Gravesite or Salvage


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Mike Herbold

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Dec 13, 1999
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If my things, or a relatives, had gone down with the Titanic, I'd love to see them brought back up. I know there are those who consider it a gravesite. I consider it more like an archeological dig, and welcome the salvage efforts AS LONG AS THEY RESPECT THE HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE SHIP AND ARE NOT JUST OUT TO SELL MORE PIECES OF COAL. So far, it seems like the salvage operations have been very respectful.
 
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Robert M. Richman (Titaniacbob)

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I agree. Due to the deteriorating condtions on the ocean floor I heard that in as little as 30 years all could be lost forever. How do you folks feel this would affect the memory of the poor souls that were lost as well as the history of the tragic event?
 
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Tracey McIntire

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I think that the story of Titanic will continue to fascinate people regardless of whether the wreck is intact or not. The story was just as popular before the wreck was discovered. Granted, the wreck has increased interest, but I don't think the Titanic saga depends on it to survive.
 
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Giselle15

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I was just wondering if the Titanic would have hit the ice berge straight on, would it have done less damage? Would it have even sunk?
 
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Mark Bray

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I am not sure if it still would have sunk, but I think maybe the damage may have not have been as bad, b'c the iceberg Titanic hit kind of like scraped on the side leaving a huge gap for water to go in, but I am no expert.

Mark
 

Mike Herbold

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An article by Dave and Barbara Shuttle in the just mailed "Voyage" from Titanic International shows the good effects of the salvage operations. When Howard Irwin's journal was recovered from the bottom of the sea, the gravesite of his world travel companion Harry Sutehall was not desecrated -- he and Irwin were figuratively brought back to life.
 
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Mary Jane Hurd

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I either saw a show on discovery or read an article about the bodies, I think it said something about leather pouches, that actually were the passengers stomachs. Has anyone heard of this and do they know how to find out about it?
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I would have to say "no way" on the leather pouches being stomachs, the soft tissues of the digestive system are among the first and fastest to decompose after death. There are lether articals at the wrecksite and the reason they survived is because of the way they were processed and treated. The little beasties at the bottom which eat organic tissue find tanned leather very unpalatable.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Dec 31, 2000
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As to hitting the burg head-on...from what I recall Bob Ballard saying was...
If she had hit the burg head-on, Titanic possibly could have stayed afloat. Everyone in the foward compartments would have been killed on impact..
ie: crew quarters
But, it would have saved many more lives.

Am I correct on this? Does anyone else recall Bob Ballard saying this?
 
Oct 28, 2000
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Naval architect Wilding, one of the men who designed Titanic, made such a statement to the British hearings. He was undoubtedly right.

-- David G. Brown
 
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I don't recall Dr. Ballard making this statement, but if he did, he wasn't the first. As David said, Wilding beat everybody to the punch in 1912.

I think I heard it mentioned several times on some of the Discovery Channal documentaries, but I won't have time to check until next weekend.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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