HELPPlease


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Aug 31, 2004
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Okay, the following questions have probably been answered all over the place throughout the history of this site, but I'm to lazy to look, and who hasd the time to? Anyway, I've read in a few books that the Bremen passed by a field of bodies. I have no problem with this claim. A woman on the Bremen saw "A woman clinging to a shaggy dog" and that the woman refused to leave her dog. Okay...Whose dog? It couldn't be Kitty, Sun Yat Sen, Frou Frou, or Margaret Hays' Pomerainian. I know there were other dogs. I also know that some dogs were rescued, but these being the pomeranian and pekinese, I could understand a large dog not being allowed in. Did the dog exist? (Also, what was the pomeranian's name? And what color was it!?)

Okay.

Now, I also read that the Mackey Benette came across an upturned lifeboat with a bunch of bodies around it. The book said it was mostly women, wearing life jackets, and there was an oar with a piece of someone's skirt tied around it to signal a boat. What!?!? They also said (even more bizare) that the wounds and upturned boat could "only be caused by a large explosion" What in the world is this?! It sounds very bizare to me. I would greatly appreciate anyone who could shed some light on this.

(Explosions?!)
 
S

Sean C. Corenki

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Matthew, I've read the account of the Bremen passing by the mass of floating bodies (I believe on April 20) and the woman with shaggy dog story in several sources. This is however the first time I'm hearing the info in the second part of your question. What is your source for this info? Regards, Sean
 
Jun 12, 2004
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>>They also said (even more bizarre) that the wounds and upturned boat could "only be caused by a large explosion"<<

Who said this, Matthew? As far as I know, there were no explosions (at least no major explosions anyway). Enough happened that night to account for ghastly wounds and even burns. As for what caused the upturned boat...Well, we all know what caused that. However, considering that the first funnel collapsed near Collapsibles A and B, it is possible that heat and steam (and maybe even hot soot) within the funnel may have--and I emphasize the may have--spewed out as it fell and/or on impact with the water. With the number of individuals that were in the water in that vicinity at the time, it would have been easy for some of them to be caught in the swelter of the funnel's ejected contents. There were also quite a few other dangers occurring as the ship sunk, not the least of which was the actual break, so wounds discovered on the bodies could have conceivably been caused by God-knows-what.

By the way, if the source of the word "explosion" was a newspaper, then that's your answer. It may have been conjecture, it may have been due to creative sensationalism. The word "explosion" is enough to make such a story overly dramatic and, of course, sell more newspapers.
 
Aug 31, 2004
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It was in the "Mammoth Book of the Titanic"-And I'm not sure it was collapsable B-It said there was a great deal of women around it-and the most strange-a red skirt tied to an oar to signal other boats. It made it seem as if the boat had people in it at the time of capsising. I am very reluctant to believe these accounts, although the book did not claim this-the news reports contained in the book did-the same newspapers that claimed "all saved" and "liner towed to Halifax"

Oh well
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Well, there you go. Chances are likely that the account was originally posted in a newspaper. Perhaps it was for the sake of sensationalism, or perhaps it was a misinterpretation on someone's part, either the newspaper journalist or the author of Mammoth Book of the Titanic. If the "all saved" and "liner towed to Halifax" were wrong--and we know that obviously they were--then there's a very good chance , and likelihood, that this account was in error as well.

By the way, did the Mammoth... author treat it as truth or as misinformation? (I don't have the book, so I can't check myself)
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>By the way, did the Mammoth... author treat it as truth or as misinformation? <<

Neither. Geoff Tibbals is the editor/author of that book and basically it's a collection of primary source material (In excerpts) from publications such as Engineering and The Shipbuilder as well as contemporary news accounts and the like. I don't think he even attempted to evaluate the credibilty of same. He just collected the lot in a single volumn.

The value of Mammoth Book of Titanic lies in the fact that you can open it up and get a sense of what was being said at the time.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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>>The value of Mammoth Book of Titanic lies in the fact that you can open it up and get a sense of what was being said at the time.<<

That doesn't prove the story to have a basis of truth, although I realize that was part of the point you were making: Even at that there were stories being generated without merit of truth.

Thanks, Michael.
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Jul 9, 2000
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>>That doesn't prove the story to have a basis of truth, although I realize that was part of the point you were making:<<

Yep.

>>Even at that there were stories being generated without merit of truth.<<

Try the newspapers of the time. They had an astonishing ability to get interviews with survivors whether the interviews happened or not! The Weekly World News wishes they could be that creative!
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