Ghosts of the Titanic


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Mar 20, 2000
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All,

I went into the inaccuracies re: the Duff Gordons in Pellegrino's text in some detail. My opinion is that these mistakes are due to sloppy research, not some impending deadline. At any rate, a publisher is supposed to check facts and sources. In Pellegrino's case, it looks like his editors threw the book on the press without so much as looking at it. He could have written it in hyroglyphics for all they knew, the way that travesty was sent to press.

Had Pellegrino cared at all about his work, he could have gotten his facts straight on a lot of those points in a fairly reasonable amount of time without having to worry about passing up any deadline.

In the romance genre, the formula of writing only sample chapters before soliciting is quite correct. However an historical subject requires a great deal of research and precision reporting and really a manuscript, particularly for a novice writer, had best be complete.

When one is dealing with actual persons in actual situations and dates of actual events, I think one would be well-advised to make doubly certain one's work is as accurate as possible before submitting even a snippet for publication. Every researcher and writer makes mistakes occasionally, everyone has a source once in a while that may not be sound, etc., but when a book is chock-full of inaccuracies like Pellegrino's is, it really boggles the mind as to why he should be regarded as an authority.

I personally feel he is the least informed and therefore least qualified researcher to write on Titanic. His book "Ghosts of the Titanic" is the shoddiest bundle of words on the market that I've ever read on any subject recently. I hope it will be his last book on Titanic.

Randy
 
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Oct 13, 2000
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no such luck, Randy. Pellegrino promises (threatens?) a third book to come, printed in time for the 100 anniversary of the disaster. now that he has made such a pot of money on his first two books, maybe he can afford a competent editor? naaaaaaaah.

Michael (TheManInBlack) T
p.s. Tracy you are repeating yourself.
p.s. Tracy you are repeating yourself.
 

Tracy Smith

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The computer hiccuped
proud.gif
 
Mar 20, 2000
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Tracy,

Its better to have a hicupping computer instead of some old rag like I've got. I sometimes get booted offline twice in an hour!

Michael,

O, no!!! Play a dirge with that news, will ya!?! The up-side to it, I guess, is that maybe Pellegrino will have read a book or two about Titanic by the time he starts writing his next one!

Randy
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Well, if Pelligrino publishes, I suppose I'll buy it if only for the sake of having a slightly more complete collection...and perhaps something to critique.

However, I draw the line at any of Gardiner's work. Even my stomach is not that strong!

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Dec 7, 2000
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All,

In my personal opinion, I'd rather buy the Gardiner books than Pellegrino's. I know G's switch theory was a bit bogus, but some of his other stuff seemed ok, whilst Pellegrino's book is chockers full of bogus theories and “facts”. He seems to even make up accounts just to support the stuff that falls into his head.

I loved Randy's post. Tracy agreed with it 2 times ... I'd agree 3 times but ...

We all probably know of Candee's account on his web site. I say it's all fake, and if not, there's a great deal of fabrication. I still say there is NO possible way she could have EVER found her way to the very front of the ship and did a Jack and Rose ... only by herself.

Daniel.
 
Apr 27, 2003
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I'm currently reading Ghosts Of The Titanic. I'm really enjoying the book but I've noticed from some other threads that a lot of people don't agree with the authors theories. I would like some more opinions on the book and why or why not you agree with most of it.
Thanks
Tammy
 
C

Catherine S. Ehlers

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Pellegrino in his book "Ghosts of the Titanic" states that Thomas Andrews, on hearing comments from several passengers that their portholes had been left open, went around the ship kicking doors down in order to close portholes before the water reached them. Nowhere else have I read about Andrews doing this. Did this happen? Or is this something Pellegrino made up?

Also, in the same book, he quotes one of the barbers as saying that shortly after the collision, Andrews went below and opened one of the gates into steerage, allowing third class passengers a way up. Never have seen this anywhere else, either. Is this yet another Pellegrino fabrication?

Since Pellegrino seems to have a reputation for putting words in people's mouths and thoughts in people's minds, I wondered what basis, if any, these accounts had.

(Not to mention Helen Churchill Candee at the bow and fireman George Kemish wondering what happened to the stowaways.)

Thanks for any clarification.

Cathy
 
Jan 7, 2002
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artistic licence perhaps?

I also read somthing in that book about contraceptives being sold in the barber shop....


regards

Tarn Stephanos
 

Jeremy Lee

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Tarn, are you sure?

I don't remember reading this, its seems to me a little far-fetched. Which page is it on? I will go and check it out.
 

Cam Houseman

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Thanks Randy, for your point by point refutation of his errors regarding the Duff Gordons.

He does no better with Captain Lord, many times resorting to character assassination and hearsay. Though I will not go through a thorough point by point analysis at this time, I will show one thing that jumped right off the page at me because it was so ridiculous.

On pages 223-224, he makes the preposterous insinuation that Lord purposely ignored "people" who had somehow made their way to an ice floe about a mile from the wreckage site and hauled themselves upon it. The author implies that Lord dismissed these "people" as being seals, simply because he couldn't be bothered to save them.

Pellegrino does not explain how someone could possibly swim that far in freezing water and then still have the agility to haul themselves onto a slippery ice floe, let alone be up and moving around after that many hours of exposure. Nor does he seem to have any problem that Captain Rostron seemingly passed by these same "people" as well.....

Perhaps at another time, when I have the time to read the book again, I will go through more points as you have brilliantly done in regard to the Duff Gordons.
is this the book where he switches between the sinking and the wreck expedition?
 

Cam Houseman

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I rate "Ghosts of the Titanic" as just about the best book I have read on the Titanic disaster. I guess it is easy to be very enthusiastic about a new book but I liked the descriptive style of writing and also what was to me a lot of new and surprising information. I'm satisfied that Dr Pellegrino has laid to rest the never ending debate on the identity of the "mystery ship"! This writer is convinced it was the California, no if's, but's or maybe's.
Another tidbit from the book I found interesting was the discovery of Major Peuchens wallet in the Titanic's debris field. According to "Ghosts of the Titanic" the Major threw his wallet overboard. As we know he was later ordered into boat 6 to assist as a crew member. As boat 6 left the Titanic at 12.55am Dr Pellegrino concludes that the Titanic didn't drift in any current. That's the way I interpreted it anyhow.
I recommend this book to anyone. It is a very interesting read indeed.
I just ordered “Ghosts of the Titanic” from amazon, paperback, for only $24.95! I can’t wait to read it! Too bad it gets here between January 8th-21st..
 
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