Harland & Wolff Titanic Plans


J

Justin Wyrick

Guest
I know that the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum now has the Titanic plans given to them by Harland & Wolff, but I have a few questions about them. Though maybe some of you might know. Sorry if I am repeating what someone else has already asked!

Do they have all the plans or just some of them?

Do we know how many Titanic plans there are or are still around?

Do we know what the different plans where, like rigging and so on?

Where there and are there still plans of the Arrol Gantry?

Can you still buy prints from Harland & Wolff or do you now have to get them from UFTM?

Has anyone purchased any recently and how much do they usually cost?

Sorry for asking so many questions! I have always been interested in the Titanic and recently been trying to find out more about the plans. This is also my first post on this web site. I have been visiting for a long time, but just finally joined. I just want to say this is a great site with an awesome group of people!
 
Sep 28, 2002
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Justin,

All ship plans from that area were given to the UFTM by H&W.
They should have at least one copy of each plan.
Like other projects many plans are made, i.e. copies etc.
Rigging plans are available.
The Arrol Gantry plans should be at UFTM.
Plans not available at H&W any more.

All the best

Jim Carlisle
 
B

Brian R Peterson

Guest
Hi Justin,

There are a number of sources for Titanic blueprints; it depends on what you are looking for and what you are prepared to spend

You can find an excellent and accurate layout of the Titanic complete with cabin numbers and furniture arrangements on the front and back covers of “Titanic: Triumph & Tragedy”￾ by Eaton & Haas. The only drawback to this is that the plans are small and details are hard if not impossible to see in areas, but it gives a good impression of her layout. The book is fairly hard to find as I believe it is out of print, but it usually retails for around $40.00 - $50.00. Its worth the money, the book has a wealth of information about the ship and its crew and passengers.

You can also find a fairly decent set of plans at the Titanic Historical Society, though there are only the bare basics of deck layouts and how many beds each cabin held, no cabin numbers or furniture layouts. These sell for around $20.00

TRMA (titanicmodel.com) has just released a very handsome set of general arrangement plans of the Titanic that is accurate up to date, new facts are always surfacing, these plans show furniture and equipment layout of every area on the ship along with detailed labels identifying these areas. These plans are rather large and easy to read and retail for around $40.00 I believe.

The most accurate plans IMO, are the Hahn CAD plans, also found on titanicmodel.com. They show every conceivable detail possible and are great to use for reference when building Titanic kits in any scale. However they do not run cheap, I think they retail between $100.00 - $300.00 last I have seen.

As James said earlier, UTFM would also have a wide array of plans and photos of what you are looking for, however there materials do not run cheap either, but are worth the investment once made.

I hope this helps!
smile.gif


Best Regards,

Brian
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Brian,

The "Titanic Triumph and Tragedy" plans are accurate, but not that accurate. They do not show any furniture arrangements at all. They don't even show how many people were intended per each room. However they do give all the cabin numbers (some of them inaccurate) and try identify every room on the ship.

The TRMA plans are the most accurate plans you'll find regarding the interiors, which show furniture and machinery arrangements, all the cabin and room identifications etc.

As for the Hahn CAD plans, these would be the most accurate plans for exteiors, although I myself have found a few inaccuracies in them. Don't get me wrong, the plans might have one or two faults, but they're excellent in every other respect.

Regards,

Daniel.
 
Aug 10, 2002
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Hello all:
I'm looking for Titanic's plans. In particular I want:
inboard profile, plan views of each deck. hydrostatic curves, capacity plans, Trim and stability booklet. Does anyone know where such are available?
Regards,
Charlie Weeks
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Charlie - another good book for Titanic plans is "Wall Chart of the Titanic". Not horribly detailed, and missing some of the details from T&T - but they're BIG!

I can bring it, if you want.
 
Jul 7, 2002
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Hi Everyone,

You can also get a set of deck plans from the National Archives for $10. These plans, used in the liability hearing, are two poster-sized sheets and include a profile and all decks. They are easy to read and indicate cabin and berth numbers but not furniture arrangement.

The 1st class passenger accommodation plans do include furniture arrangement. These are available from THS for $20, but they are also included in Marcus' The Maiden Voyage and The Titanic Collection: Mementoes of the Maiden Voyage (a box set of facsimile documents produced by THS).

Does anyone have the plans by Bruce Beveridge? The THS on-line store says: "Titanic's general arrangements at 1/350 scale show her accommodations, engine & machinery, deck & shell plating, auxiliary apparatus and so much more. References include Harland & Wolff General Arrangements, Limitation of Liability General Arrangement Plans from the National Archives, the latest edition of the first-class passenger plan, The Shipbuilder and several other resources make this combination of data from private collections into an extraordinarily detailed and accurate illustration of the ship all in one place." They sound interesting but I'm not sure I want to spend $40 for them just now.

Best wishes,

Cathy
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Does anyone have the plans by Bruce Beveridge?<<

Cathy, I've ordered a set and I'm hoping I get them in time for the symposium in Maine. If they get here in time, I'll be bringing them along with me. With people like Scott Andrews and Daniel Klistorner as the ones who worked with Bruce on this, we're talking about the Varsity Squad of Titanic techies who put this together. While they may not be 1,000,000% perfect because of unfortunate gaps in the historical record, my bet is that they'll be as close to reality as anyone can ever hope to get with the surviving resources.
 
Jul 7, 2002
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Hi Michael,

I hope they arrive in time for the symposium. If they are as cool as they sound, I'm sure after I get a close look I won't be able to resist buying my own.
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Best wishes,

Cathy
 
Jul 7, 2002
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Dear fellow deck-plan geeks,

I have a question about something on my deck plans from the liability hearing. On E Deck there are two notations that say something something like "BOS Gate" or "305 Gate."

One is in the forward section, near a double staircase in the third class area. There other is aft on E Deck, near the stairs by the restaurant staff quarters and the potato washers. (I can scan and send these bits to anyone who would like to see them.)

Does anyone know what these say?

Best wishes,

Cathy
 
Dec 2, 2000
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I can't speak to the set used in the Limitation of Liabilty hearings, but I got the set I ordered from Bruce Beveridge and Co. in the mail today. Now if only I can figure out a way to get them to the symposium without having to fold them up in my suitcase.
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Hi Cathy,

The "305" you spotted is a broken-up "BOS". "BOS GATE" is an abbreviation for "Bostwick Gate", the trade name for the type retractable metal gates installed at these locations. They're basically the same as what was shown in Cameron's "Titanic" and in "A Night to Remember".

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Here's a bit of useless trivia: the Bostwick gate derives it's name from the inventor, an American by the name of Jabez Abel Bostwick (9/23/1830 - 8/16/1892). Mr. Bostwick was a part-time inventor and full-time business man. He was one of the founders of the Standard Oil Co., and it's first treasurer.

Scott Andrews
 
Jul 7, 2002
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Hi Scott,

Thank you! I've seen the gates depicted in the films you mention, but I had no idea if they really existed. I'm researching this for the Titanic symposium next month, so I really appreciate the info!

Were there other gates, or just these two? Do you know where I could find more info about Bostwick gates on Titanic?

Best wishes,

Cathy
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Hi Cathy,

Despite what's shown in the movies, there are surprisingly few of these gates. The gates you mention seem to be the only ones indicated that actually separate the 3rd class passengers from any other part of the ship. The only other bostwick gates noted on any of the plans are those over the entranceways into the stores lift running between the galleys on D-deck and the galley stores below. Personally, I'm a bit mystified by the fact there is only one set of those gates indicated up forward since there are three sets of stairs going up to the 3rd class open space on D-deck. If the sole intent was to close off access to this space from E-deck, you'd think there would be a set of gates on all three stairways. Maybe Dan Klistorner has found an answer to this.

Now, there are a number of emergency doors from Scotland Road and the 3rd class accommodations aft allowing access to the companionways at the bottom of the 1st and 2nd class stairs. Swinging doors are indicated in these locations rather than gates, though I suppose it's possible that gates were present as well. It was fairly common shipbuilding practice in the days before air conditioning to provide gates as well as doors in the same opening as barriers to keep people on one side or the other while allowing ventilation in hot weather. This would have rarely been a problem while at sea on the North Atlantic, but July and August in New York can be oppressively hot and humid.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Scott,

As far as I can remember, there were only 2 indications for Bostwick gates. One was fore on E deck at that 3rd class staircase, and the other for the hoist aft on E deck. As you said, there were a number of other locations especially at the various decks for the hoist terminals, and the elevators would also have had one. However other than the two mentioned above, none of the others are mentioned on the deck plans. It doesn't mean that they weren't there, they just weren't indicated.

I think that there would have been one on F deck preventing access to G deck from the 2nd to the alternate 2nd/3rd class accommodation, and another one on the port staircase in the 3rd class area prevending access to G deck, depending on which class got G deck for whatever voyage, the according gate would be closed.

Daniel.
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Dan,

Thanks! It makes sense there would have to be some way to redirect the flow of people through these areas when they were being used alternately for one class or the other, whether with a bostwick gate or some sort of portable bulkhead like those White Star used to erect portable 3rd class cabins on some of their ships.

Scott Andrews
 
Jul 7, 2002
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Michael, is a cardboard poster tube allowed as carry-on luggage? (I hope you can figure out some way to bring them with you!)

Daniel and Scott, thank you both for all the good information!

Best wishes,

Cathy
 

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