Heroes

Mar 15, 2001
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I am just wondering if anyone feels the same as I do about this matter. When I first really started getting interested in Titanic around 1995, I never knew the subject would be as popular as it was when Cameron's movie came out. I had already by that time collected some items that would have been impossible to get when the Titanic movie explosion happened. 1998 was an exciting time for anyone who loves Titanic. There were exhibits everywhere and new books and articles in every newspaper. I had never seen anything like this, not even when the Titanic was found in 1985. I just hate the thought that anyone would think that it was due to a movie about two fictional characters that would stoke my interest in Titanic. I was watching A&E's series about the Titanic back in 1995 and up to that point, nothing had been as moving to me as this was. One sad note for me is that in 1995 when I first got interested in Titanic, there were 9 survivors living- now there are only 3. I guess what I am trying to say in this post is 'Does anyone feel a certain sadness in the fact that once again, the subject of Titanic isn't as popular as it was in 1998? We live in such a fickle society where we need something new all the time.
 

Don Tweed

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Mar 30, 2006
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She will always hold sway with me, come hell or highwater!
A&E's "The Legend Lives On" is my all time fave documentary to the great lady!
-Don
 
Mar 28, 2002
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I'd say the story of the Titanic is as popular as it always was, at least as popular as it was before 1998. You'll be hard pressed to find anyone who has never heard of her.

Cheers,

Boz
 
Jun 18, 2007
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The Titanic isn't overwhelmingly popular like it was in 1998, but one thing you have to understand is that what was popular then wasn't the historical subject, but the movie. There were brief references to a historical matter when it pertained to the movie (an "Extra" report about the movie's inaccurate portrayal of William Murdoch springs to mind). But the general public wanted to know everything about Leo, not about the ship or its people. So, when interest in the movie waned, so did any mention of the Titanic in the mainstream media.

But, it's still possible for the Titanic to garner mention in the popular media. Just look at when Walter Lord died recently. It was mentioned in many of the mainstream news outlets, even if in passing.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Darren- I know exactly what you mean. It WAS a thrill to be able to find once out-of-print books back in print after the Cameron blitz. Also it was exciting to see so much interest rekindled on the subject many of us had quietly studied for so many years. I wonder how much of the interest was ignited by Leo and Kate and how much was actually a real interest in history and the ship! I think we are still in the "fallout" from those gravy days- the Titanic fashions are in all the current pattern books, and today's generation has an inkling now about Edwardian culture and times. I was not surprised to hear that all the Titanic Societies enjoyed bumper years after the film's release but membership has now subsided to pre-film numbers. This is indeed a "fifteen minutes of fame" world, sad to say. I think we did pick up a core of new historians and longterm devotees along the way.
 
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Timothy Brandsoy

Guest
I too was interested in Titanic long before the Cameron film.

Actually I'm kind of glad the movie neophytes have gone. I have nothing against the movie or the interest it generated. But a lot of people were interested for the wrong reasons IMO. Even the Leonardo web sites are dormant these days, I guess the teenage girls grew out of THAT phase.
But like Shelley said we did pick up a core of new historians and longterm devotees along the way. The pop culture phenomenon is gone, but the real enthusiasts are still there. I was so happy to find this board last year, a group of true devotees! Thank you all!

Tim B
 
Jun 26, 2002
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I have been interested in the Titanic for years, but I have only been on the internet for about 3 months now, so my time here has been short, but trust me, had I been online before this I would have been here. This is a wonderful site and I would like to thank everyone for making it so enjoyable.

Melinda
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Fashions and fads are nothing if not fickle in the extreme. The upside to the influance of the movie was that it did rekindle interest in the ship and there is a lot more out there to be had then there ever was befor. Some of it even worth the money!

The downside is that some people took interest in it for all the wrong reasons as Timothy suggests. Most of the groupie types are gone now having found other things to ooh and ahh over. I don't know of anyone who mourns their departure either. Those that remain however will form that core of dedicated Titanic and maritime historians of the next generation.
 

Steve Santini

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Nov 29, 2000
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Dear Michael,
As one who had a hand, (a minor one), in the production of the Cameron flick, I have had the opportunity to watch first hand the effect the movie had one the general perceptions the public had concerning the REAL Titanic and the tragedy concerning the same. And, to put in mildly, I was not usually pleased with what I saw. For years prior to the movie, our firm, Titanic Concepts Inc., had toured and exhibited authentic Titanic related relics and exhibitions to museums across Canada and even into the States. Prior to the Cameron flick, when people went to see these displays, they knew they were going to see real historical items closely connected with , if not in some cases actually from, the lost liner. There was a genuine air of respect and reverance for these unique and rare objects. However, following the release of the Cameron movie, I would hear such disturbing comments from potential visitors as, "So, all this junk is replicas and props from the movie, right?" As if that is not bad enough, I even heard comments from parents who stood outside the Manitoba Museum of the Titanic, (which we operated for 2 years), with kids what went something like, "Of course we are not paying to go in there" , "It's probably all just props and fake stuff from the movie". Quite frankly, such comments broke my heart. Even worse, were select comments made by certain people who actually entered our museum. You have no idea how pathetic and tragic it is to see a grown person RUN right by a REAL Titanic deck chair or a REAL carved piece of the liner's grand staircase just so they could point out the idiotic and fake "Heart of the Ocean" necklace to thier tour group or friends. What was the cause of this madness? Pop culture run amok and mass media replacing true history and factual events. The mind boggles;... You really had to see it to believe it!!! Regards, Steve Santini
 
May 12, 2002
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Hi guys,

Can I just put it a different viewpoint here. Chances are there were a lot of people who visited Titanic exhibitions and read books just because of the film. Chances are most of them don't really care any more. Fair enough, they probably wouldn't have shown any interest if the film hadn't been made. No loss.

However, some folk, have become extremely interested in Titanic and ocean liners in general, their interest initially sparked by the film. I know. I'm one of 'em!

Cheers

Paul
 

Erik Wood

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Apr 10, 2001
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Well said Paul.

I am one of the few who have been drawing pictures of Titanic since I was old enough to hold a crayon. What followed as a career at sea and being able to serve in the same industry. I think the film helped spark an interest in a lost art. Cunard is really the only remaining artist in the ocean going trade.

Erik
 
May 12, 2002
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Thanks Erik.

Nice point about Cunard being the only remaining artist. I see quite a few comments (here and on AHOLT) that the QM2 "won't be a proper Queen". Basically I think this is hogwash! QE2 was significantly different to the, admittedly superb, Mary and Lizzie. Yet she has gone on to be a world class vessel, hugely popular and with a long illustrious career. I personally think that QM2 looks every inch a Queen liner. Her slightly slab sided appearance is due to the market forces, just as was the equally non-traditional dual transatlantic / cruise liner construction of the QE2. I for one am extremely glad that Carnival have come along and invested heavily in Cunard. They're giving them the money to do what they do well.

Cheers

Paul
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Steve, when it comes to pop culture, there is very little anymore that surprises me. About the only thing that does surprise me is that anyone can be surprised at the new lows in bad taste it manages to find.

That's why I remarked that nobody mournes the passing of the groupie types from the scene.
 

Adam McGuirk

Member
May 19, 2002
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Guys I admitt that I am someone who didn't become interested in Titanic till Cameron's movie. But now I am as interested as any of you. I was just 10 when the movie came out so thats still an early age for Titanic buffing to start. Now I really don't care about the movie as much as I do wanting to find anything I can about the real ship.
Adam
 
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Timothy Brandsoy

Guest
Adam,

We all started somewhere! While Cameron's movie did get some people started (and we should be grateful for that) the ones that are still with Titanic are just as true blue as us old timers. I hope you didn't think we were classifying you with the other fadsters. You are one of us now!
;-[: (<<<<That's a vampire with puncture marks LOL)

BTW a lot of people seem to be "Let Down" about the QM2's modern design. Even heritage automobile designs can't be a copy of the original, be it a Metro Mini or a Thunderbird. Times and conditions change. I'll admitt the QM2 is 'phat' compared to the sleeker lines of the QE2, but she'll have a more opulent interior and Grand Staircase. If the ship is going to have the grandure of old, those wide open spaces (like Grand staircases) have to be built above the water tight compartments.

Tim B
 

Adam McGuirk

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May 19, 2002
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Yes Tim, I know I am one of you all now! I have been on and off obsessed with Titanic like I'll really want to read any thing on it for a while then I'll stop for a while but since I found this site it hasnt been on and off its been an obsession with reading every post and trying to find as much info as possible. I have 325 posts in 2 months which isn't bad!
Adam
 
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Trent Pheifer

Guest
I am sorta glad the movie hype is over. It sure was nice to get all that Titanic while it was in stores! I know the movie sparked the intrest of some to start researching the ship, but there were an aweful lot of people that ended up seeing Titanic as just a movie, not respecting it for the aweful event it was. I remember a story about the cemetarys in Halifax having garbage everywhere, because tour bus' were coming in to see J. Dawsons grave. I also got sick of people thinking I just liked the movie, people would ask me why I liked the movie so much, when really I just liked researching the true event. So I am glad the media hype has died down a little, but it is nice to see a news report on Titanic now and then too. Well thats just my 2 cents.

-Trent
 
Jul 10, 2009
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So am I. Everybody used to tell me that the Titanic is just a movie, that is not worth all the hype, that it is only famous because of the movie. ARRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!! Well, I'ts nice to know others feel that way too!
 
Mar 15, 2001
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Susan, try to go into a bookstore like Waldenbooks or any other and try to find a Titanic book. At least in my area you can't find one. During the time the movie was out, there were all kinds of Titanic books that available including ones that were previously out of print like Shelley noted. While the Titanic will always be popular to us, I am afraid the general populations interest in Titanic has waned considerably. This is just my opinion.