Harold Bride


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matthew Sims

Guest
With many thanks to Allison, for it is with her admiration of this man that spurred me to want to find out more about him, that i owe thanks to, for giving me wonderful readings and learning much about the man. I have found upon study of him, that while his time spent studying the marconi system was short, the man was as quiet as his demeanor. The books i have read indicated that he gave the first detailed accounts of that night to the public, however reluctantly, and that his decision to use the then new American call of SOS rather than CQD, turned out to be a pivotal moment and decision. He spoke glowingly of the work of his partner that night, Phillips, and said at one point "i learned to love the man that night". It was stated that he had spent much of the half hour after the striking of the berg relaying messages to Capt Smith, then finally Smith came to them both and told them they were relieved, that they had done all they could, and at that point it was every man for themselves, because in situation like that, its just the way it is, Smith reportedly told them.
The image i got of the brief reading i did on the man were these: A very capable and professional man while on duty, but very much a shy young boy in other ways. But he always spoke in glowing terms of his commrades, and was a very heartfelt and observant young man. The image i saw that absolutely chilled me was his being helped off Carpathia by 2 men because his feet were so frostbitten. I learned he never spoke of the incident again, not even to family, and became very reclusive. It was stated an author was trying to track him down, but said the only clue he found was that in later years a Harold Bride had checked himself into a New York hospital at age 75 for an undisclosed amount of time. Thats what i have so far, and id like to see what others have to offer
 
Jan 5, 2001
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As far as I recall, he died in the mid-1950s aged 66, although I could easily be wrong on that figure.

Charles Pellegrino's (ROTFLOL) book 'Her name...' has some info. including Walter Lord's account, if my memory's not going.

Best regards,

Mark.
 

Phillip Gowan

Member
Apr 10, 2001
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Matthew,
I sent a transcription of his death certificate to Phil H. and it appears on his biography on this site. Also have one for his wife if you want anything on her.

Regards,
Phil
 
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matthew Sims

Guest
Well i guess what im curious about, and i cannot put an exact quote on it, but at some point while he was delivering messages back and forth to Capt Smith, he said at one point he entered and found a gentleman with his arms wrapped around the stomach of Phillips, and it was at that point he wondered if a 'seamans death' for him was not proper..Can anyone shed light on that incident?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
My understanding is that it was a fireman trying to pinch Phillips lifebelt. Bride pounced on him and they left the bloke there out cold (Or stone cold
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) on the deck.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Allison Lane

Guest
Did you really start looking into Harold Bride because of me? Gosh! You're awfully welcome!
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If I remember correctly, he was 65 or 66 when he died--way too young for it, in my opinion. Phil--you have his wife's death certificate?


-Allison L.
 
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matthew Sims

Guest
Yes Allison it was because of you and the way you spoke of the man. I guess ill only be another fool that will say i echo the rest of the sentiment here when i say that i found your fixation as you called it, to be very heartfelt and real. You see, last week when everything that happened in New York and Washington D.C. happened, i wondered if it was going to be like most big name news stories; Here today, forgotten tommorow (btw whos the happiest man in Washington these days? Gary Condit, because the nation forget about him)....Id like to share a very personal story about how your views influenced me, Miss Lane...(btw, does that mean theres a Superman in your future?
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Back some years ago, there was a horrible horrible tragedy of a 13 year old girl that was shown a fake police badge by a man, and to make a long story short, she was brutally tortured and raped..It was big news in this area for a long time. I remember reading in the paper the day she was to be buried the name of the cemetary, and thought 'that cant be the one i pass everyday'...Well sure enough it was. As i walked home that day, and saw the mass of flowers and wreaths, some bearing inscriptions "dearest beloved grandaughter" and "our baby", i walked up to that hill..I stood there for hours on end..The scene had an impact on me like no other...Now of course, the day has long been forgotten..The cameras are gone, people dont remember. But that day on that hill, i made a solemn promise not to forget. So each year, on her birthday and on the date of her passing, i lay a single rose on her grave. I vow to do this until my last breath on this earth.
And the reason i bring that all up is simple, (and by the way ive never told a single soul that story above), and that is simply when i see that someone who is as bright, articulate, well spoken and such a great hope for future representaion of this country, when you see that this person not only remembers a wireless operator, but speaks with her heart and open affection that she would give a major body part to see the man smile, then yes, that affects me.I got misty eyed reading the comments. And indeed it seems the man lead a lonely life in the years after, being greatly affected by everything that happened that night. It makes you wonder more about just how his relationship with Phillips evolved, and how close they were. It is easy to see upon basic research they were more than co-workers, for indeed it seemed to me like they had a brothership..


Oh well, sorry i bored you all..My point in all this is, seeing how you all here react to everything, it gives me hope that the 5000 will hopefully be remembered in quite the same fashion as 1500 plus are here
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Matthew: That was deep, man, and well said!

The story of Harold Sydney Bride was one of the first that I became familiar with when I decided to become a Titaniac. I have always found a strange connection with him, and there is a reason for it. He wasn't my age (six years older than I am now), he lived nowhere near me, but...he looked like me! I bear an eerie resemblance to the man. I only wish that James Cameron could have saw me! But on the other hand, I would have been way too young for the role back then, and I likely would be now. Not only are we similar in looks, but from what I hear, Mr. Bride was a very shy person most of the time, opening up to very few. I am the EXACT same way! This is two of a handful of reasons that I find him fascinating...even if not to the extent of Jack Thayer or R. Norris Williams.


Cheers,
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-B.W.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Had written to the Marconi Company in Chelmsford in 1977 about Bride- they said he was presented with a gold watch when he left them- he went on to the Mona's Isle as an operator. Got some more stuff to dig out on Bride in the cellar somewhere.Have been nursing a bad cold and had a trip to hospital with kidney stones this week-must have been something to do with turning 50 last Monday!
 
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matthew Sims

Guest
Shelley dont worry about turning 50..I mean im 27, and if its true what they say, that life begins at 40, then i guess i have 13 more boring years ahead lol
Anyway, i guess why what Allison said touched me so much was, he she is a young girl at a young age, looking into a person most forgot about. and thats why i bring up the story of the girl i visit every year. It really does give one hope that people will be remembered. Too many times, after the stories been told, and the cameras go home, we tend to forget. We cant make that mistake with Titanic or any other troubled times
 
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Minna Tiihonen

Guest
Hey Matthew!

How you wrote about the relationship between Bride and Phillips was nice to read. I know two different friendship backrounds for them: the other is that they didn't even know each other before they boarded the Titanic at Belfast, and the other is that they met for the first time in 1911. Bride had just finished his training to become an operator and Phillips was returning to sea after some years in Clifden, Ireland. Like we know, Bride was very shy and first almost shocked to meet Phillips who made friends easily and spoke all the time. It took some weeks before Phillips 'cracked' this 'cover' Bride had. As Bride was just starting his career, the help of Phillips was very much appreciated by him. Bride started to feel comfortable with Phillips who really was never shy. This story suits well the fact that on board the Titanic they really already were good friends. The way how Phillips told Bride to dress warmly, the way how Bride helped Phillips to get his coat and lifebelt on, the way Bride stopped the man stealing Phillips' lifebelt...

Brandon: boy, wouldn't I just love to meet someone who looks like Bride - I think he was quite handsome young man
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Minna
 
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matthew Sims

Guest
Minna, thank you for the ever so kind and undeserving words. In a weird sense, these past 2 weeks i think i kind of got a sense of what it must be like to live a life at sea. You travel so much, that everyone and everything looks the same, and when you meet that person that you really do share a special kinship with, as Bride did Phillips, it changes you..Forever
 
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Minna Tiihonen

Guest
Hey again Matthew
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The past 2 weeks... have you been at sea or...? Myself I almost wish I could someday be there. I just simply love the ocean.

Phillips and Bride were lucky to get to board the same ship. They must have missed their families and relatives sometimes, spending so long times far away, so at least they've been able to make each other feel better.
I can't even imagine how Bride has felt after the loss of his friend. As far as I know he suffered from depression and low self-esteem for months and actually never fully recovered... he never wanted to discuss the Titanic...

Don't thank me. The way you wrote was beautiful.
Minna
 
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Emily Bisignano

Guest
. . . and just imagine personally knowing all 1500 people that went under like they were your best friends. I can especially relate to all the immigrants lost on the Titanic because they were my people. I can relate to a vast majority of them since I have a many nationalities in my family background. I know a lot about the immigration to America during the early 1900's and I can feel the pain of the ones that couldn't make it. . .that one fateful night. . .
 

Charmaine Sia

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Nov 25, 2001
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Matthew,

Thank you very very much for sharing your story with us. It is indeed very touching and heartwarming to know of events like this, and to know that people are remembered years after they die, even when everything else is gone.

<FONT COLOR="aa00aa">And the reason i bring that all up is simple, (and by the way ive never told a single soul that story above), and that is simply when i see that someone who is as bright, articulate, well spoken and such a great hope for future representaion of this country, when you see that this person not only remembers a wireless operator, but speaks with her heart and open affection that she would give a major body part to see the man smile, then yes, that affects me.I got misty eyed reading the comments.

I got misty eyed reading this thread alone. I can understand the longing to see a smile on the face of a man who has been tormented by something as terrible as the sinking of the Titanic. Wireless operator or not, Bride suffered a lot from the incident, and that's enough to make us feel bad about it. I hope that now he rests in peace and that he is with the friend ("brother" in fact) that he lost so long ago.

>He spoke glowingly of the work of his partner that night, Phillips, and said at one point "i learned to love the man that night".

><FONT COLOR="ff0000">Phillips and Bride were lucky to get to board the same ship.

I can't even imagine how Bride has felt after the loss of his friend.

It must have been hard on Bride to lose a friend who had guided him all this while. They had been close together, and helped each other out when the ship was about to sink. As Bride said, "I learned to love the man that night," to lose someone you were so close to and whom you had newly-found a kinship to must have been very painful. Especially the way Bride stopped the man stealing Phillip's lifebelt, of course in the hope that they would both make it out of the ship, and later to find out that while Bride had survived, Phillips had died of hypothermia in the water. I think the greatest irony is that Phillips told Bride to dress warmly, but eventually Phillips was the one who died of hypothermia - it's as though he helped his friend so much that he didn't survive eventually.

Warmest regards,
Charmaine
with thanks to Allison and Matthew
 
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matthew Sims

Guest
Thank Allison for all that. She raised my interest levels, by putting a perspective on it i never would have thought of. This young lady does not realise the incredible gift she has of seeing the very soul of people, the things that remind us what its all about..I pale in comparison to her and her intellect
 
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Allison Lane

Guest
Good grief, you guys... I'm not the goddess it feels like you're making me out to be.
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Honestly, though, Harold Bride and Jack Phillips utterly fascinate me, and not much thrills me more than to just simply learn about them and what they were like as people. I wish very much that I could have known them. And that I could see a picture of Bride smiling, because in every picture I've ever seen of him he looks so solemn.
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And it flatters me that I've inspired someone to do their own researching... I didn't think I was capable of anything like that.
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At least now that I'm home from college for a little while I can go back to scouring contemporary issues of the New York Times for articles pertaining to the merry wireless men, etc., which has been one of my pet projects for some time.
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-Allison L.
 
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matthew Sims

Guest
Allison-Thats what i try and tell you all the time, you do inspire people. Sometimes we forget the very basic fabrics of what make us human. You, in your wonderfully introperspective thoughts, make people remember that. I feel sorry for both those men. How could you not? They knew they suddenly were operating an object that might well save or not save the lives of hundreds. Yet in the midst of this, the tragedy seem to strike them both in a way no other event on Titanic could have done. It seperated them from each other
 

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