Historical Inaccuracies to historical characters in the last two Titanic films


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Fred Pelka

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Hi George,

Thanks for the info.

Following Monica's suggestion I did an advanced search and found quite a few threads, strung out over the years, on this whole question of artistic responsibility to historical truth. The one I just now finished reading is "Character Assassination/misleading portrayals in J. Cameron film." Lots of impassioned pro and con, including some discussion on the question that intrigues me most: what does it matter?

The "Character Assassination..." thread begins with a description of how a third rate TV series demeaned the memory and heroism of a WWII fighter squadron, some of the members of which were still living when the series was aired. It describes the sort of grief that these real veterans endured because of this bogus "history." There are of course much more egregious examples, for instance, the way the terrorists of the KKK were represented as heroes in "Birth of a Nation," while the real heroes of the era -- those blacks and whites willing to confront racism and try to change American society -- were maligned as thugs and carpetbaggers. THAT particular piece of historical revisionism (endorsed by no less a personage than Woodrow Wilson) I think did enormous damage, not only to our historic memory, but to American civil rights in general. There's a real good section about this in "Parting the Waters," the first volume of Taylor Branch's biography of Martin Luther King Jr. Or check out W.E.B. BuBois' defense of the Freedmen's Bureau in "The Souls of Black Folk."

Anyway, all this is to say that this topic seems to have been done to death here, so I'll just leave well enough alone for now. And if anybody finds, or wants to do, a psychological profile of Murdoch, well, you'll find at least one avid reader right here.

Best wishes to all,

Fred
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Fred!

>And if anybody finds, or wants to do, a >psychological profile of Murdoch, well,
>you'll find at least one avid reader right here.

For what it's worth, you might find my own speculation about Murdoch's possible frame of mind to be of interest; the info appears on my website at the end of the page devoted to "First Officer Murdoch and the Dalbeattie Defense."

The URL is:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/Carpathia/page11.htm

(Not everyone agrees with my speculation, of course, but that's only to be expected.)

At any rate, I thought you might like to take a look at my musings and form your own opinion.

All my best,

George
 
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Fred Pelka

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Hi George,

Thanks for the info. I've been to your site once and found it very interesting. I'll be back to look at it more closely, and then check out the links you offer. Off hand I'd say you've done a very impressive piece of work.

My best to all,

Fred
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Thank you, Fred -- I've done my best to create a worthwhile website and appreciate your kind comments very much.

Take care, my friend.

All my best,

George
 

George Behe

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Alma told me about the one where you're reclining provocatively on that bearskin rug while eating a big plate of spaghetti.... :)
 

Wesley Burton

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Apr 22, 2004
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I wish the 1997 film was more historicaly accurate. But, the sets were near perfect in all cases. Except when Andrews gives Rose directions to find Jack. I looked at the blueprints and this crewmans passage did not exist.
I cant picture Murdoch shooting passengers. He probobly felt bad enough for being responsible for the collision. I think it is possible he shot himself. The only other candidate I can think of is Smith.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Well, actually, it did exist, but it just wasn't where the scriptwriter placed it. Go to the E-Deck Plans to see the passage known as Scotland Road. You'll notice also that the Master-At-Arms shack is up forward along the centreline just across from the hatch for a cargo hold.
 

Wesley Burton

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Apr 22, 2004
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Yes I figured they meant that area. But The corridor was wider in real life. And while Rose is trying to save Jack, she goes upstairs and gets the axe. But on D-deck above that area there was only the dining saloon and reception area. Not what appears to be a third class area.
 
Jul 11, 2001
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True, Cameron built the lower deck sets to fit his filming needs. This was to keep the action flowing. E-decks Scotland road was shared by the crew and steerage passengers so there were stairways along it that led to a maze of steerage passenger compartments. Despite being not 100% accurate it does convey the fact that it could get real confusing down there. Having the Master at Arms office at an inside room would not be as dramatic without seeing the water creeping up that porthole window.
 
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