Goodwins seen on deck

mary mason

Member
Aug 24, 2003
126
0
86
i think i can remember reading somewhere that the goodwin family were seen on deck when the boats were being loaded, can anyone verify this or have i got them mixed up with another family?
thanks
 

Ben Holme

Member
Feb 11, 2001
714
2
148
Hi Mary,

Personally speaking, I have never come across any survivor account in which the Goodwins were observed on the boat deck during the lowering of the boats. My suspicion is that the family you refer to were the Sages of Peterborough, who apparently did make it to the boat deck as young William's body was later recovered. One account, of questionable veracity if I recall, has Stella Sage actually entering a boat before stepping out again when the rest of her family were barred from joining her.

The Goodwins are a different story. I don't believe their movements were recoreded at all during Titanic's final moments and my theory is that they never made it to the boat deck.

Best Regards,
Ben
 
Mar 26, 2001
103
0
146
Another possibility of the family seen on the deck are the Anderson/Danbom families. According to the bio for Anna Nysten, who was accompanying the families, she reported seeing them on deck before she made her escape.

Per the Goodwins, I too remember reading only that there no recorded accounts of their actions during the sinking.
 
L

Laura Melinda Varjo

Guest
Hi Mary, I think you have read that information in the Mammouth Book of the Titanic, it was Bertha Mulvihill's account. She remembered seeing a mother clinging to her 6 children and husband, and would not enter a lifeboat, because her husband Charles Frederick could not go, and the result was that all 8 of them perished. At least Augusta could of placed the 6 children in the boat, Lillian was old enough to look after them, plus Frederick had a brother already living in New York.

Christa, I've read in some of the earlier threads (and in Women & Children First)that the Goodwin children-William and Harold met up with 6 other youngsters and had a marvellous time hanging from baggage cranes, and exploring the ship.

Hope this helps, Laura
happy.gif
 

Carol Goroff

Member
Jan 2, 2005
10
0
71
Frederick Joseph Goodwin was my grandmother's brother. In some manifest listings, he was listed as Charles Frederick or Frederick Godwin; however, those listings are erroneous.

As I mentioned on another message board a 1st class survivor invited my grandmother and greataunt to come to New York. She told them that she saw the Goodwin family as she was entering the lifeboat, "The mother would not leave her husband and the children would not leave their mother."

However, I have seen no other documentation supporting this. (I think I have identified the widow surviving, again no documentation.)

Where could I find Bertha Mulvihill's account?

Carol Goodwin Goroff
 
L

Laura Melinda Varjo

Guest
Hi Carol, you can find her account in the Mammoth Book of Titanic by Geoff Tibballs, or if you go to her biography on this website.

Laura
 

Tad G. Fitch

Member
Dec 31, 2005
579
1
86
Hi Carol! How are you doing? As Lauro mentioned earlier, Bertha Mulvihill did indeed mention seeing a mother and her children on the deck as the ship sank. The family was from steerage, but was the Rice family, not the Goodwins.

The newspaper article which I believe is the one in question, was published in The Providence Journal, April 20, 1912. This article misquotes Bertha Mulvihill as saying (off the top of my head, sometimes a dangerous proposition!) that she saw Mrs. Rice and her husband and children and that Mrs. Rice stayed behind because her husband was held back by an officer. Bertha Mulvihill did indeed say that she saw the Rice family on the deck before she left the ship and mentioned this in press accounts, to family and friends, but the part about the husband is almost certainly an invention of the press (as is the part of the article which among other things, inaccurately quotes her as saying that she saw Captain Smith brandishing a revolver, and that she heard 'Nearer My God To Thee' as the ship sank, statements that she denied making to her family).

Mrs. Rice’s husband had been killed in an accident well before the Titanic’s maiden voyage and was never aboard the ship. Bertha would have been well aware of this and was able to identify them, as she was acquaintances with Margaret Rice, who was also originally from Athlone, Ireland. Margaret, in a letter written to friends in Washington prior to the maiden voyage, mentions that she was going to be traveling to America with Eugene Daly and Bertha Mulvihill. The Rice family (Margaret and her five sons Albert, Arthur, Eric, Eugene, and George) was traveling to Spokane, Washington. All of them perished.

I hope that this answers your questions. More information about Bertha Mulvihill and the Rice family is given in an article that I wrote about Bertha which was just published in the Titanic Commutator. I would be more than happy to get you a copy of the 1912 Mulvihill press account in question somehow if you can't find it elsewhere. Hope this letter finds you well.
Kindest regards,
Tad Fitch
 

Samuel Liu

Member
Dec 10, 2005
23
1
71
i felt bad for the Goodwin's. not one member of that large family was able to survive. they were trapped inside the third class cabins because of the gates that were locked.

Always thank God, and be Faithful to Him.
 

Samuel Liu

Member
Dec 10, 2005
23
1
71
hey carol,
when i heard that Fredrick J. Goodwin was your grandmother's bro, i was surprised. is he your grandpa?
 
Dec 6, 2000
1,480
3
166
Samuel,

Just as your mother's brother is your uncle not your father, Carol's grandmother's brother was Carol's great-uncle, not Carol's grandfather.
 

Carol Goroff

Member
Jan 2, 2005
10
0
71
Lester,

Thank you for helping to keep the Goodwin record accurate. Yes, Fredrick was my great-uncle and Augusta was my great-aunt. They were first cousins, so my grandmother knew her as they all were growing up.
Carol
 

Carol Goroff

Member
Jan 2, 2005
10
0
71
Hello Samuel,

Welcome aboard this message site. Why were you so surprised? I have been hoping to find other relatives descendants of the Goodwin/Tyler couple who are still living with memories. No response yet.
Carol
 

Brian Ahern

Member
Dec 19, 2002
643
1
146
Hi Carol,
It's nice to have you on the board.

Just to clarify - do you mean Frederick and Augusta were first cousins to each other? I had never heard that before.

Regards...
 

Carol Goroff

Member
Jan 2, 2005
10
0
71
Hi Brian

Yes. As you can see from the marriage certificate posted, my grandmother Florence Emmeline Mary Goodwin was one of the witnesses at their wedding.

Regards, Carol

PS My question: Have you heard anything I have not heard? I would like to complete an accurate picture. Thanks for your interest.
 

Brian Ahern

Member
Dec 19, 2002
643
1
146
Carol - I'm sure you have come across Walter Lord's The Night Lives On. That is the only book or source I can think of that deals with the Goodwins in-depth.

It was because of this book that the Goodwins were among the earliest passengers I learned about, and so there story has always had a special poignancy for me. I would love to help one of their relatives learn more about them, but I'm afraid I've never read anything else on them.

The only source I could suggest would be the local contemporary papers of Niagara Falls and Fulham. American newspapers often did pieces on immigrants who were en route to their areas when there were already relatives there for them to interview. Maybe a reporter knocked on Frederick's brother's door? My guess would be local historical societies and librarians would tend to be receptive to someone in your unique situation.

The other Mr. Goodwin must have been very excited to have his brother and sister-in-law coming. What a sickening blow it must have been for your family.
 
Dec 6, 2000
1,480
3
166
Evening Carol,

It has been awhile. Hope you have been keeping well. Saw you had not been signed into E-T for sometime, so replied on your behalf.

With all good wishes to you and yours for Christmas and for 2006.
Regards,
Lester
 
Apr 27, 2003
419
0
86
Carol - Greetings - I have just added the below to the Goodwins biographies - I hope you find something of interest?

Cheers Brian
Goodwin, Mr. Charles Frederick. (40). Missing. Watson's Court, High Street, Melksham, Wiltshire.
Ticket number CA2144 cost £46 18s 0d.
There is a memorial to the whole family at St. Michaels Church Melksham, Wiltshire.
Property lost valued at $250. $150 Red Cross awarded to sister and her husband to cover money loaned by them. Mother granted 5s per week by the English fund.
London address: 10 Vernon Street, Fulham.
Goodwin, Mrs. Augusta. (43). Missing. "
Probate report: Goodwin Augusta, of Watsons Court, Melksham, Wiltshire. Administration, London 19th September 1912 to Clara Ann Berry, wife of Ernest Albert Berry. Effects £26.11.0d.
(From The Emergency and Relief booklet by the American Red Cross, 1913).
No. 159. (English). A family of husband, 42 years old, wife 44 and six children ranging in age from 18 months to 16 years, were lost. Goods valued at $250 were lost with them. His widowed sister living in this country had sent $50, and his brother-in-law, also living here, had sent $100, to help pay the passage. They were unable to stand the loss of this money. The man's mother, 72 years old, lives in England, with her were two sons, one 37 years old, a cripple unable to work, and the other a carpenter's assistant, 35 years old. The son who was lost had helped support his mother. Investigation established the accuracy of the facts given. This Committee refunded the $150 borrowed from sister and brother-in-law, and referred the case of the mother to the English Committee, which granted a pension of 5 shillings a week. ($150).
Goodwin, Miss Lillian A. Missing. (16).
(From The Bridgwater Mercury, 20th April, 1912).
West Country People In The Titanic
Melksham
Among the passengers was a Melksham family of eight persons - Mr. and Mrs. F. Goodwin, Watson's Court, High Street, Melksham, and their six children, whose ages range from 17 months to 16 years.
Goodwin, Mr. Charles E. (14 years old). Worked for Henry White and Son. Missing. Address as above
Goodwin, Master William F. (11 years old). (Child). Missing.
Goodwin, Miss Jessie A. M. (10 years old). (Child). Missing.
Goodwin, Master Harold V. (9 years old). (Child). Missing.
Goodwin, Master Sidney L. (6 years old). (Child). Missing.
(From The Night Lives On, Walter Lord, page 94-96)
Frederick Goodwin was no ordinary emigrant. He was a 40-year-old electrical engineer who lived with his wife, Augusta, and their six children in a small but neat house in Fulham. As the family grew, Mr. Goodwin began looking around for new opportunities. His brother, Thomas had already left the old country and settled in Niagara Falls, New York; so when Thomas wrote of an opening at the big power station there, Frederick jumped at the chance.
He got rid of the house in Fulham, paused briefly at Melksham, and booked passage for himself and family on one of the more modest steamers operating out of Southampton. But because of the coal strike they were transferred to the Titanic.
(From The Bath Journal, Saturday, April 20, 1912).
MELKSHAM
Frederick Goodwin and his wife and six children were on board. They had been living in Melksham for some years. Goodwin was a machine hand at the foundry, and about 40 years of age. The eldest of the children, a girl, was 16 or 17 years of age, and the youngest was a baby of a few months. The Goodwins have relatives in the States, some of whom had recently been on a visit to Melksham, and returned not long ago. Presumably they induced Goodwin to leave the old country; he was going to a situation near the Falls, already found for him, and his relatives had provided a house and furniture for the family. The supplementary list of survivors issued yesterday contained no Goodwins, so that the whole family would seem to have perished.
---
Mrs. Goodwin's sister did not learn of the family's death until a week after the disaster. In an interview with the Daily Mirror she told how she was on her way to attend a service for the victims the following Sunday when she met Mr. Goodwin's mother. The elder lady, not knowing that Mrs. Berry didn't know the family had sailed on the Titanic, handed her a telegram saying the whole family was lost. Mrs. Berry stated that Mr. Goodwin was a compositor by trade and had been married eighteen years.