Goodwin's Cabin


Ben Lemmon

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Oct 9, 2009
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Does anyone know the Goodwins' cabin number? I was wondering if there is any record of it. More specifically, what deck were they on? Is there any possibility that they were on E deck? If not, that is OK. I have an idea for a story, but I want to check my facts first. You know, weigh all my options. If anyone can get back to me on this subject, that would be much appreciated.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Not known, Ben, but it wouldn't have been a single cabin. The older males were likely to have been quartered up forward and Mrs Goodwin and the girls and baby certainly in the stern section. One of the cabins allocated to the Sage family was 126 (4 berths) in Section M on E deck. That would be a suitable area if you need to invent a cabin location for a Goodwin child.
 

Ben Lemmon

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There were eight people total in the family, right? Is it possible that they could have used a 6 berth cabin, like E-154? Would that have contained their whole family or would it have still not been enough? I could probably find a small 2 berth cabin to use, but I would like to know if you think that would be enough? Before you ask, yes, it is a 3rd class cabin.
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Bob Godfrey

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That would be cabin 154 in Q Section on E deck (only the 1st and 2nd Class cabins were referenced with the deck letter preceding the number). Not really big enough to provide for 6 'adults' requiring individual berths plus one child and an infant. Besides which it was generally the policy to minimise the number of 'adult' males travelling in the stern section with the single women. A father with his family, yes, but not his strapping teenage sons as well. So it's more likely that Mr Goodwin and his two older sons shared a cabin in the bow and Mrs Goodwin with her baby, youngest son and two daughters were in a 4-berth cabin at the stern.
 

Ben Lemmon

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That would be cabin 154 in Q Section on E deck (only the 1st and 2nd Class cabins were referenced with the deck letter preceding the number).

Hey, thanks for that little tidbit of information Bob. I had no idea. Cameron made another mistake, didn't he? Would Jack have called his cabin G-## (whatever number it was)? Or would he have not used the G?

About the Goodwins, what you said would work out well with the story!! I'm assuming you know which one
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. I've only bugged people with mentioning it since I arrived two months ago. Anyway, it would work well because it gives the MC an incentive to be in the bow at the time of the sinking.

By the way, weren't the Goodwins spotted on deck as the last lifeboats were leaving?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Offhand, I can't think of any survivor's account which mentions the Goodwins at all. There were accounts of the Sage family reaching the boat deck - maybe you were thinking of that? As for Jack Dawson, he was a fictional character so he could say or do anything he liked! :)
 
Jun 24, 2015
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Not all of the Goodwin could stay in section m on e-deck.since the males were placed at the bow of e-deck.so that means the male goodwins stayed in section b on e-deck
 
Nov 13, 2014
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Only the unmarried men were put in the bow section of the ship, and the unmarried women were at the stern, between the families. A very prudish decision, but it makes it easier for us to investigate who was in which cabin.

So I do think the Goodwins were all together in 2 or 3 cabins at the stern section of the ship.
 

Jim Currie

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Hello Christophe. You write:

"Only the unmarried men were put in the bow section of the ship, and the unmarried women were at the stern, between the families. A very prudish decision,"

When you write prudish, I presume you mean by present-day standards?(of which there are very few):rolleyes:

In reality; can you imagine the problems of policing there would have been on board a ship had young bucks and females been allowed to mix freely? Compare that to the sometimes disruptive effect on ordered society this new-found freedom has created nowadays.

At least cows and bulls are contained within fences and the species flourishes. Most other, free-ranging species are slowly becoming extinct:rolleyes:

Jim C
 

Bob Godfrey

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Christophe, the policy of the time meant that 'adult' sons, which meant some as young as 12, were berthed in the bow section. In such cases a protective father often chose to travel with his boys in the bow, leaving the rest of his family (wife, daughters, youngest sons) in the stern.
 

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