Heroes and heroines

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John Meeks

Guest
I absolutely and totally agree with Don.

...and you can apply the experiences of those men to their colleagues who were involved any sinking that occurred before, or since...

Regards

John M
 
Dave Gittins

Dave Gittins

Member
One hero that never seems to be mentioned by name is Peter Sloan, the Chief Electrician. One hears of Joseph Bell and rightly so, but Sloan seems to be overlooked.
 
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James Hill

Member
i agree with you there.can you tell me if this story of chief engineneer Bells death?he went to his death with a smile and the cry "no lads,my extra weight would sink it".its in Dave Brycesons book The Titanic Disaster its about newspapers that wrote about the disaster.the boat Bell was been implored by some crewmen to climb upon is probably boat B (if this stories true)it does not say who reported this but can you tell me if its true?
 
Beth Barber

Beth Barber

Member
Hey Tracy - I would have to agree totally with what you said. Some people have attached a "hero" status to many celebrities/sports people etc... While some of them have had many accomplishments to be proud of - they are just humans like the rest of us. (except famous!lol)

The people who are in high risk jobs like policemen, firemen, etc.... I agree they are already heroes for choosing the careers they did, they have made a pledge to put others ahead of themselves. I applaud them all!! Just a short note about a personal Hero story. My little brother, David, is a "volunteer" fireman in a small town in Pa. Year before last, a week before thanksgiving, the home he shared with his wife and 7 kids (between the 2 of them) caught on fire in the middle of the night (this was a house they were renting) and my brother got out his wife and 5 of the kids easily. He went back into the house that was totally engulfed in flames to save 2 of the boys. The 3rd time he went in - he didn't come out - the local fire dept had finally made it there and they pulled him out of the house at the top of the stairs inside - he had 3rd degree burns over 50% of his body. The 2 boys died in the fire and my brother almost did trying his best to save them. Its been a year and a half and my brother has recovered tremendously. In my opinion (and a lot of others) - he is a Hero! Some people would say that because they were part of his family (stepsons) and the fact that he was a fireman - he was just doing his job. I am sure his instincts kicked in but he would have done the same in any other situation.

There were many many heroes involving Titanic (and 911) - many we will never know. I applaud them all too!!

- Beth
Happy
 
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patrick toms

Guest
I consider my grandfather andrew john shannon who came from cobh co cork,and was on the ship under the name of lionel leonard,to be a hero as he was the man who held the baby in his arms,as seen in the film a night to remember,a very sad portrayal of a fact which i know as some of the survivors spoke to my grandmother about it and said that was the last they saw of him,in turn my grandmother told me.
pat toms president shannon ulster titanic society
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
Hallo, Pat. Since not much is known about your grandfather, it would be appreciated if you could give us some details about his family and about his life before Titanic. Also do you have any idea who the survivors were who spoke to your grandmother - not their names perhaps, but were they local people? Passengers or crew members? And what, in more detail, did they tell her about him? It's interesting that your grandfather changed his name. Is it known why?
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patrick toms

Guest
bob godfrey,has asked some pertinent questions which i will endeavour to answer,my grandfather was born in cobh co cork,and married my grandmother in poole dorset,in 1908,he went absent in malta from the mediteranean fleet,and was a quartermaster on the ss philadelphia of the american line,the coal was taken out of the philadelphia and put on the titanic and my grandfather along with 4 others was transferred to titanic,from ss philadelphia,he was one of these five who were passengers and crew,unique in that.My grandmother was seen by local people who were on the titanic from that area,and told about the incidents concerning,the sinking.she got a titanic pension of £3-10/- a week for life for her and two children,my uncle and my mother eileen shannon.
pat toms president shannon ulster titanic society
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
Thank you for the info, Pat. Looking at the registries for Poole, Dorset, I see that your grandfather used his real name when he married. It's interesting that he went AWOL from the Royal Navy in the same year. That's maybe why he enlisted in the Merchant Navy under a different name? Your Grandmother was presumably Annie Matilda Gould, and your uncle was Leonard Shannon, born 1911? I don't know anything about a 'pension', but I've read that the family received a weekly allowance of £1 2s from the Titanic Relief fund. This was about the same as a seaman's pay. Was your Grandfather a seaman, or did he serve under another trade?
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Holly Peterson

Guest
My favorite heroines have got to be Annie Funk and Ruth Becker.
 
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jamie hague

Member
Hi everyone! Dont forget the hero who opened the dog kennels, possibly Robert Williams Daniel? Also Captain Arthur Rostron forever
 
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Tom McLeod

Member
Just another quick praise for Inger's first post, that was well written and quite moving. A possible note in this is Roderick Chisum, Archie Frost and the rest of the Guarantee group, there is little report of them and may speak to efforts beyond the call of duty by many below decks.
 
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Holly Peterson

Guest
I've also got to hand it to steward John Collins. As a teenage boy on his first ever ocean crossing, he took it upon himself to assist a woman with two small children during the final terrifying moments. Most young people, during such a difficult situation, would think entirely of saving themselves, but Collins did not hesitate to take the child in his arms and move towards a lifeboat. Unfortunately the child was not saved, but Collins made it to Collapsible B.

I've also read that, after spending hours in the freezing water wearing only a thin cotton vest and trousers, he was offered a thick fur coat by Emma Bliss, but gave it up to a woman wearing only a nightgown. Now that's admirable!
 
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Talira Greycrest

Guest
In my opinion, Captain Smith was definitely a hero (though his decision to increase Titanic's speed wasn't a great idea). Think back a few years to when the Costa Concordia sank. Her captain jumped in the first lifeboat he could get to and left the passengers and crew behind to drown, but Captain Smith did the exact opposite. He put the lives of the passengers and crew before his own life.
 
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