anderson Collection, 2003
    60901.jpg
     
  18. And to give you an idea of the interiors on the Bremen your Grandmother sailed on.

    Postcard of Bremen interiors
    Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd
    Steven B. Anderson Collection, 2003
    60904.jpg
     
  19. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    Here is a series of images from 2 brochures, showing what the 1939 interiors of the Pasteur/Bremen looked like, from the only brochure I have found showing that liner, and some matching shots of the same rooms from a 1960 Bremen Cruise To The Indies booklet. The Pasteur remained in French military service through the mid '50s, and I am hoping at some point to find photos of what the interiors looked like before NDL removed what remained- I've not found anyone who can tell me if the original 1939 fixtures were removed before she was converted to a troopship or if as in the case of the Queen Mary they were left in place and built around.

    First: The 1939 Dining Room- a Normandie l'Atlantique composite. 60912.jpg
     
  20. Jim Kalafus

    Jim Kalafus Member

    Here is a series of images from 2 brochures, showing what the 1939 interiors of the Pasteur/Bremen looked like, from the only brochure I have found showing that liner, and some matching shots of the same rooms from a 1960 Bremen Cruise To The Indies booklet. The Pasteur remained in French military service through the mid '50s, and I am hoping at some point to find photos of what the interiors looked like before NDL removed what remained- I've not found anyone who can tell me if the original 1939 fixtures were removed before she was converted to a troopship or if as in the case of the Queen Mary they were left in place and built around.

    First: The 1939 Dining Room- a Normandie l'Atlantique composite.