Harland and Wolff approved 18 feet long Titanic Model. Simply Amazing.


TitanicNerd

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Jan 18, 2014
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So, I was browsing the internet for accurate Titanic models and I come upon a model approved by Harland and Wolff, that is over 18 feet long! Here, have some info about it:
The Model



- The hull is a fiberglass form plated and riveted with brass plating, per the original plans, using more than 3,376,000 rivets, composed of three (3) different styles.
- Every bulkhead is in its proper location
- The entire superstructure is constructed of brass.
- The model weighs 1,500 pounds
- The decking is real wood, as is the deck furniture, which is crafted to exact proportions.
- All exterior windowed rooms are to scale, including the furniture and décor inside each room
- The telegraph in the Bridge is internally lit
- Its lighting is so complex that it required the installation of more than 8 miles of fiber optic cable.

Wood Case
- The wood case took two (2) craftsman two (2) years to build
- The case was hand-carved, based on the original turn-of-the-century design used by Harland & Wolff for all builder’s model cases
- Each side holds a single piece of glass, so as to not obstruct the viewing of the model
- The glass was made in England, the only place that could make glass this size
- Each (long) side of glass weighs 1,000 pounds

Oh, did I mention that this model took SEVEN YEARS TO BUILD. Also, Harland and Wolff gave these fine people real pictures and blueprints of Titanic, and they approved the model as 100 percent accurate! Get ready for the price, this model is...........

$2,500,000.00!

Here, have some links:

If you somehow have enough money to buy the model, here is where you buy it! 1:48 Scale Shipbuilders Model of RMS Titanic

If you just want to bask in it's glory and dream of having this model, here you go: RMS Titanic
 

TitanicNerd

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Jan 18, 2014
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Awesome! Imagine trying to fit THAT in your lounge room!

Cheers,
Adam.
Lol, I know! I was begging my friend for money I was like "PLEASE I JUST NEED MONEY FOR A AWESOME TITANIC MODEL THAT IS 18 FEET LONG" and he was like "Where are you going to put that, lad?" and then I realized my dream will never come true.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Aw, I dunno - you could always paint the roof of your house blue and strap it on that, or something. ;-)

Cheers,
Adam.
 

James Garrett

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Sep 24, 2011
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This is the Fine Art Models 1/48 Titanic.
Fine Art Models is currently based in Birmingham, Michigan a few miles from where I used to live. About 12 years ago my father and I arranged a tour of their facility. I was able to get a very close look at this very impressive model before it was displayed at various museums. I was amazed at the fine detail and craftsmanship that went into this model. I still remember looking in at the miniature Cafe Parisien and the few other interior rooms that where included. The owner of the company mentioned that they only modeled interior rooms for which they have complete documentation. I think this resulted in only a few interior rooms being included in the model.

Fine Art Models also had quite a few other ship models include a smaller 1:192 scale Titanic that was for sale for $12,500 or $15,000 with scale replica H&W style display case.

There is another discussion of this model in an older thread.
https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.o...foot-titanic-model-display-washington-dc.html
A few of the more experienced members of this ET noticed some errors but otherwise remarked on the fine quality of the workmanship.

I would guess that Fine Art Models is not doing as well as they where 12 years ago since they moved out of the light industrial building they used to be in, are operating out of a smaller building or house, and many of the models are no longer being sold.
 

Adam Went

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Thanks for sharing that, James - it's a shame that they don't seem to be doing so well these days, I feared (as i'm sure many of us did) that there would be a downturn in interest in the Titanic once everything surrounding the centenary had passed.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

James Garrett

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TitanicNerd, if you click on the link I provided about the older thread you can read what was said about the mistakes. Something was mentioned about the wrong type of collapsable lifeboats and incorrect funnel vents. It was said that the owner rejected advice from a number of Titanic experts when the model was built. When my father and I met Gary Kohs, the owner of Fine Art Models, Mr. Kohs boasted of the in-depth research they did; he mentioned his people tracking down in St. Petersburg, Russia, the only known copy of a catalog from a supplier to H&W (perhaps they got the wrong catalog!). He did appear very opinionated about a number of things and at one point made a comment about how disgusted he was with outgoing president Bill Clinton and how George W. Bush was going to bring honor and dignity back to the White House. I guess he assumed that anyone with the money to buy his company's models would most likely lean Republican; I was turned off by the unprompted political comment.

When I looked at the model, I did not see any mistakes mainly because I am not a rivet counter. I was also overwhelmed by the beauty and craftsmanship of the model.

By the way I was actually seriously considering purchasing the smaller 1:192 scale model but after a few days of pondering the idea, I realized that at my income level it would be daft to spend that much on a model. It would have exceeded the price I paid for my 2nd automobile that I purchased new at the time!
 

James Garrett

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Sep 24, 2011
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Metro Detroit, Michigan
Thanks for sharing that, James - it's a shame that they don't seem to be doing so well these days, I feared (as i'm sure many of us did) that there would be a downturn in interest in the Titanic once everything surrounding the centenary had passed.

Cheers,
Adam.

Adam:
Your welcome.

I think that is only a small part of it. The "Great Recession" may be a bigger factor. Fine Arts Models made models of about 100 different subjects (about 30 of them ships), Titanic being just one of them. Of course the big 1:48 Titanic was much more ambitious that the rest. I do not know if the majority of their sales were regional or not but Michigan and other midwestern states got kicked hard by that recession. If I recall correctly most of the models where in the $6,000 to $15,000 range with a few over $33,000 (again not counting the big Titanic). They are definitely a luxury most cannot afford.
 

Adam Went

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Hi James,

Yes, I know what you mean. I only live in a regional area but there used to be several modelling stores in the area, and now because of the economic difficulties that you've described they've been forced to close down. Sign of the times but still a great shame.

I must finish my "Build the Titanic" model one of these days. It's only a metre long but I only got about a third of the way through it because I got sick of the hull panelling splitting on me. One day....

Cheers,
Adam.
 

James Garrett

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Sep 24, 2011
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Metro Detroit, Michigan
I must finish my "Build the Titanic" model one of these days. It's only a metre long but I only got about a third of the way through it because I got sick of the hull panelling splitting on me. One day....

Cheers,
Adam.
That is too bad you are having problems with that model. Its as if your Titanic wants to sink ;)
I got lucky. I had been working on the 1:350 scale Academy Titanic model several years ago and was stuck on whether to discard the plastic railings and get the photo-etched brass details instead when my father gave me a nice pre-assembled Titanic model that was roughly the same scale and complete with metal railings and other details in appreciation for my visiting him on a regular basis. While this model is nice it does not quite match the Fine Art Models 1:192 Titanic. While the FAM Titanic may have a few inaccuracies, in all probability the model I have does so as well.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hi James,

Ha, ha! That's like the iPhone joke, call your iPhone "The Titanic" so it says "The Titanic is syncing..." ;-/

The model your father gave you sounds fantastic, metal railings would be much nicer (and more durable I would have thought) than plastic railings as well.

Here's the website for the same model that i've got - as you can see from the photos, the hull panelling is thin and awkward. It gets held in place with these tiny little tacks while the wood glue dries but it constantly seems to want to bend and buckle out of shape, and I think I ran out of hull panels in the end!

Build the Titanic

Cheers,
Adam.
 

James Garrett

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Sep 24, 2011
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Metro Detroit, Michigan
Adam:
Thanks for the link.
There was have been a time when I would have had the patience to build a model like that but that time had passed.'
If you are able to complete the model, it looks like it will be quite detailed; it has many brass detail parts. The larger scale, 1:250 vs the 1:350 of my smaller model, also provides a more realistic look.

One curious thing I noticed in looking at some of the weekly part sets, is that it looks like the collapsable lifeboats (see Week 63, in the 1st and 2nd photos there are one or two among the more numerous standard lifeboats) appear to have the same shape as the much criticized collapsable boats on the large 1:48 scale Fine Arts Model. In both cases the boats have mostly parallel sides with stubby rounded ends. Yet in a well known photograph taken from aboard the SS Carpathia of one of the Titanic's collapsable boats as it approached rescue, the collapsable boat appear much more curved in its shape. Where did this other design for the collapsable boats come from?
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hi James,

That's a very good question about the collapsible boats, and i'm afraid I can't provide an answer. I have all 100 issues of that particular weekly model set, but I probably only got to about 35 / 100 with it. One day i'll fish out the remaining issues and examine it in a bit closer detail for you.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

James Garrett

Member
Sep 24, 2011
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Metro Detroit, Michigan
Adam:
My curiosity about the Engelhardt collapsible lifeboat mystery prompted me to do a cursory bit of research about them. Why would the Fine Arts Models people put the wrong type on their Titanic model (and the Build the Titanic kit also appear to make the same mistake)??
My (perhaps hasty) conclusion is that there were at least two or three types of collapsible boats:
1. The original version from around 1903 with a flat bottom and canvas sides. Capacity of 33.
2. A version made by McLean-Chambers with mostly straight sides circa 1906-1907, a stubby bow and stern, and a slightly curved bottom with a capacity of 49. It appears that this version was supplied to the RMS Lusitania.
3. An improved Engelhardt version with a capacity of 47 (according to Titanic - The Ship Magnificent).

It is possible that the type of collapsible boat used on the Lusitania was also used on some other ships. Did FAM simply find information about the earlier type instead of the type used on the Titanic?

An article on the Titanic Research & Modeling Association shows the original and the type used on RMS Titanic.
The Engelhardt Collapsible

A discussion about the Lusitania's collapsible boats include a picture of a straight sided boat with relatively stubby bow and stern.
TITANIC FORUM - Lusitania experts: can you identify this collapsible

There are two pictures in the following article about RMS Lusitania that appear to show the stubby 2nd version which somehow got used for the FAM Titanic and other kits.
Lest We Forget Part 2 : As The Lusitania Went Down by Jim Kalafus & Michael Poirier - Gare Maritime
(there are two pictures that show a stubby looking collapsible boat stored underneath a standard lifeboat on davits.)

Of course there could be yet another make or model of a collapsible from that time period as well but for now my guess is that the type used on the Lusitania was incorrectly used for the FAM Titanic.

-Jim
 

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