How Cal Would've/Should've Died


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Jun 12, 2004
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Here's another fun one: If Cal were to have died in the tragedy, how do you think he would've/should've died? What would've been the appropriate time, place, and manner for him to die and why? What would've been a great last line?...

I was thinking about this, just for the sake of amusement, and thought I'd ask. After all, this is the right place for it.
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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I suggest crushed by the falling Renault when it was being hoisted aboard.

As he expires, Rose says, "I told you to buy American!"

As the Renault is lifted off Cal, Rose gets knocked off the dock and drowns. Jack drowns trying to save her.

Have I ever mentioned that I think it's a lousy movie?
 
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Jack Coburn

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Not intending to be serious, instead of that guy pushing tommy straight into Murdoch's gun he should have pushed Cal instead. Do you think Murdoch would still feel as guilty?
 
Jun 20, 2004
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That's an interesting question. Hard to tell, but judging by the look Murdoch gave Cal when Cal shoved the money into his pocket, I don't think he thought too highly of him. That's a good one actually, Cal being shot! Serves him right for trying to shoot Jack & Rose.

Or instead of Fabrizio being crushed by the falling funnel, it should have fallen on Cal.

Another one, how about Cal being on the deck of the ship where it breaks into two and he falls down between the two halves.
evil.gif
 
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Jack Coburn

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I suppose it dosen't really matter, as he does eventually get his comeuppance, "when the crash of '29 hits". I actually think it's rather ironic that he dies the same way as Murdoch.
 
Oct 23, 2000
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It was an insipid bit of storytelling NOT to have Murdoch shoot Cal. Would have made more sense had after their "Your money can't save you" argument, Cal made a dive for the lifeboat and pow! Murdoch shot him. Would also have fit the shootings/suicide theory well too. Alas, it was botched.
An even better death would have been if the alleged "hero" of the story-Jack-had killed him and his hired thug. As anyone who has seen "Cobra" can attest, the purpose of the handsome hero is not only to get the girl, but kill all the bad guys.
It was lame not to have Jack kill Cal and Spicer, and is one of the many reaons I dislike "Titanic" not only as a historical drama, but as a fictional story, too, since I pride myself not only on being historically accurate, but telling a good story in whatever I write.

Richard
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Why couldn't we have him cartwheeling through the air and clanging off the propellors (roped to Les Dennis and John Sessions)? Or have him hanging off the stern rail (instead of Fabrizio's love interest) with Rose doing a merry Irish jig on his fingers?
 

Thomas Kelly

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Jun 19, 2004
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How about being crushed when the split ship falls back down? Or falling and hitting the propeller ont the way down?
 

Jason D. Tiller

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quote:

"I actually think it's rather ironic that he dies the same way as Murdoch."

There's no evidence to suggest that Murdoch did shoot himself, so I'd be very careful in making that assumption, unless you have some hard evidence that the rest of us aren't aware of.

Check out the threads in Crew Research for more on this.​
 
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Jack Coburn

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yes, desiree, thank you for pointing that out, i did mean how he was portrayed in the film, not in the actual sinking.
 

Thomas Kelly

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"It was lame not to have Jack kill Cal and Spicer, and is one of the many reaons I dislike "Titanic" not only as a historical drama, but as a fictional story, too, since I pride myself not only on being historically accurate, but telling a good story in whatever I write."


If you wanna see Jack and Rose take out the bad guys I suggest you watch "Broken Arrow";)
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Reluctant though I am to discuss Rose and Cal ... I have to say, I do think his escape was entirely logical. The rich usually win, even if he did end up "putting a pistol in his mouth in the crash of '29". 17 more years, eh? Not too bad, all things considered. It was only a film ....
 
Oct 23, 2000
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"If you wanna see Jack and Rose take out the bad guys I suggest you watch "Broken Arrow";)"

Nah, I'd rather watch 'em deliver the (yawn) package to the Soviets, Admiral Sandecker. :)
(Sure hope that hurricane don't sink us again!
:))

Richard
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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Actually I was glad to see that Cal was able to escape. I don't want to contradict the opinions of the majority, but Cal is definitely my favourite character. First, he's older than Jack and knows better the reality (Jack seems a little boy, talking about his dreams and desires, he should be a poet not an artist - although both jobs are connected) and can give Rose the life she was born for. Why should she want a different life without rules and society restrictions? She had to face the life and accepted the destiny (at the time there were people who born poor and they just faced the situation). Why should Rose be different? So, as you can see, Cal shouldn't have died in any away, at least is my personal opinion.

Regards, João
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Yes....one of the principal flaws of Titanic is that Rose is so obnoxious that one instinctively finds oneself rooting for Cal. When a villain slaps a female character and one's initial reaction is "again, and harder" then the script needs some serious restructuring. If Rose thought that being RICH in 1912 was restrictive, her reaction to the restrictions of a life of poverty in 1912 can only be imagined. Let's face it- she was at a disadvantage to the other immigrant women who had marketable life skills, and could not even have found work in a sweatshop.
 
Jul 12, 2003
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To me, a gentleman would not have slapped a woman...no matter how she behaved. I didn't see an "again, and harder" reaction in her. I saw only a look of contempt for Cal in her eyes.

And to me, I did not find Rose obnoxious in the least. I liked her character and found her to be a strong-willed and determined woman. I like that she didn't conform to what her position in life expected of her.

I don't think she found just being rich in 1912 restrictive as much as she found the expected behavior from someone who was rich in 1912 being restrictive.

She just didn't seem, to me, to be someone who liked to conform to any patterns.

Immigrant women did have many marketable skills. My great-grandmother came here in 1909 and she went to work right away in a silk factory and a factory that made cardboard boxes.

I think Rose could have gotten a job in any factory if need be. She was so determined to let go of her former life that she may have well done that at some point.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>I didn't see an "again, and harder" reaction in her.

No- on the part of the audience. By that time, her Patty Hearst like behavior had become grating and I was only exposed to her for the first 9 hours of the movie. Poor Cal was stuck with the whiny, rude, and pretentious Miss Rose for the whole voyage! On top of which, the discovery that his fiancee was the sort of tramp who has sex with a stranger upon first meeting HAD to have been a bit appalling. So, although I did not condone the violence, I must say that I understood Cal's motives better than I did those of the strumpet with whom he was travelling.

It's not Rose's fault, being that she is fictional. It is the fault of script writers not intelligent~ or perhaps dedicated is a better word~ enough to create a character with anything worthwhile to say. With her...uh...Freud reference, Rose established herself as the cinematic equivalent of the annoying Goth kid we all knew in High School who would memorize the preface of a Required Reading book and then regurgitate it ad nauseum, without ever having gained any original insight to the work. In short- the reference was "painfully obvious," as was the littering of her suite with Postermat Impressionist prints. Ignoring for a minute the quality of Jack's artwork ( his true "moment" was waiting 65 year in the future when the Black Velvet, and Powder Blue Chevy Van With Side Panel Mural craze hit) and just jumping with hobnailed boots on the character itself...the script doesn't bother to tell us ANYTHING about Jack, other than a few clumsy expository lines about his boyhood. He is a cliche even more flat than Rose- if possible- and for all WE know he could well be a serial killer with a good line and laughable artistic talent. So, we have a bratty heiress with a big mouth and indiscriminate, dangerous, sexual habits (Richard Bennett's notorious Syphillis expose Damaged Goods was still 3 years in the future in 1912) pairing off with a sweet talking non-entity of whom she knows LESS than we, the audience, do. All very disturbing.....

>I think Rose could have gotten a job in any factory if need be.

She would have LOVED the 12 hour work day, the almost total lack of sanitary facilities, and the strong arm tactic employed by the owners. Even if she COULD operate a sewing machine, her "mouthy" quality would almost have guaranteed that if her boss did not quickly terminate her, her co-workers, who were notoriously tough women, would have.
 
Dec 3, 2005
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It's all about romanticism. People want to believe that only third class people can actually love. And they want fairy tale love. If you were to show the scene with the Strauss's from ANTR to people nowadays, they wouldn't understand that they were seeing a much deeper love and Jack and Rose could probably ever concieve of. Hence, poverty=liberation. Of course Jack would probably have never got on as well as he did in the film in the real world of 1912 if he tried to make a living drawing pictures. God knows Rose would be less keen to "spit like a man" once she got her first-class hands dirty. People eat up the stereotype of the first-class as soulless stepford wives (and husbands)endlessly one-upping each other. As a result, they can understand cookie-cutter characters like Jack, Rose and Cal. And when you invest $200,000,000 in a project, you need a gimmick to ensure sufficient returns.
 
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