Have the films got it wrong

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Phil Puncher

Guest
In both the original film of the Titanic disaster (A Night to Remember) and the recent 'Titanic' movie, on seeing the iceberg the officer on the bridge calls for the helm to be 'hard a starboard' but in both cases the wheel is turned to port and the ship turns to port, allowing the iceberg to pass down the starboard side of the ship.

Is this just poor continuity on behalf of both film makers or is there a nautical reason behind it?
 
M

M. Thayer III

Guest
Hi Phil

It is my understanding that in the nautical world when an order is given to "hard" something like "hard to starboard" it means to "immediately turn away" from the starboard side.

In the case of the Titanic First officer Murdock gave that command as a result of sixth officer Moody's information presented to him as to the position of the iceberg.
 
P

Phil Puncher

Guest
Hi Dave

Thanks for that. I have also received an email from an Aussie gent called Dave Gittins who has a great website on http://users.senet.com au/~gittins/index.html where he explains the reasoning under the heading "That Damned Wheel"
Apparently it all goes back to when ships were steered by a tiller and not a wheel. It would then be necessary to push the tiller to starboard to turn the ship/boat to port and visa versa. Simple really. Suggest you visit the website.