Harold Bride photos

Mar 3, 1998
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Dave,

Now that you've got me thinking about it, I believe more strongly than before that Marconi was behind the publicity surrounding the "Shut up!" affair. Please bear with me as I theorise a bit here....I haven't firmed up my thoughts on this yet, but I'd like to throw out a few thoughts for the discussion.

Upbraiding an operator with a "QRT" or what Bride described as "D...D...D" (the origin of which I still haven't been able to determine) is normally nothing worthy of comment. It's going to happen when you have multiple stations conducting all their business on a single frequency. However, in this instance, it was a point of interest in two inquiries. Why?

In 1912, Marconi was continuously manoeuvring around his chief rival, Telefunken. DeForest, too, but by 1912, Marconi had DeForest pretty much in hand...Marconi happened to be available to attend the Senate Inquiry into the Titanic disaster because he was already in the States to sign off on the deal that would bring United Wireless into the Marconi fold. An everyday confrontation with a Telefunken ship might just be an opportunity that Marconi thought he could exploit.

Bride had to have mentioned the exchange with the Frankfurt with Marconi when the Director came to visit on board the Carpathia. Maybe Bride mentioned it as he sought to recall every detail of the event, maybe Bride was worried that Frankfurt would report it...I don't know. The fact is that -- from Marconi's view, at least -- the incident had the potential to make the Marconi operators look bad. Well, maybe Marconi felt that the best defense would be a good offense...he would encourage Bride to bring up the incident publically. There was no need to suggest to Bride that he should fabricate the truth or exaggerate in any way...the corporate animosity that Marconi operators felt toward their Telefunken counterparts was enough to naturally colour Bride's version of events. All Bride had to do was tell the story as he saw it. So, instead of the German operator coming out with a story about how Titanic's operator cut him off from providing assistance, the public would have the Marconi side of the story first, which basically painted the Telefunken operator as not quite competent. And it's always the first story that sticks in peoples' minds.

I'm not saying this is what happened...I'm coming up with this scenario as I write. There is no direct proof of any of this, save the fact that Marconi saw Telefunken as his greatest rival and that he was constantly looking for ways to undercut it. I extrapolate from this fact and speculate that Marconi himself was the driving force behind Bride's public mention of the Frankfurt incident. Because, as you say, there's no other good reason for Bride to have brought it up.

I don't know...what do you think?

Parks
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Tim Brandsoy

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Feb 19, 2002
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"By the way, in order to answer the original question posed in this thread, the Bride family owns several unpublished photos of Bride. One of the family members has a biography about Bride in the works, which will be your only chance to see these photos. I was privileged to see at least some of these photos, including a full-figure portrait of Bride in Marconi uniform, with cap on his head. And no, I was not allowed to copy it.

Parks"

Was this book ever published?
 
Jul 23, 2008
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I've always wondered how well Bride and Phillips got on during the voyage. Until the disaster they lived in close proximity, often working long hours under a great deal of pressure. Did a friendship strike up between them? What did Bride say about Phillips in later life, if anything? I'd love to know.
 
Mar 17, 2010
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Hi Anthony,

One Harold Bride's page here on ET there is a quote in which he mentions Jack (there are more, but this is probably the best for their relationship); 'He was a brave man. I learned to love him that night and I suddenly felt a great reverence to see him standing there sticking to his work while everybody else was raging about. I will never live to forget the work of Phillips during the last awful fifteen minutes.'

I think it's from his section of Titanic Voices, but I'm not 100% sure.
 
Mar 17, 2010
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I think there's something to be said about shared experiences to bring people together here

I wonder, if Jack had survived, if he and Harold would have remained/become friends....
 
Mar 26, 2009
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I'm an amatuar human relationship studier, but I feel that they did become friends and Jack dying did effect Harold. However this is just one man's opinion!
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Andrew, the passage quoted by Carla above is actually a small part of the article published in The New York Times on 19 April 1912. It comes to us via a TNYT reporter and should be read accordingly.

From limited evidence, the pair seem to have been at least on good terms. Bride was willing to get up at midnight in order to give Phillips a break after his long efforts of the previous night. They shared enthusiasm for radio and that sort of thing brings men together, even if they have little else in common.