Hello Everyone


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Traci Flynn

Guest
Hi Im new here and i have a question. PLease someone explain to me why race and wealth where put first when it came to who got to get off the boat and who didnt. Why did the "first" class woman and childern go first when the "third" class woman and childern was left behind to die. They are all people and all the woman and childern should have been broght to the lifeboats and gotten off together. Is it just a case of who has to the most money? Thanks
 
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M Thayer III

Guest
Hello Traci,

I think the captain and crew felt obligated to evacuate the Titanic certainly at the beginning based on first, second, and then steerage class.

Also I think in terms of the numbers of women and children in the various class ranges came into play as in First class being the less number with steerage having the largest number.

You have a limited amount of life boats and seats and with orders to evacuate "women and children" first and the location of first and second class passengers they would have access to the life boats first.
 
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ML Rice

Guest
Women & children were put into the boats first, regardless of class. There is no indication that anybody was turned away or made to wait according to class. Since the first class were closest to the boats, they got there first. The third class, however, were many decks down with no direct route to the boat deck. The ship was a maze of corridors & since many of the third class were foreigners, they couldn't even understand how to get up top. It seems that the third class was basically forgotten. Nobody really paid any thought to getting them, and since it WAS a time of strict class system, the third class people just waited until someone told them what to do. And unfortunately that never happened.
 
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Phil Puncher

Guest
I do not believe that women and children had access to boats totally 'regardless of class' I'm sure that once any women and children arrived at the boat deck they were not turned away or made to wait according to class. However as most of the steerage passengers were kept locked below by crew members, no doubt working to company orders, until the first and second class passengers were safely away I think we must accept that 'class distinction' was certainly alive and well on the fateful night.
 
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Traci Flynn

Guest
Thank you to all that replyed. It is sad to think that so many died because they where less wealthy or of a different class. Also it is sad that when you think that none of those life boats where full when they reached the ocean. Thank s again.
 

Pat Cook

Member
Apr 27, 2000
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Someone mentioned earlier the steerage passengers being locked below as part of the crew's orders and this reminded me of something. If the following is true, I believe we can stop blaming the crew and take on part of the blame ourselves right here in the United States - well, those that made the laws, anyway.

In Wyn Wade's book, "Titanic, End of a Dream", he states that, in 1912, such Immigration laws were still in effect as 'locking third class away from the other passengers to prevent the spread of infectious diseases'.

Thought I would pass that on, for what it's worth.

Best regards,
Cook
 
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Karen Rock

Guest
I remember reading that immigrants were checked for various types of disease even as they were waiting to board the ship, so I'm sure they kept the gates locked for this reason as well as keeping the various classes apart. Traci, there were a couple of stewards who did help the steerage passengers. Steward John E Hart brought about 50 or so women & children up from steerage, through the maze of corridors to the lifeboats. Not a lot but at least somebody tried to help them.
Karen
 
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Traci Flynn

Guest
At least someone tried to help them as you said Steward Hart assisted some to the upper decks. He probably risked his job as he done so though. Thanks Traci
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
4,988
223
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Don't romanticise Steward Hart. He was obeying orders and was not the only one to take third class passengers to the boats. The thing that strikes me is the time taken to get them up. Hart was ordered to get them up as early as 12-30 but it took around 40 minutes to get a party to the boat deck. As Hart returned he was obstructed by other passengers coming up, so it's clear that plenty of them were allowed up.

The doors and gates that were required to be locked were generally left unlocked, because they stopped the crew moving from their quarters to their workplaces. Crewmen kept an eye on wanderers. In the general chaos third class passengers actually rushed past doors that would have taken them to the boat deck. Even Hart used an awkward way to get up. Forget the movies. Read the evidence.

Two things strike me as particularly bad about the evacuation. How did big family groups like the Goodwins get ignored or overlooked? Who ordered the staff of the restaurant kept below decks?
 

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