Gravestones in halifax


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emma skinner

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i dont really know where to put this, but does anyone know the source of the stone that was used for the victims gravestones?
 
Aug 29, 2000
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Emma, according to Blair Beed's excellent book, TITANIC VICTIMS IN HALIFAX GRAVEYARDS, the White Star Line paid for one size of stone. If the families wanted a bigger stone, or inscription, they had to pay for it. Fairview Lawn Cemetery is the only one of the three cemeteries that has some larger stones, and also the only one where more than the name, date of death and assigned body number appear. I am no stone expert but they seem to be of granite, and I imagine, from driving the coastline, there must be local granite quarries. One interesting fact from the book, White Star had asked E.W. Christie to design the Titanic plot, and the curve of the line of the 4th row and the top of the fourth row of stones suggests the effect of the bow of a ship. Between the top of the first row and the top of the fourth row, there is a gap left suggesting the gash which was supposed to have been made in Titanic's side. Hard to say whether or not this was deliberate.
 
Aug 29, 2000
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Emma- just reading Alan Ruffman's book.TITANIC REMEMBERED- it says White Star gave Frederick Bishop of Halifax Marble Works the contract for the gravestones and other stone and concrete work around the plots. Bishop put in the concrete coping along the heads of the stones as a base for the later placement of markers. I think they are called "footings" here in the US. The coping was put 3 to 4 feet below ground level with about 6 inches showing above and 14 inches across. By mid-October 1912 the polished bevel-topped black granite stones arrived. They came in lots as the quarry could not provide that many all at once. Baron De Hirsch was installed first and are thought to have been set by November 6th. White Star paid for the caskets from Ontario, all expenses relating to burials and the upkeep, until 1930, of the cemeteries when it created a fund with the Royal Trust Co. of Canada for perpetual care. In 1944 Halifax City assumed responsibility for Fairview, and in the 1980's the transfer of the trust fund divided resources among the 3 cemeteries. In 1998 improvements were made to all three which included resetting stones and adding pathway signs.
 

Roger Hinton

Member
May 9, 2006
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I am trying to track down the source of the Titanic victims' gravestones in the City Cemeteries of Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Some information has suggested that the stone may be from a quarry local to Halifax but the age of rock is apparently not compatible.
The stones are similar to the Gabbros of Aberdeenshire, Scotland and possibly those of Ireland but no historical record has come to light indicate their origin.
Anyone know who made the gravestones or where the stone was from?

[Moderator's Note: This message, originally posted as a separate subtopic, has been moved to this pre-existing thread addressing the same matter. MAB]
 
Mar 23, 2003
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In October 2001, I took a guided tour through the Fairview Cemetery. It was quite impressive. The gravestones are laid out in the form of the ship with the point (bow) facing the sinking. On the right side (starboard) there is a break in the line, representing the fatal blow.

We also toured the Maritime Museum. I enjoyed observing the items recovered from the surface; however, it did not have the overall affect on me that the graveyard tour did. IMO, there is something about the people that ties you to the tragedy.
 
Mar 23, 2003
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I forgot to read the previous postings...the information about the gave layout had been previously provided.

If anyone stops in Halifax; take time to tour the graveyard. You will not regret it.
 

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