Height of the machinery deck

Ajmal Dar

Member
Jan 5, 2018
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Nottingham
does anyone know the height of the deck that contained the boilers, engines etc. was it one height all the way along Titanic or did the height vary according to the position along the ship. I am talking about the deck below G deck where theengines, boilers etc were. I cant get the deck plans up properly so i cant see any dimensions for the decks.

best regards,

Ajmal
 

Athlen

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Apr 14, 2012
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plan-of-the-Titanic-used-during-the-inquiry.jpg


Here's an older profile (this is apparently a copy of the exhibit used at the Board of Trade inquiry in Britain) that will convey most of the information in the modern plans. All the boiler rooms are the same as the ones shown. As you can see, there isn't really one specific deck that forms the ceiling of the boiler and engine spaces. In the boiler rooms there are very large casings for carrying smoke up to the tunnels. On either side of the casings are spaces called "fidleys" used for ventilation (but men could often climb up into these spaces). There were skylights above both the reciprocating and turbine engines, and the spaces above the engine rooms were ventilated by the fourt funnel.

So, all the machinery spaces had facilities leading as far up as the boat deck and the funnels beyond. Generally speaking, the boiler rooms and engines occupied more or less the full width of G Deck and below, while from F Deck upwards there are boiler room and engine room casings going through the decks, all the way up.
 
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B-rad

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Jul 1, 2015
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Best bet is to just use the heights of the decks above waterline, and add & subtract the rest. The numbers can be found here:

TIP | British Wreck Commissioner's Inquiry | Report | Description of the Ship

For instance: the figures say that E deck was 11ft above the water line (34ft 7in) amidships. As can bee seen in the plans above that's the first deck above the reciprocating engines, so 45ft 7in (34ft+11) above keel. Then take away the height of the tanktop which was 6ft 3in (75in) in this area, (63in in the rest)... so 45ft 7in - 6ft 3in = 39ft 4in in height.

It's the long way, but rewarding lol. Perhaps someone actually has the figures. I remember a chart in one of Sam Halpern's papers or book (Centennial reappraisal) that had a graph showing deck height vs. water or something. Perhaps take a peek at his website too...

Titanicology
 
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Ajmal Dar

Member
Jan 5, 2018
95
14
18
Nottingham
Best bet is to just use the heights of the decks above waterline, and add & subtract the rest. The numbers can be found here:

TIP | British Wreck Commissioner's Inquiry | Report | Description of the Ship

For instance: the figures say that E deck was 11ft above the water line (34ft 7in) amidships. As can bee seen in the plans above that's the first deck above the reciprocating engines, so 45ft 7in (34ft+11) above keel. Then take away the height of the tanktop which was 6ft 3in (75in) in this area, (63in in the rest)... so 45ft 7in - 6ft 3in = 39ft 4in in height.

It's the long way, but rewarding lol. Perhaps someone actually has the figures. I remember a chart in one of Sam Halpern's papers or book (Centennial reappraisal) that had a graph showing deck height vs. water or something. Perhaps take a peek at his website too...

Titanicology
Dear Brad,
Thanks for your help and advice here.
Best regards,
Aj