Jan 5, 2001
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I was 'informed' last week that smoking was much more widespread in 1912. True.

But I also heard that first class passengers could grow weed on the Titanic; I couldn't stop laughing. Untrue!(?) Oh dear. I can imagine lots of plant pots hidden in the en-suites, or the engine room!
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Best regards,

Mark.
 
May 8, 2001
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Potted plants on the Titanic have just taken on a whole new meaning! Where did this conversation uh .... crop ...up?
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Brian Hawley

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I wonder when pot was made illiegal in the UK. The Marijuana Tax Act of 1937 federally prohibited marijuana in the US.


Brian
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi Jason, Colleen, Brian!

It is funny. I heard the idea from a friend at college, who was likely half-joking but does come up with some interesting ideas.

When it was made illegal in the UK, I don't know.

Best regards,

Mark.
 
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Chris Gregory

Guest
maybe that`s how the satupid joke about J.J. and the ice came about if someone was stoned
 
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Stephen Stanger

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"HIGH! Welcome to Titanic, she weighs in at over six and a half millon STONE. Some of her rivets were HAMMERED in by hand, our steam PIPES are strong and our expansion JOINTS are sturdy and as a TOKEN of our appreciation.......
ah bow-lochs......I'll stop.
 
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Bob Godfrey

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Let's get something straight here. Pot was NEVER served in First Class (not even in the potted shrimp). In Third Class, however, the thursday teatime menu offers 'dry hash'. I'm up for that.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Leona,

The weed was made illegal for non-medicinal use in the UK in 1928, but I believe it was still available from pharmacies on prescription (in tablet form) until well into the '60s. Certainly it would have been fairly respectable if available on the Titanic - Queen Victoria was not long departed and she had favoured it for relieving period pains.

'Recreational' use in Britain didn't take off until the 1950s, when Caribbean immigrants brought ganja to these shores and it became popular with white jazz musicians. First police bust was in 1952 at the Number 11 Club in Soho. And no, I wasn't there!

Bob
 

Lee Gilliland

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Feb 14, 2003
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I must say, the idea of a stoned Queen Victoria boggles the imagination. Could you let me know where you learned that?
 
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Bob Godfrey

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Hallo, Lee. There was nothing scandalous or even unusual in the medicinal use of 'Indian hemp' in the Victorian period. The Queen's personal physician, Sir Russell Reynolds, frequently prescribed it for menstrual cramps and wrote in 'The Lancet' that the drug "when pure and administered carefully, is one of the of the most valuable medicines we possess". A claim that many today would support, though I have no personal opinion to express!

Another Victorian favourite was laudanum, a solution of opium in alcohol. One brand, sold as 'Godfrey's Cordial' (no relation) was advertised as an ideal remedy for whatever ails you, and was frequently used to reduce noisy infants to a state of peaceful torpor.
 
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Jake Angus

Guest
Well, well....... a spliff w/yer afternoon tea, and a concert by the ship's orchestra! I could think of less pleasant ways to pass a couple of hours!

Upon reflection, these people DID eat enormous quantities of food, right! Maybe ganja and hash were smoked in the First Class Reception room before gliding in to dinner?????????????
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Oct 12, 2004
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Even in the early parts of the 20th century, the United States and "all interested nations" were trying to stamp out the use of all narcotics. A conference in Shanghai in 1906 saw the first steps in the prohibition. Followed by the Hague conference of 1911, leading to the total illegalization in 1912 in what was called the Hague Convention of 1912 (I know its the same name as the year before). Though the implementation of these laws werent really enforced until 1914, I think it shows that pot plants on the Titanic would be a stretch on a ship travelling internationally.

Drew
 

Paul Lee

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Aug 11, 2003
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You never know. Wait for it to appear in another Pellegrino or Gardiner blockbuster! I can see it now - the real reason the ship hit the berg:
Murdoch had had too much Waccy Baccy and was seeing double. He couldn't decide which was the real iceberg and which one wasn't!

Cheers

Paul

 
Jun 18, 2007
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Pass the dutchie on the left hand side...and don't Bogart it. :p

"Murdoch had had too much Waccy Baccy and was seeing double"

How do we know it wasn't Hichens? Something's got to be said for the one doin' the steering much as anyone else, dude.

What might have worked...setting up the berg with an extra large blunt, some Cheech and Chong movies...and Bergie would have been one little contented floating (in more ways than one) piece of ice, and would have drifted along and out of the way of the ship. Happy ending all around.
 
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robert s hauser

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Why is everyone so down on Pelligrino? Cameron, and Ballard seem to have thought he had some sort of usefull knowledge. Gardiner was a good writer, he just used a cheap tactic to sell a book. So what? People do it all the time. If you can make he can make money doing that, then he's a lot smarter than a working stiff like me. Just curious. -Rob
 
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Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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If you go into the books folder, Robert, you'll find quite a few threads in which people explain at length what they find problematic about Gardiner and Pellegrino.

Essentially, much of it boils down to historical methodology and approach to the subject...e.g. the interpolation of fictional material into a supposedly non-fictional text. I suggest you go to the books folder, and in Gardiner's case to the technical folders as well, for further explanation of why many people feel as they do about these writers.
 

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