Glad it sank


Kevin Tischer

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Dec 24, 2011
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Do you think there was anyone happy the ship sank? Maybe they were not looking forward to NYC or they hated there spouse and wanted them dead anyways. It's not that far fetched to think out of 2200 people and 700 survivors there was one person that might have been glad it went straight to the bottom.
 

Matthew Farr

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Mar 23, 2000
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Lansing, Michigan, United States
John Jacob Astors' ex wife
happy.gif
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Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Even the most cold hearted, jealous adversary of the Titanic (whoever that might have been) could surely not have felt any delight in the sinking once the death toll was announced.

If the ship had sunk with no loss of life it might be more plausible.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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According to Joseph Conrad somebody took malicious pleasure in the sinking. I've never seen the actual papers he's thinking of. Maybe they mentioned the pride that goes before a fall.

"...the "King's Enemies" of a more or less overt sort are not altogether sorry that this fatal mishap should strike the prestige of the greatest Merchant Service of the world. I believe that not a thousand miles from these shores certain public prints have betrayed in gothic letters their satisfaction--to speak plainly--by rather ill-natured comments."
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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When Titanic sank, the emnity between the Kaiser's Germany the UK, France and possibly Russia was building. Germany was building her navy. Anything which embarassed her adversaries would privately have been viewed with glee. The Titanic, while not a Royal Navy ship, was officered by many RNR men. The British 'pride of the ocean' going down on it's maiden voyage must have given the Kaiserlich Marine a great deal of satisfaction.

New book due out in April!!

JC
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Though I'm sure he would have denied any schadenfreude, I think the Bishop of Winchester was not altogether horrified, as he took the opportunity to thunder from the pulpit about sin, hedonism, retribution, man's hubris, wrath of God etc. etc. etc.
 
Dec 29, 2006
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Witney
>>> The "King's Enemies" of a more or less overt sort are not altogether sorry that this fatal mishap should strike the prestige of the greatest Merchant Service of the world. I believe that not a thousand miles from these shores certain public prints have betrayed in gothic letters their satisfaction--to speak plainly--by rather ill-natured comments. <<<

This could be a reference to certain extreme elements within the Irish Home Rule movement, some of whom would probably have regarded Harland & Wolff and its largely Protestant work force has a symbol of Irish Unionism. The year 1912 was, moreover, a time of high tension in which the United Kingdom came close to civil war over Ireland.
 
May 31, 2006
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Certainly in 1912 one would be hard pressed to find any significant sentiment in favor of the sinking. However, a century later, an entire industry has evolved with a real stake in the continuation of interest in the disaster. Authors, film makers, writers and researchers of all stripes and abilities depend on the fact that the Titanic sank. The disaster has enabled many of them to reap significant financial rewards and, as a cynic, I tend to believe that many cash their checks without too much of a feeling of remorse that the ship went down. A few years ago I went to the New York City Titanic exhibit.Most of the displays were of 100 year old cups, saucers, plates and utensils- all very pedestrian- with knock offs available in the souvenier shop at ridiculous prices. The lines were long at the checkout register.
 

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