German Liners North German Lloyd


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And his photo, from a newsclipping Mrs Dana put into her album a few years later. The text of the article, which she also saved, gives a lengthy recap of his career.
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Thorsten:

As for my german the last class I took in it was over twenty two years ago, and needless to say I can't speak a word of it anymore :>)

Most of the translation errors you pointed out come originally from the data I pulled from various original Norddeutscher Lloyd brochures and newspaper accounts printed in english in New York originally in 1929.

The spelling / translation for the builder is copied from a 1929 "Bremen" construction and tour guide printed in New York in 1929.

This guide also lists the Captain as "L. Ziegenbein" in four places.

As for the lighthouse they have it as Rotesand also in three places.

Thanks for the corrections but in these cases a quick review of the original Norddeutscher Lloyd brochures in english have the same translation problems so the original copy-writer or reporter made the mistake back in 1929 and it has just been repeated over and over. :>)
 
Fred: About that cabin boy- I have wondered about the veracity of that story, since a similar tale was told about the fire which destroyed either the Resolute or the Reliance a few years before the Bremen fire. Here is a menu cover from Mrs Dana's trip aboard the Resolute.

And Steven- thanks for the Bremen history!
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Jim & Fred:

As for the cabin Boy. I have alway wondered about that also as every thing that refers to this issue simply states it was a Cabin Boy.

As for the all the various "Bremen's" I have a book someplace in the collection that was written in the mid-sixties by in German and English by Nordduetscher Lloyd that gives the complete histories of the five Nordduester Lloyd Liners names "Bremen" up to that time
 
A couple of more photographic Postcard images of the "Bremen"

"Bremen" at Sea
Publisher:Norddeutscher Lloyd Verlag; F. Morisse, Bremerhaven
Steven B. Anderson Collection, 2003
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The "Bremen" at sea please note the Catipult can be seen in this image between the two funnels.

Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd
Steven B. Anderson Collection, 2003
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Fred:

I had to dig through the collection to find these postcard images for you.

The Pasteur / Bremen of which you were looking for an image of.

I don't have time to look up the history and post it tonight so I will just post a couple of postcard images of her.

Bremen 32,235 BRT
Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd
Steven B. Anderson Collection, 2003
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And to give you an idea of the interiors on the Bremen your Grandmother sailed on.

Postcard of Bremen interiors
Publisher: Norddeutscher Lloyd
Steven B. Anderson Collection, 2003
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Here is a series of images from 2 brochures, showing what the 1939 interiors of the Pasteur/Bremen looked like, from the only brochure I have found showing that liner, and some matching shots of the same rooms from a 1960 Bremen Cruise To The Indies booklet. The Pasteur remained in French military service through the mid '50s, and I am hoping at some point to find photos of what the interiors looked like before NDL removed what remained- I've not found anyone who can tell me if the original 1939 fixtures were removed before she was converted to a troopship or if as in the case of the Queen Mary they were left in place and built around.

First: The 1939 Dining Room- a Normandie l'Atlantique composite.
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Here is a series of images from 2 brochures, showing what the 1939 interiors of the Pasteur/Bremen looked like, from the only brochure I have found showing that liner, and some matching shots of the same rooms from a 1960 Bremen Cruise To The Indies booklet. The Pasteur remained in French military service through the mid '50s, and I am hoping at some point to find photos of what the interiors looked like before NDL removed what remained- I've not found anyone who can tell me if the original 1939 fixtures were removed before she was converted to a troopship or if as in the case of the Queen Mary they were left in place and built around.

First: The 1939 Dining Room- a Normandie l'Atlantique composite.
 
F

fred pelka

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Jim and Steven,

Thank you so much for posting these. I remember the exterior of the ship far more than the interiors, though I do also remember running along the decks until the "all ashore who's going ashore" announcement was made. This would have been sometime in 1963.

What a blast from the past! Again, thank you both so much.

Fred P.
 
Here is a bit of information of which I was unaware- although the Pasteur never made a Maiden Voyage (it was scheduled for late September 1939) I have learned, from the latest Richard Faber catalogue, that she did make ONE passenger carrying voyage, which was a cross channel "shakedown" cruise 8/23- 8/25 1939, crossing from LeHavre to Plymouth and Hastings and then returning via Cherbourg. My next goal is to find some photos of said trip.
 
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