Heroes

Kyrila Scully

Member
Apr 15, 2001
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South Florida
Maybe they will even get James Cameron to host a 100-year-anniversary special on FOX network, or at least Victor Garber. Anyway, I will start saving my money for the re-release of books I can't find and other historical memorabilia brought back from dusty warehouse shelves. I've been interested in Titanic since 1964 when "A Night to Remember" aired on TV and inspired me into believing that, if those people could survive THAT, I could survive the painful stuff I was going through at the tender age of 9.

BTW, Steve Santini, any time you want to hire an experienced public speaker with a closet full of Edwardian costumes and a working knowledge of Titanic as a traveling tour guide for your exhibitions, let me know and I will sell my condo and buy a motor home.

Kyrila
 

Steve Santini

Member
Nov 29, 2000
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Dear Kyrila,
Thanks for the offer. I will keep that very strongly in mind. I could not think of many people better suited than you for the "job". P.S. An obsession like ours does not actually constitute a job at all. It is always a labour of love! Regards, Steve Santini.
 
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Richard K. Mason

Guest
Darren;

The story of the Titanic is a subject that will probably never remain closed. Like the assasination of JFK, it continues to interest people of all ages. Think about it. All of the what ifs, what could have beens, and what are's still generate a lot of discussion in print, television, and movies. As Walter Lord said in his 1980's follow-up work to A Night To Remember, "Tell A Story About The Titanic, And The Room Falls Silent". He's right, you know. I guess if people lose interest, it could be re-kindled by pointing out to them things like Lightoller's recorded statements for the BBC when at a certain moment, he talks about Lifeboat Number "9". { If you reverse his words, it sounds like he's saying, "TURN ME ON DEAD MAN" over and over!} Or maybe Captain Smith's last known photo, {If you hold it up to a mirror a certain way, it shows.......}. Well You Get The Picture, Don't You?.

Yesterday and Today,{Tomorrow Never Knows}
Richard
 
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Anthony Charles Givelin Paine

Guest
Dear Kathy,
I generally quite agree with you.I saw the film twice at a large sceen cinema in London and enjoyed it albeit the sinking scenes only(one of the last remaining cinemas of its kind ) However I felt in a way some what 'spiteful 'to Mr Cameron on how he depicted the British officers-inept!I am not sure why the cinema / film industy in your country distorts history so much and is somewhat anti British. Look at the film regrding the American submarine finding the 'Enigma 'machine. It was the British that found it. Look at the Disney films. Most of the key villains have British accents.Look also at Private Ryan and so on. You would think the USA saved us from Nazi Germany. I have heard the voice of Mr Lightowler on a BBC archive interview. Camerons Lightowler sounded if he had had 'recieved pronunciation '( The Queens English plus a little too posh )I have never found any animosity to the British in the USA,and I have many American friends and have worked with Americans. Perhaps I have got a bee in my bonnet and need to change the record.
With kind regards
Anthony.
 
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Beckey Payne

Guest
AHEM.. I happen to be one of those people who found myself "hooked" by the movie. I fully confess that my interest in Titanic was fleeting until 1997 and the night I saw Cameron's film. I left the movie theatre, looked at my husband and said "I'm going to have to get some books and read more about this". And here I am - 5 yrs later, and no less curious. I understand the points about the teeny bopper Leo fans who were interested in Titanic only as a romantic background for thier dreamboat du jour, but there are some of us who owe a genuine interest and respect of all things Titanic to the film in question.

I will agree that Titanic books, etc are harder to come by than they were at the time. I was lucky enough to discover my interest at a time when there were plenty of books at the front display of the bookstore, and certainly enough news items and tv specials to feed my appetite. Where now, one must go looking for this sort of thing.
 

Sarah Houtby

Member
Oct 12, 2005
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I have to agree with Kathy,
Murdoch (and the other officers) were mistreated in Cameron's flick. I am especially rankled over the way he made Moody seem like an incompetent jack@$$. (Moody IMHO is THE TRUEST hero of the Titanic) Cameron had him getting in the way all the time....gggrrrrr...anyway I'm sure Cameron didn't mean anything offensive by the way the officers were written...I think he spent so much time researching the ship herself that he 'forgot' about the people. You'll notice most of the inaccuracies in the movie are related to the people on board and not the ship herself.
 

Adam McGuirk

Member
May 19, 2002
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"(Moody IMHO is THE TRUEST hero of the Titanic)"

I think that is taking something away from the countless of others who were just as heroic as he was. So many people did so many other things. I think Thomas Andrews was a enormous hero. However, I don't put him above the countless of others that were heroic. By saying Moody is the truest hero, you are taking something away from so many other people. In my opinion anyone who was a hero is equal to the other heroes.

Adam
 
Jun 18, 2007
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I'm all for not using the word "hero" when discussing the Titanic, or any other tragic event for that matter. A person who is called a hero often did not intend to wind up as a hero...and most people who are called heroes wound up dying in said tragic event. I prefer to think that on the night of April 15th, there were no heroes, just many lives that were needlessly lost.

(I can already hear the calls for the troll to shut up...so I'm shutting up, sheesh!).
 
Dec 6, 2000
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I must ask - why does 'intending' to wind up as a hero make any difference?

Did the firemen who lost their lives at WTC 'intend' to be heroes? No. Where they? Yes. Were the firemen who happened to live heroes? Yes.

The fighters at the Alamo? D-Day, whether they lived or died?

Sometimes just being a hero means being at a certain place at a certain time - and helping others, or doing your own dangerous job, instead of intentionally saving their own butts at the expense of others.

Just my own opinion.
 
Jun 18, 2007
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My opinion...

Heroes tend to leave people behind...people who might not find the notion their departed loved one was a "hero" such a comfort.

And for the "heroes" who live, they are often uncomfortable with that label.

The firemen who survived the WTC have said they were only doing their job. They never wanted to be looked upon as heroes.
 
Dec 6, 2000
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No argument at all, Kritina, about how the ones who live look at themselves. Or how the family & friends left behind look at things.

Seems to me, 'heroes' are usually recognized by others not too close to the actual people involved.
 

Beth Barber

Member
Jun 7, 2001
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I agree Bill. Take a look at the people aboard Flight 93 on Sept. 11. They had the unique advantage of finding out what was happening and they knew they had to do something to regain control of their plane. They knew the risk they were taking that they might lose thier own lives (unfortunately they did) - but they succeeded in saving a countless number of other lives. They are heroes to me. - Beth
 
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Anthony Charles Givelin Paine

Guest
Dear Kathy,
Thank you for the personal message.
I quite agree in what you have said in your last posting.
With kind regards,
Anthony
 

Sarah Houtby

Member
Oct 12, 2005
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sorry Adam,
it was not my intention to detract from others. It's just that Moody is always an unsung hero, he's basically only remembered as 'the guy who answered the phone' no one really remembers him working all night to load boats and struggling with collapsible A. Sorry again for any offense, just my opinion and all...peace?
 

Adam McGuirk

Member
May 19, 2002
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Sarah, it wasn't anything that I took offense on. Please don't worry about that. Think of this, you say Moody is remembered as the thank you man and hardy gets any rememberance. The thing is, Moody does get some while there are so many others on Titanic that did heroic things that night that we will never know of. There not remembered at all.

Good points Bill

Adam