Grand staircase clock


M

Marcia Plain

Guest
I am doing a research paper on the titanic interior design and the information I found states it was powered by a single AA battery.
I hope this helps!
 
M

Marcia Plain

Guest
That is what a web site I found said. Sorry for the incorrect info. then.
 
M

Marcia Plain

Guest
I am not sure. I don't remember that information being in what I had found. I have to do a research paper on the interior design of the Titanic through web sites. I am having some trouble finding some of the information.
 

Bill Sauder

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Dec 19, 2000
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There were three types of clocks used on Titanic.

First were the ship's two chronometers, which were highly accurate hand-wound clocks kept in the chart room. These kept Greenwich time so that officers onboard could determine the longitude of the ship.

The second set (about a dozen in number I recall) were hand-wound wall clocks in the radio room, bridge, etc., which also kept Greenwich time for log keeping purposes.

The third set consisted of a master clock in the chart room and 48 slave clocks in passenger and crew areas around the Titanic, including the grand stair case mentioned here. These secondary clocks were all controlled by the master clock to permit the time changes to be made as efficiently and inconspicuously as possible as the Titanic crossed time zones.

By the way, the Baker's shop also had a spring-wound clock. Would anybody care to guess why the bakers needed to know what time it was in London?

Bill Sauder
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Bill,

No idea about the bakers' clock, but I also read (can't remember where though) that the two clocks in the Lounge were not connected to the master clock. The source specifically mentioned 48 clocks being connected to the master clock, except for the two in the 1st class Lounge. Any confirmation on that or any idea why that was so?

Daniel.
 

Bill Sauder

Member
Dec 19, 2000
230
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Dan:

You are probably thinking of the Olympic Auction Catalogue of 1935 which states:

[Lot] 4087: The installation of “Magneta”￾ electric impulse clocks, comprising: the clockwork master clock, in this room, and forty dials, but excluding two of French ormolu in Lounge

The Magneta clocks were auctioned off as a system -- a master and most of the secondary clocks went as a unit since one wasn't good without the other.

There is an interesting exception though: Certain clocks, such as that in the Reading Writing Room, which had artistic cabinets and could "stand alone," i.e., they were not built into the cabinetry somehow, were sold separately from the Magneta system. This was probably done so that the new owner could put a conventional movement in the case.

I strongly suspect that the Lounge clock was in fact a Magneta clock sold with the paneling, rather than scaring the woodwork with an empty spot where the clock used to be. If it were not a Magneta clock, it would not be specifically mentioned in connection with the sale of the Magneta master.

As for the reference to the "two of French ormolu in Lounge", I think it's probably a mistake. I suspect that the auction compilers didn't notice that one case housed a clock, and the other an aneroid barometer.


Bill Sauder
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Bill,

Thanks for your reply. Come to think of it, I do believe it was the auction catalogue where I saw the mention, as I did reference it recently. I knew that one of the fittings in the Lounge was a clock and the other a barometer, and thought it odd that the auction catalogue did not pay attention to it.

What about the sitting room clocks? Each of the 4 rooms had one, and they *look* like they could "stand alone".

Regards,

Daniel.
 

Bill Sauder

Member
Dec 19, 2000
230
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Daniel:

The Suite clocks crossed my mind as I wrote the reply, but off the top of my head I don't know what became of them. If only 40 of the 48 secondary clocks were auctioned with the master, but the suite clocks don't seem to appear in the auction catalogue, it is possible that the suite clocks were kept or given as momentos to important personages.

Recall that the staircase cherubs don't appear in the catalogue. Trophies, I think.

As a footnote, the Drawing Room cartel clock from the Aquitania was an authentic antique which had its original movement replaced with a pulse secondary clock.

Bill Sauder
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Bill,

The 40 clocks being sold with the master certainly explains why the staircase paneling lots from the various levels specifically mentioned that the clock was not included. Yes the cherubs were missing, all of them must have been given away or run off with before the auctioneers had a chance to catalogue. There must have been a fair few items "looted" from the ship before it was handed over to the auctioneers. I see there is no mention of the "mystery box" on B deck anywhere either.

Going back to clocks, for anyone interested, here's pic of the Lounge fittings. The clock is on the left, and barometer on the right:

56928.jpg


Regards,

Daniel.
 
May 20, 2002
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Maybe the Bakers needed a manually set clock in order to time things in the oven. The resetting of the slaved clocks, would throw the bakers off on the number of minutes remaining in preparing baked goods while in the oven.

I am not sure if timers existed back then.
 

Bill Sauder

Member
Dec 19, 2000
230
2
146
Stephen:

Exactly. The time back in London didn't make a difference, it was the fact that the clock was never changed to adjust for time zones so that the proofing and baking times were not disturbed.

The Titanic was a period of transition and the time on the electric "Passenger" system was adjusted only once a day, however, in the 1890's it was a common practice to make up for lost of gained time several times a day.

Bill Sauder