Has the Boiler Room ever been explored?

Tim Aldrich

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Jan 26, 2018
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The thing is that going down where the stacks were and into the uptakes wouldn't lead you into the boiler room so much as it would lead you right into the boilers themselves. Those things are still right where the builders left them.
Agreed. Unless the smoke box doors happened to be open or missing the only things to see would be the ends of the fire tubes. I had wondered about the Fidley trunks but I'm guessing there would be fans preventing (if they're still there) access.
 
Jun 18, 2016
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Agreed. Unless the smoke box doors happened to be open or missing the only things to see would be the ends of the fire tubes. I had wondered about the Fidley trunks but I'm guessing there would be fans preventing (if they're still there) access.
Hence my amusement. Cussler's book had all the boilers come crashing out of the bow during the sinking.

The Fidley fans themselves are on G deck. I'm looking at the shaft *between* the flue/stack uptake and the Fidley shaft.
Titanic-vent-addendum20001.jpg


The grated areas.
(this appears to be from Bob Read's CAD plans; all rights and credits belong to him)

Kodos
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Mr. Lowe! Take a bosun's party and a Master-at-Arms, and get those children off the foc'sle at once!"
 
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Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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The thing is that going down where the stacks were and into the uptakes wouldn't lead you into the boiler room so much as it would lead you right into the boilers themselves. Those things are still right where the builders left them.
That is assuming the feeds and piping are still in place. To my knowledge nobody has gone down and looked to see if access to previously unexplored areas of the ship has been opened by either damage caused during the sinking itself (particularly the impact with the seafloor) or through the deterioration of the wreck.

That is the only possible bright side of the wreck's slow deterioration, while derbies might end up blocking obvious paths to areas of the ship, new and unexpected ones may open up over time.

Agreed. Unless the smoke box doors happened to be open or missing the only things to see would be the ends of the fire tubes. I had wondered about the Fidley trunks but I'm guessing there would be fans preventing (if they're still there) access.
Agreed. The thing is though, as I stated above, you cannot actually know until someone makes the attempt. If I had infinite dollars (or just Jame's Cameron's fortune), I think it would certainly be worth it to try. Worst case scenario is access is blocked; however, what does that cost you really? I doubt even a full day's diving time.
 

Josh M

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Feb 22, 2018
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I would have thought there could be a chance to access the forward boiler room by maneuvering down the fireman's forward spiral staircase in the bow that leads to the fireman's passage on the tank top deck; the fireman's passage then leads to the first boiler room. Of course there is probably a watertight door that was closed somewhere along the way here- probably blocking the entrance from the fireman's passage to the boiler room, but I am not sure.

I think Cameron did attempt to send an ROV down the staircase but determined it too difficult and decided not to risk it.
 

Tim Aldrich

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Jan 26, 2018
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I would have thought there could be a chance to access the forward boiler room by maneuvering down the fireman's forward spiral staircase in the bow that leads to the fireman's passage on the tank top deck; the fireman's passage then leads to the first boiler room. Of course there is probably a watertight door that was closed somewhere along the way here- probably blocking the entrance from the fireman's passage to the boiler room, but I am not sure.

I think Cameron did attempt to send an ROV down the staircase but determined it too difficult and decided not to risk it.
There are two watertight doors at the after end of the fireman's passage. Have a look at the tank top plan which is available on ET's main website.
 

Josh M

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Feb 22, 2018
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There are two watertight doors at the after end of the fireman's passage. Have a look at the tank top plan which is available on ET's main website.
Thank you, do you know if James Cameron ever explored the fireman's passage?
 
May 3, 2005
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if the cable/wire was not problem the exploration would have been done,they would need send recevier and transmitter down to bottom then use radio controlled ROV [if ever those exsist] it would be really nice if hard-to-explore areas would be finally explored,ROV tecnology keeps progressing and they eventually get best one but wreck dont have much time left.

Cameron managed to explore engine room and reach the WTD to turbine room but the WTD was closed and full of debris so could not go more.... why they did not try go around and use ripped shell plating as access point to enter compartment?.

i am wondering what happened to engine telegraph in engine room, heard it was mounted on one of engine colunns but the telegraph was never found,only bridge telegraphs were found and one or two recovered.
I don't think it would be possible to have a radio controlled ROV. You simply can not receive and transmit radio waves through water and especially salt water. The radio waves would also be blocked by metal bulkheads , etc.in the way, too.
Unfortunately cable controls are the only means available for control of an ROV.
 
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May 3, 2005
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I don't think it would be possible to have a radio controlled ROV. You simply can not receive and transmit radio waves through water and especially salt water. The radio waves would also be blocked by metal bulkheads , etc.in the way, too.
Unfortunately cable controls are the only means available for control of an ROV.
I waited too long to edit my post.
The. Radio idea seemed to be a good idea.
But upon looking further into the matter , unless there is some tremendous advance in technology there never would be any possibilities for ROV's from radio. Just a guess is that one of the biggest problems is getting the video from the camera in the ROV back to some type of display wherever it might.
And the problem with the cable is trying to get the ROV down to the place where you want to look and back to the surface is the problem of the cable getting snagged or entangled along the way to and from the place.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Thank you, do you know if James Cameron ever explored the fireman's passage?
If you mean the fireman's tunel it is mainly destroyed when bow wreck hit the bottom. I think it was Bill Sauder who mentioned that they were able to see inside though the hole on the starboard side and see it collapsed as far as I remember.
 
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CM1971

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Aug 26, 2018
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I'm pretty sure that the only "exploration" that has been done in right where the bow section is split. Other than that I remember Cameron attempting it, but ultimately failing, if my memory is right. (Also I forget the expedition/year).
 

Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
if the cable/wire was not problem the exploration would have been done,they would need send recevier and transmitter down to bottom then use radio controlled ROV [if ever those exsist] it would be really nice if hard-to-explore areas would be finally explored,ROV tecnology keeps progressing and they eventually get best one but wreck dont have much time left.

Cameron managed to explore engine room and reach the WTD to turbine room but the WTD was closed and full of debris so could not go more.... why they did not try go around and use ripped shell plating as access point to enter compartment?.

i am wondering what happened to engine telegraph in engine room, heard it was mounted on one of engine colunns but the telegraph was never found,only bridge telegraphs were found and one or two recovered.
I am not an expert, but I am guessing that to deploy an ROV the best practice would be for the submersible to 'land' and thus be absolutely stationary--which would be why so many submersibles landed on the intact foundation of the grand staircase dome. Then I am guessing those deformations in the side of the ship are placed in such a position that it would be very hard for the ROV to reach (based on cable length) from a submersible that has either landed on a stable portion of Titanic's wreck, or the sea floor.

Another supposition would be that those deformations have very 'sharp' edges, and that a cabled ROV is at a greater risk of being lost if sent through them.